Results for 'stirs and stillness'

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  1.  39
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xi’s Discussion of “Dreams”—And on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Yu Chang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in their own way, while Zhu Xi was perhaps the most outstanding one among them. He made profound explanations of dreams from aspects such as the relationship between dreams and the principles li and qi, the relationship between dreams and the state of the heart, and the relationship between dreams and an individual’s moral improvement. (...)
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  2.  10
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xi’s Discussion of “Dreams”—And on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Chang Yu - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
  3.  12
    Experiencing Lagos Through Dis-Stanced Stillness.Carol Magee - 2012 - Evental Aesthetics 1 (3):41-49.
    This essay offers distance and stillness as means by which to access and understand the dynamism of cities. I reflect on stillness as an unexpected aesthetic within artistic projects that represent urban environments, and as a vital approach to engaging with such artworks. Focusing on Lagos, Nigeria, I consider one photographic series by Abraham Oghobase and one sound work by Emeka Ogboh. I read their work in light of philosopher Jeff Malpas’s conceptualization of place as “existential ground.” In (...)
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  4.  2
    Quietism and Narrative Stillness.Amy M. King - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (3):532-551.
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article explores the possibilities for quietist narrative. Since quietism suggests resistance or condescension to telos, suspense, will, and the kinds of spirituality, politics, and ways of being associated with them, it seems unlikely that a narrative would be written or read by a practitioner of “ideal indifference” or by anyone averse on principle to initiative. But Gilbert White's text of 1789, The Natural History and Antiquities (...)
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  5. Polemic Against Stillness in the Hymns on the Lord's Supper.Karen B. Westerfield Tucker - 2006 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 88 (2):101-119.
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  6.  23
    The Stillness of Time and Philosophical Equanimity.George Schlesinger - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 30 (3):145 - 159.
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  7.  18
    Against Fetishism: The Moving Quiescence of Life 24 Frames a Second: Laura Mulvey (2006) Death 24x a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image. [REVIEW]Maria Walsh - 2006 - Film-Philosophy 10 (2):1-10.
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  8.  3
    The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere.Clark Davis - 2015 - Common Knowledge 21 (3):512.1-512.
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  9. Jesus Prayer and Stillness of Heart.J. Aerthayil - 2003 - Journal of Dharma 28 (4):529-542.
     
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  10. Flux and Flurry: Stillness and Hypermovement in Animated Worlds.Esther Leslie - 2008 - Radical Philosophy 152:21-30.
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  11. From Stillness to Movement and Back: Cartoon Theory Today.Esther Leslie - 2006 - Radical Philosophy 137:8-12.
     
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  12. Creative Stillness: Indian Perspectives on Art & Beauty.Vishwanath S. Naravane - 2000 - Distributors, Lokbharti.
     
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  13. The Eloquent Stillness of Stone: Rock in the Dry Landscape Garden.Graham Parkes - 2002 - In Michael F. Marra (ed.), Japanese Hermeneutics: Current Debates on Aesthetics and Interpretation. University of Hawai'i Press. pp. 44--59.
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  14. Dynamic Stillness Philosophical Conceptions of Ruhe in Schiller, Hölderlin, Bücher, and Heine.Mark William Roche - 1987
     
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  15. The Waves of Passions and the Stillness of the Sea: Appropriating Neoplatonic Imagery and Concept Formation-Theory in Middle Byzantine Commentaries on Aristotle.Michele Trizio - 2017 - In Sergei Mariev (ed.), Byzantine Perspectives on Neoplatonism. De Gruyter. pp. 67-78.
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  16.  5
    The Peaceful Stillness of the Silent Mind: Buddhism, Mind and Meditation.Thubten Yeshe - 2004 - Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive.
    The six teachings contained herein come from Lama Yeshe'¿¿s 1975 visit to Australia.Lama Yeshe on Mind:"At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but ...
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  17.  4
    The Double Stillness: Speech, Silence and Musicality in Nietzsche.Gary Peters - 1991 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 2:11-43.
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  18.  9
    Technology, Essence, and Everyday Living.Charles E. Scott - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (3):319-340.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 319 - 340 This paper engages “A Triadic Conversation” in _Conversations on a Country Path_. The context of this engagement is Heidegger’s account of τέχνη and φύσις in _Contributions to Philosophy _ as they are put to work in the conversation of a guide, a scholar, and a scientist. The leading questions are whether Heidegger’s thoughts of _Seyn, Wesen_, and _Machination_ are helpful to understand and engage the pressing challenges to Western societies? Are (...)
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  19. Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect.Mel Y. Chen - 2012 - Duke University Press.
    In _Animacies_, Mel Y. Chen draws on recent debates about sexuality, race, and affect to examine how matter that is considered insensate, immobile, or deathly animates cultural lives. Toward that end, Chen investigates the blurry division between the living and the dead, or that which is beyond the human or animal. Within the field of linguistics, animacy has been described variously as a quality of agency, awareness, mobility, sentience, or liveness. Chen turns to cognitive linguistics to stress how language habitually (...)
     
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  20. The Power of Ideas.Isaiah Berlin - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    The essays collected in this new volume reveal Isaiah Berlin at his most lucid and accessible. He was constitutionally incapable of writing with the opacity of the specialist, but these shorter, more introductory pieces provide the perfect starting-point for the reader new to his work. Those who are already familiar with his writing will also be grateful for this further addition to his collected essays. The connecting theme of these essays, as in the case of earlier volumes, is the crucial (...)
     
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  21.  33
    How to Throw a Pot: The Centrality of the Potter's Wheel in the Zhuangzi.Wim De Reu - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (1):43 – 66.
    This article explains Zhuangzi's philosophy by analyzing the metaphor of the potter's wheel. I argue that this is one of the central images in the core chapters of the _Zhuangzi_. Together with two cognate images, it not only appears in some crucial passages, but also allows us to integrate a variety of seemingly independent topics. The article consists of four sections. I start by placing the potter's wheel against a background of other artisan tools. A second section focuses on three (...)
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  22. Editorial: Time & Experience: Twins of the Eternal Now?Gregory M. Nixon - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (5):482-489.
    In what follows, I suggest that, against most theories of time, there really is an actual present, a now, but that such an eternal moment cannot be found before or after time. It may even be semantically incoherent to say that such an eternal present exists since “it” is changeless and formless (presumably a dynamic chaos without location or duration) yet with creative potential. Such a field of near-infinite potential energy could have had no beginning and will have no end, (...)
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  23.  46
    'Right Words Are Like the Reverse'—The Daoist Rhetoric and the Linguistic Strategy in Early Chinese Buddhism.Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):283-307.
    ?Right words are like the reverse? is the concluding remark of chap. 78 in the Daoist classic Daodejing. Quoted in treatises composed by Seng Zhao (374?414), it designates the linguistic strategy used to unfold the Buddhist Madhyamaka meaning of ?emptiness? and ?ultimate truth?. In his treatise Things Do not Move, Seng Zhao demonstrates that ?motion and stillness? are not really contradictory, performing the deconstructive meaning of Buddhist ?emptiness? via the corresponding linguistic strategy. Though the topic of the discussion and (...)
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  24.  2
    Berkeley's Non-Cartesian Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):659-682.
    As central as the notion of mind is for Berkeley, it is not surprising that what he means by mind stirs debate. At issue are questions about not only what kind of thing a mind is but also how we can know it. This convergence of ontological and epistemological interests in discussing mind has led some commentators to argue that Berkeley's appeal to the Cartesian vocabulary of 'spiritual substance' signals his appropriation of elements of Descartes's theory of mind. But (...)
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  25. Searle on the Brink.Selmer Bringsjord - 1994 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 1.
    In his recent _The Rediscovery of the Mind_ John Searle tries to destroy cognitive science _and_ preserve a future in which a ``perfect science of the brain'' (1992, p. 235) arrives. I show that Searle can't accomplish both objectives. The ammunition he uses to realise the first stirs up a maelstrom of consciousness so wild it precludes securing the second.
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  26.  32
    Leisure, Freedom, and Liberal Education.Kevin Gary - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (2):121-136.
    At present liberal education is generally understood and justified as the acquisition of critical thinking skills and individual autonomy. Traditionally, however, the ultimate purpose of liberal education has been leisure. Freedom, it was thought, was not simply the result of critical thinking but also required the cultivation of leisure that involved a vigilant receptivity — a stillness from the busy world of work and the restive probing of a discursive mind. In this essay, Kevin Gary argues that the cultivation (...)
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  27.  89
    Cosmic Pessimism.Eugene Thacker - 2012 - Continent 2 (2):66-75.
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 66–75 ~*~ We’re Doomed. Pessimism is the night-side of thought, a melodrama of the futility of the brain, a poetry written in the graveyard of philosophy. Pessimism is a lyrical failure of philosophical thinking, each attempt at clear and coherent thought, sullen and submerged in the hidden joy of its own futility. The closest pessimism comes to philosophical argument is the droll and laconic “We’ll never make it,” or simply: “We’re doomed.” Every effort doomed to failure, every (...)
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  28.  5
    The Metaphysics of Awareness in the Philosophy of Laozi.James Giles - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):435-451.
    This paper shows that a careful reading of Laozi’s The Way and Its Power enables one to come up with a metaphysics of awareness. This is done by rejecting those accounts that paint Laozi as a mystic or cosmologist and by arguing for the human-centeredness of his approach. It is shown that three central ideas in Laozi’s work can all be understood as referring to properties of awareness. These three ideas are the Way , return , and non-action . The (...)
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  29. The Cabinet of Dr. Lacan.Richard Wollheim - 1991 - Topoi 10 (2):163--174.
    Obscurity is not the worst failing, and it is philistinism to pretend that it is. In a series of brilliant essays written over the last fifteen years Stanley Cavell has consistently argued that more important than the question whether obscurity could have been avoided is whether it affects our confidence in the author. Confidence raises the issue of intention, and I would have thought that the primary commitment of a psychoanalytic writer was to pass on, and (if he can) to (...)
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  30.  79
    Media Representations of Women and the “Iraq War”.Kelly Oliver - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (12):14-22.
    This essay examines media images of women in recent conflicts in the Middle East. From the Abu Ghraib prison abuses to protests in Iran, women have become the public face of violence, carried out and suffered. Women’s bodies are figured as sexual and violent, a potent combination that stirs public imagination and feeds into stereotypes of women as femme fatales or “bombshells.”.
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  31. Zhu XI's Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (1133–1180) and the other “gentlemen of Hunan” from about 1167 to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi (...)
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  32.  25
    Man & Machine: I Wonder If We Can Coexist. [REVIEW]John Durkin - 2003 - AI and Society 17 (3-4):383-390.
    We have always had some fear of our machines. During the Industrial Revolution, for instance, we developed machines fueled by steam and oil to assist us in our labour-intensive tasks, and saw dramatic increases in our productivity. But we worried, maybe rightfully so, because we saw machines that outpaced us physically and we knew that we could not compete. After a while, we learned to accept them. It has been our nature to accept new technologies after we have seen how (...)
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  33.  9
    You Have to Be Two to Start: Rational Thoughts About Love.Ernst von Glasersfeld - 2006 - Constructivist Foundations 2 (1):1-5.
    Excerpt: Love – as Ovid pointed out long ago – is an art. It has to be constantly created and requires persistent vigilance, care, and thoughtfulness. This is very clear from a constructivist point of view. The partner is always what we experience of him or her. We have abstracted him or her from our own experiences and therefore he or she is our construction and not, for example, a thing in itself which exists independently from us. And it is (...)
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  34.  37
    Anima minima.J. -Fr Lyotard - 1994 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 56 (1):1 - 13.
    As a rational discourse philosophy can not be reduced to any cultural concern. Culture we call that civilization which became aware of its own mortality and henceforth cultivates the aesthetic pleasure of representing its ruined ideals. It is the responsibility of philosophy to think through to the end the project of modern philosophical aesthetics, thus accomplishing it. The description of the aesthetic condition shows that aisthesis does not have to provide the fake peace of consentment with the sensible but on (...)
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  35.  9
    Ji Kang on Nourishing Life.David Chai - 2017 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 12 (1):38-53.
    Ji Kang’s “An Essay on Nourishing Life” has, for much of its history, been overshadowed by his more famous work “Sound is without Grief or Joy.” Be that as it may, “An Essay on Nourishing Life” is also an important text in that it delves into the interdependence of the heart-mind, spirit, and vital breath, and into how harmony between them is the key to ensuring physical longevity. In addition to investigating this aspect of his thought, this paper will also (...)
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  36.  25
    The Poetry of Alessandro De Francesco.Belle Cushing - 2011 - Continent 1 (4):286-310.
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 286—310. This mad play of writing —Stéphane Mallarmé Somewhere in between mathematics and theory, light and dark, physicality and projection, oscillates the poetry of Alessandro De Francesco. The texts hold no periods or commas, not even a capital letter for reference. Each piece stands as an individual construction, and yet the poetry flows in and out of the frame. Images resurface from one poem to the next, haunting the reader with reincarnations of an object lost in the (...)
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  37.  23
    Messages in a Bottle and Other Things Lost to the Sea: The Other Side of Critical Theory or a Reevaluation of Adorno's Aesthetic Theory.James Hellings - 2012 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (160):77-97.
    "I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness which characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction.1" "Saul Bellow"IntroductionAlthough analyses of artworks are limited in Adorno's oeuvre, I will argue that his critical theory is awash with images crystallizing thoughts to such a degree that it has every (...)
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  38.  3
    Il concetto corporale De Sanctis e la “concezione” dantesca.Francesco Valagussa - 2017 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 10 (2):19-29.
    The present essay focuses on De Sanctis’ Lectures on Dante, held during his exile in Turin and Zürich, in order to show how aesthetics, politics and religion converge in his works. De Sanctis reads Dante’s journey throughout Hell, Purgatory and Paradise both as a diary and a drama, which reintroduces action, passions and a multitude of feelings in the peace and stillness that rule the kingdom of God after the final Judgment. De Sanctis tries to illustrate how Dante unifies (...)
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  39. On Beauty. Plotinus - unknown - Phainomena 72.
    After concluding in the introduction that different things are beautiful in different ways, the first section of the treatise focuses on sensory beauty or beauty of bodies. Rejecting symmetry as a sufficient criterion for beauty, Plotinus explains that things in this world are beautiful to the extent that they participate in form and to the extent that shapeless matter is dominated by shape and the formative principle . Sensory beauty stirs the soul and helps it to recognise and remember (...)
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  40.  32
    On Laozi's Dao—An Attempt to Make Philosophy Speak Chinese.Ruohui Li - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):1-19.
    How is the meaning of the Dao to be understood? To answer this question, we should not make indiscreet remarks outside of the framework of Laozi’s thought; rather, we should enter the system, helping Laozi to establish a philosophical system on the Dao. Such an establishment is equivalent to that of a logical system of Laozi’s philosophy. We consider the presentation of Laozi’s thought as unverified propositions, and the purpose of this essay is to expound on these propositions and make (...)
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  41.  30
    A Study on the Theory of “Returning to the Original” and “Recovering Nature” in Chinese Philosophy.Shiling Xiang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):502-519.
    The approach of returning to the original and recovering nature is a typical characteristic of Chinese philosophy. It was founded by the Daoist School and followed by both Daoist and Confucian schools. The precondition of returning to the original and recovering nature is the stillness and goodness within nature integrated into a whole afterwards. Its implementation includes not only returning to the original root so as to achieve the philosophical aim but also restoration to the original nature after it (...)
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  42. Leibniz: How Does Sword Steel Get to Be so Smart?Mark Wilson - unknown
    In substantial ways, the strangest aspects of Leibniz's wild metaphysical architecture (monads and all that) lie grounded in his efforts to understand the "unreasonable effectiveness" of the mathematics utilized in the classical modeling of ordinary materials (of which we will adopt sword steel as a chief paradigm, for reasons to be explained later). In doing so, Leibniz proceeds in a more acutely reasoned fashion than does Eugene Wigner in the famously fuzzy article from which the phrase "unreasonable effectiveness" descends. There (...)
     
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  43.  11
    The Gravity of Pure Forces.Nico Jenkins - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):60-67.
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 60-67. At the beginning of Martin Heidegger’s lecture “Time and Being,” presented to the University of Freiburg in 1962, he cautions against, it would seem, the requirement that philosophy make sense, or be necessarily responsible (Stambaugh, 1972). At that time Heidegger's project focused on thinking as thinking and in order to elucidate his ideas he drew comparisons between his project and two paintings by Paul Klee as well with a poem by Georg Trakl. In front of Klee's (...)
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  44. Repetitions.Jeff Malpas - manuscript
    Oars sweep against resisting calm, the arc of their pull marking out a disturbance that clusters round each bite of the blade, their swing marking a measured passage across the lake’s expanse. The oars’ rhythmic movement, their muffled thudding resounding in the wooden curve of the hull whose upturned vaulting duplicates the sky’s own arch, reverberates in two realms, under air and above water, connecting at the same time as it disrupts. The movement of the oar, and of the boat, (...)
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  45.  11
    Beyond Objectiveness: Non-Dualism and Fiction.M. Cyzman - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):173-182.
    Context: Traditional research on the fiction/non-fiction distinction is the fruit of an essentialist methodology in which the procedures of ontologizing and textualizing are assumed as obligatory. Ontologizing and textualizing form the basic discursive technique, in which analyses are focused on the object as the semantic centre. Theory of literary fiction – deeply rooted in Alexius Meinong’s theory of non-existent objects – is object-orientated and, as a result, is always ontologically involved/engaged. Problem: The re-description of the fundamental literary problems as a (...)
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  46.  6
    “Not Like Any Form of Activity” Waiting in Emerson, Melville, and Weil.Clark Davis - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (1):39-58.
    In his meditation on Emerson's self-reliance, George Kateb argues that Emerson's entrance into antislavery politics, particularly his calls for collective mobilization, constitutes a “deviation from his theory of self-reliance, not its transformation.” Though Emerson often imagines a self-reliance that can lead to action, his descriptions of the fundamental attitude of the self towards the world suggest passivity, attention, and waiting. Because he rules out logical or teleological sources for inspiration, his conception of self-reliance is fundamentally at odds with progressivist narratives (...)
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  47.  8
    Walking Out Into the Order of Things.Daniela Kato - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 26:57-68.
    This paper explores the perceptual space of Thomas A. Clark’s poetry and its links with the long and influential Western literary and artistic traditions of walking in the landscape, from Romanticism to Land Art. Particular attention will be given to the relations that Clark establishes in his writing between walking as a bodily practice and the multi-sensory engagement with the landscape it provides. It will be shown that Clark’s most significant contribution to the literature of walking lies in the balance (...)
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  48.  8
    Nature Science and “Three Changes”.Wang Guozheng - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:265-272.
    Once Zheng Xuan, a man of Han dynasty, made notations of “Yiwei”, he said: “The word ‘change’ contains three meanings: the first is simplifying, the second is transformation, and the third is unchanging ”, thus called to “three changes”. The wording “three changes” is able to be the different explanations of “Zhouyi”, and also can be understand to three meanings of the word “change” in “Zhouyi”. Everywhere in the nature, and in nature science, there are incalculable examples about “three changes”. (...)
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  49.  11
    Sokrates als Pythagoreer und die Anamnesis in Platons "Phaidon".Francisco J. González - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):452-454.
    45~ JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34:3 JULY 1996 text" , and an element of "oralism" remains in all of Plato's written works. Nonetheless, Robb's "speculations" on the Platonic dialogues are certainly worth reading. Robb is quite aware that his book stirs up controversial issues, and some of these are briefly stated and discussed in his concluding chapter, "Homer, the Alphabet, and the Progress of Greek Literacy and Paideia." And yet in the very notions of "literacy" and "progress," (...)
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  50.  2
    Cameroon Coughs and Sneezes, Symptomatic of Catching Africa's Cold of Conflict: Dealing with the Dilemmas and Controversies of a Country Grappling with its History.Sylvester Tabe Arrey - 2017 - International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences 77:1-34.
    Publication date: 14 June 2017 Source: Author: Sylvester Tabe Arrey This work examines events from Cameroon's life since becoming a nation to foster understanding of the worrisome political situation the country has been traversing since 2016. Bitter and unhappy with their treatment since joining the French-speaking part, many citizens of the minority English-speaking part feel fed up and desire a breakup. I show that apart from constituting an aspect of its pride, Cameroon's history is also a source of tricky challenges (...)
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