Results for 'suffering'

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  1.  78
    Distant Suffering: Morality, Media and Politics.Luc Boltanski - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Distant Suffering examines the moral and political implications for a spectator of the distant suffering of others as presented through the media. What are the morally acceptable responses to the sight of suffering on television, for example, when the viewer cannot act directly to affect the circumstances in which the suffering takes place? Luc Boltanski argues that spectators can actively involve themselves and others by speaking about what they have seen and how they were affected by (...)
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  2.  49
    Suffering and Virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Suffering, in one form or another, is present in all of our lives. But why do we suffer? On one reading, this is a question about the causes of physical and emotional suffering. But on another, it is a question about whether suffering has a point or purpose or value. In this ground-breaking book, Michael Brady argues that suffering is vital for the development of virtue, and hence for us to live happy or flourishing lives. After (...)
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  3. Ourt Patients Suffer?Coustney S. Suffer - 1997 - In R. A. Carson & C. R. Burns (eds.), Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 50--247.
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  4. Suffering and Moral Responsibility.Jamie Mayerfeld - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    In this work, Jamie Mayerfeld undertakes a careful inquiry into the meaning and moral significance of suffering. Understanding suffering in hedonistic terms as an affliction of feeling, he claims that it is an objective psychological condition, amenable to measurement and interpersonal comparison, although its accurate assessment is never easy. Mayerfeld goes on to examine the content of the duty to prevent suffering and the weight it has relative to other moral considerations. He argues that the prevention of (...)
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  5.  5
    Animal Suffering: The Science of Animal Welfare.Marian Stamp Dawkins - 1980 - Chapman & Hall.
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  6.  53
    Suffering and Transformative Experience.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2020 - In David Bain, Michael Brady & Jennifer Corns (eds.), The Philosophy of Suffering: Metaphysics, Value, and Normativity. London: Routledge. pp. 165-179.
    In this chapter we suggest that many experiences of suffering can be further illuminated as forms of transformative experience, using the term coined by L.A. Paul. Such suffering experiences arise from the vulnerability, dependence, and affliction intrinsic to the human condition. Such features can create a variety of positively, negatively, and ambivalently valanced forms of epistemically and personally transformative experiences, as we detail here. We argue that the productive element of suffering experiences can be articulated as transformative, (...)
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  7. Suffering Without Subjectivity.Peter Carruthers - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 121 (2):99-125.
    This paper argues that it is possible for suffering to occur in the absence of phenomenal consciousness – in the absence of a certain sort of experiential subjectivity, that is. (Phenomenal consciousness is the property that some mental states possess, when it is like something to undergo them, or when they have subjective feels, or possess qualia.) So even if theories of phenomenal consciousness that would withhold such consciousness from most species of non-human animal are correct, this neednt mean (...)
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  8. Animal Suffering, Evolution, and the Origins of Evil: Toward a “Free Creatures” Defense.Joshua M. Moritz - 2014 - Zygon 49 (2):348-380.
    Does an affirmation of theistic evolution make the task of theodicy impossible? In this article, I will review a number of ancient and contemporary responses to the problem of evil as it concerns animal suffering and suggest a possible way forward which employs the ancient Jewish insight that evil—as resistance to God's will that results in suffering and alienation from God's purposes—precedes the arrival of human beings and already has a firm foothold in the nonhuman animal world long (...)
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  9. Suffering and the Shape of Well-Being in Buddhist Ethics.Stephen E. Harris - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (3):242-259.
    This article explores the defense Indian Buddhist texts make in support of their conceptions of lives that are good for an individual. This defense occurs, largely, through their analysis of ordinary experience as being saturated by subtle forms of suffering . I begin by explicating the most influential of the Buddhist taxonomies of suffering: the threefold division into explicit suffering , the suffering of change , and conditioned suffering . Next, I sketch the three theories (...)
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  10.  74
    'Unbearable Suffering': A Qualitative Study on the Perspectives of Patients Who Request Assistance in Dying.M. K. Dees, M. J. Vernooij-Dassen, W. J. Dekkers, K. C. Vissers & C. van Weel - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):727-734.
    Background One of the objectives of medicine is to relieve patients' suffering. As a consequence, it is important to understand patients' perspectives of suffering and their ability to cope. However, there is poor insight into what determines their suffering and their ability to bear it. Purpose To explore the constituent elements of suffering of patients who explicitly request euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) and to better understand unbearable suffering from the patients' perspective. Patients and methods (...)
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  11. Illness, Suffering and Voluntary Euthanasia.Jukka Varelius - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):75–83.
    It is often accepted that we may legitimately speak about voluntary euthanasia only in cases of persons who are suffering because they are incurably injured or have an incurable disease. This article argues that when we consider the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia, we have no good reason to concentrate only on persons who are ill or injured and suffering.
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  12.  39
    Conceptualizing Suffering and Pain.Noelia Bueno-Gómez - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12:7.
    BackgroundThis article aims to contribute to a better conceptualization of pain and suffering by providing non-essential and non-naturalistic definitions of both phenomena. Contributions of classical evidence-based medicine, the humanistic turn in medicine, as well as the phenomenology and narrative theories of suffering and pain, together with certain conceptions of the person beyond them are critically discussed with such purpose.MethodsA philosophical methodology is used, based on the review of existent literature on the topic and the argumentation in favor of (...)
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  13.  57
    Suffering at the End of Life.Jukka Varelius - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):195-200.
    In the end‐of‐life context, alleviation of the suffering of a distressed patient is usually seen as a, if not the, central goal for the medical personnel treating her. Yet it has also been argued that suffering should be seen as a part of good dying. More precisely, it has been maintained that alleviating a dying patient’s suffering can make her unable to take care of practical end‐of‐life matters, deprive her of an opportunity to ask questions about and (...)
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  14. The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine.Eric J. Cassell - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    Here is a thoroughly updated edition of a classic in palliative medicine. Two new chapters have been added to the 1991 edition, along with a new preface summarizing where progress has been made and where it has not in the area of pain management. This book addresses the timely issue of doctor-patient relationships arguing that the patient, not the disease, should be the central focus of medicine. Included are a number of compelling patient narratives. Praise for the first edition "Well (...)
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  15. The World According to Suffering.Antti Kauppinen - 2020 - In Michael S. Brady, David Bain & Jennifer Corns (eds.), The Philosophy of Suffering. London: Routledge.
    On the face of it, suffering from the loss of a loved one and suffering from intense pain are very different things. What makes them both experiences of suffering? I argue it’s neither their unpleasantness nor the fact that we desire not to have such experiences. Rather, what we suffer from negatively transforms the way our situation as a whole appears to us. To cash this out, I introduce the notion of negative affective construal, which involves practically (...)
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  16. Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture.Elisa Aaltola - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
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  17. Wild Animal Suffering is Intractable.Nicolas Delon & Duncan Purves - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):239-260.
    Most people believe that suffering is intrinsically bad. In conjunction with facts about our world and plausible moral principles, this yields a pro tanto obligation to reduce suffering. This is the intuitive starting point for the moral argument in favor of interventions to prevent wild animal suffering. If we accept the moral principle that we ought, pro tanto, to reduce the suffering of all sentient creatures, and we recognize the prevalence of suffering in the wild, (...)
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  18. Useless Suffering.Emmanuel Levinas - 1988 - In Robert Bernasconi & David Wood (eds.), The Provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the Other. Routledge. pp. 156--167.
     
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  19.  40
    The Spectatorship of Suffering.Lilie Chouliaraki - 2006 - Sage Publications.
    "The work is on an important topic that has been oft debated but rarely systematically studied – the political, cultural, and moral effects of distant news coverage of suffering. [The book] is extremely well steeped in the relevant literature, including semiotics, discourse analysis, meda and social theory and makes a fresh methodological contribution by looking at the codes and formats of news about suffering. It has a fresh vision and answer to some of the stickiest moral and media (...)
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  20.  5
    Relational suffering and the moral authority of love and care.Georgina D. Campelia, Jennifer C. Kett & Aaron Wightman - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):165-178.
    Suffering is a ubiquitous yet elusive concept in health care. In a field devoted to the pursuit of objective data, suffering is a phenomenon with deep ties to subjective experience, moral values, and cultural norms. Suffering’s tie to subjective experience makes it challenging to discern and respond to the suffering of others. In particular, the question of whether a child with profound neurocognitive disabilities can suffer has generated a robust discourse, rooted in philosophical conceptualizations of personhood (...)
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  21.  57
    Suffering and the Goals of Medicine.Stan van Hooft - 1998 - Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):125-131.
    Taking as its starting point a recent statement of the Goals of Medicine published by the Hastings Centre, this paper argues against the dualistic distinction between pain and suffering. It uses an Aristotelian conception of the person to suggest that malady, pain, and disablement are objective forms of suffering not dependent upon any state of consciousness of the victim. As a result, medicine effectively relieves suffering when it cures malady and relieves pain. There is no medical mission (...)
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  22. Medical Expertise, Existential Suffering and Ending Life.Jukka Varelius - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):104-107.
    In this article, I assess the position that voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide ought not to be accepted in the cases of persons who suffer existentially but who have no medical condition, because existential questions do not fall within the domain of physicians’ professional expertise. I maintain that VE and PAS based on suffering arising from medical conditions involves existential issues relevantly similar to those confronted in connection with existential suffering. On that basis I conclude that if VE (...)
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  23.  45
    Does Suffering Dominate Enjoyment in the Animal Kingdom? An Update to Welfare Biology.Zach Groff & Yew-Kwang Ng - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (4):40.
    Ng :255–285, 1995. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00852469) models the evolutionary dynamics underlying the existence of suffering and enjoyment and concludes that there is likely to be more suffering than enjoyment in nature. In this paper, we find an error in Ng’s model that, when fixed, negates the original conclusion. Instead, the model offers only ambiguity as to whether suffering or enjoyment predominates in nature. We illustrate the dynamics around suffering and enjoyment with the most plausible parameters. In our illustration, (...)
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  24. Suffering Rights as Paradoxes.Wendy Brown - 2000 - Constellations 7 (2):208-229.
  25.  23
    Suffering and Dying Well: On the Proper Aim of Palliative Care.Govert den Hartogh - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):413-424.
    In recent years a large empirical literature has appeared on suffering at the end of life. In this literature it is recognized that suffering has existential and social dimensions in addition to physical and psychological ones. The non-physical aspects of suffering, however, are still understood as pathological symptoms, to be reduced by therapeutical interventions as much as possible. But suffering itself and the negative emotional states it consists of are intentional states of mind which, as such, (...)
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  26.  18
    Who Suffers When Supervisors Are Unhappy? The Roles of Leader–Member Exchange and Abusive Supervision.Su-Ying Pan & Katrina Jia Lin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (3):799-811.
    Driven by the cognitive-neoassociationistic model of aggression, this study examines how supervisors’ negative affect at work influences their interaction with subordinates, which further affects subordinate outcomes. Drawing upon research on power/resource interdependence and victim precipitation theory, we also test whether the positive relationship between supervisors’ negative affect and abusive supervision is moderated by leader–member exchange. Using one hundred and eighty supervisor–subordinate dyads from five hotels, we found that, supervisors’ negative affect at work was positively related to abusive supervision, LMX buffered (...)
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  27. Pain, Suffering, and Anxiety in Animals and Humans.David DeGrazia & Andrew Rowan - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (3).
    We attempt to bring the concepts of pain, suffering, and anxiety into sufficient focus to make them serviceable for empirical investigation. The common-sense view that many animals experience these phenomena is supported by empirical and philosophical arguments. We conclude, first, that pain, suffering, and anxiety are different conceptually and as phenomena, and should not be conflated. Second, suffering can be the result — or perhaps take the form — of a variety of states including pain, anxiety, fear, (...)
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  28.  92
    Suffering and Transcendence.Eugene Thomas Long - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):139 - 148.
    This essay explores the experience of suffering in order to see to what extent it can be understood within the context of the human condition without diverting the reality of suffering or denying the meaning of human existence and divine reality. Particular attention is given to describing and interpreting what I call the transcendent dimensions of suffering with the intent of showing that in the experience of suffereing persons come up against the limits of what can be (...)
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  29. Skepticism, Empathy, and Animal Suffering.Elisa Aaltola - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):457-467.
    The suffering of nonhuman animals has become a noted factor in deciding public policy and legislative change. Yet, despite this growing concern, skepticism toward such suffering is still surprisingly common. This paper analyzes the merits of the skeptical approach, both in its moderate and extreme forms. In the first part it is claimed that the type of criterion for verification concerning the mental states of other animals posed by skepticism is overly (and, in the case of extreme skepticism, (...)
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  30. Suffering Injustice: Misrecognition as Moral Injury in Critical Theory.J. M. Bernstein - 2005 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):303 – 324.
    It is the persistence of social suffering in a world in which it could be eliminated that for Adorno is the source of the need for critical reflection, for philosophy. Philosophy continues and gains its cultural place because an as yet unbridgeable abyss separates the social potential for the relief of unnecessary human suffering and its emphatic continuance. Philosophy now is the culturally bound repository for the systematic acknowledgement and articulation of the meaning of the expanse of human (...)
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  31. Suffering and Bioethics.Ronald M. Green & Nathan J. Palpant (eds.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Before curing was a possibility, medicine was devoted to the relief of suffering. Attention to the relief of suffering often takes a back seat in modern biomedicine. This book seeks to place suffering at the center of biomedical attention, examining suffering in its biological, psychological, clinical, religious, and ethical dimensions.
     
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  32.  2
    Social Suffering: Sociology, Psychology, Politics.Emmanuel Renault - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This is the first English-language translation of an important book that contributes to contemporary debates about social suffering in sociology, social psychology, political theory and philosophy. Renault provides a systematic account of the ways in which social suffering could be conceptualised.
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  33.  7
    Suffering Existence: Nonhuman Animals and Ethics.Kay Peggs & Barry Smart - 2018 - In Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan Uk. pp. 419-443.
    This chapter explores critically ethical concerns arising from forms of suffering to which domesticated nonhuman animals are subjected in scientific instruction and research and within the industrial-factory-farm-food complex, as well as other contexts. Consideration is given to the views of Arthur Schopenhauer on suffering, René Descartes’s designation of ontological differences between human and non-human animals, and Donna Haraway’s reconfiguration of the relationship between human and nonhuman animals in scientific laboratory settings. Proceeding from a discussion of David Benatar’s “antinatalist” (...)
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  34. Suffer the Little Children.Hugh LaFollette & Larry May - 1995 - In William Aiken Hugh LaFollette (ed.), World Hunger and Morality. Prentice-Hall.
    Children are the real victims of world hunger: at least 70% of the malnourished people of the world are children. By best estimates forty thousand children a day die of starvation (FAO 1989: 5). Children do not have the ability to forage for themselves, and their nutritional needs are exceptionally high. Hence, they are unable to survive for long on their own, especially in lean times. Moreover, they are especially susceptible to diseases and conditions which are the staple of undernourished (...)
     
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  35.  13
    Suffering and the Goals of Medicine.Stan van Hooft - 1998 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (2):125-131.
    Taking as its starting point a recent statement of the Goals of Medicine published by the Hastings Centre, this paper argues against the dualistic distinction between pain and suffering. It uses an Aristotelian conception of the person to suggest that malady, pain, and disablement are objective forms of suffering not dependent upon any state of consciousness of the victim. As a result, medicine effectively relieves suffering when it cures malady and relieves pain. There is no medical mission (...)
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  36.  88
    On the Matter of Suffering: Derek Parfit and the Possibility of Deserved Punishment.Leo Zaibert - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (1):1-18.
    Derek Parfit has recently defended the view that no one can ever deserve to suffer. Were this view correct, its implications for the thorny problem of the justification of punishment would be extraordinary: age-old debates between consequentialists and retributivists would simply vanish, as punishment would only—and simply—be justifiable along Benthamite utilitarian lines. I here suggest that Parfit’s view is linked to uncharacteristically weak arguments, and that it ought to be rejected.
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  37.  10
    Suffering Without a Medical Diagnosis. A Critical View on the Biomedical Attitudes Towards Persons Suffering From Burnout and the Implications for Medical Care.Karin Mohn Engebretsen - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1150-1157.
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  38. Suffering and the Six Perfections: Using Adversity to Attain Wisdom in Mahāyāna Buddhist Ethics.Emily McRae - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (4):395-410.
  39.  30
    ‘Existential Suffering’ and Voluntary Medically Assisted Dying.Robert Young - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):108-109.
    Jukka Varelius1 ,2 and others3 have advocated that medically assisted dying should be made available on request to competent individuals experiencing ‘existential suffering’. Unlike Cassell and Rich, Varelius believes that existential sufferers do not have to be terminally ill before being helped to die. He does not regard ‘existential suffering’ on its own as sufficient to justify voluntary medically assisted dying, but believes it to be one of a set of jointly sufficient conditions . In ‘Medical expertise, existential (...)
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  40. Suffering From Indeterminacy: An Attempt at a Reactualization of Hegel's Philosophy of Right: Two Lectures.Axel Honneth - 2000 - Van Gorcum.
    INTRODUCTION In 1995, the Department of Philosophy of the University of Amsterdam created a Spinoza Chair in Philosophy with means generously provided by ...
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  41.  3
    The Suffering Stranger: Hermeneutics for Everyday Clinical Practice.Donna M. Orange - 2011 - Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.
    What is hermeneutics? -- The suffering stranger and the hermeneutics of trust -- Sandor Ferenczi : the analyst of last resort and the hermeneutics of trauma -- Frieda Fromm-Reichmann : incommunicable loneliness -- D.W. Winnicott : humanitarian without sentimentality -- Heinz Kohut : glimpsing the hidden suffering -- Bernard Brandchaft : liberating the incarcerated spirit.
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  42. Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art.Jerrold Levinson (ed.) - 2014 - Palgrave/Macmillan.
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  43.  17
    Recognizing Suffering.Eric J. Cassell - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (3):24-24.
  44.  25
    Suffering, Compassion and 'Doing Good Medical Ethics'.Paquita C. de Zulueta - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):87-90.
  45.  57
    Animal Suffering in Nature.Oscar Horta - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):261-279.
    Many people think we should refrain from intervening in nature as much as possible. One of the main reasons for thinking this way is that the existence of nature is a net positive. However, population dynamics teaches us that most sentient animals who come into existence in nature die shortly thereafter, mostly in painful ways. Those who survive often suffer greatly due to natural causes. If sentient beings matter, this gives us reasons to intervene to prevent such harms. This counterintuitive (...)
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  46.  25
    Suffering, Ethics, and the Body of Christ: Anointing as a Strategic Alternative Practice.M. T. Lysaught - 1996 - Christian Bioethics 2 (2):172-201.
    Within the moral/social order maintained and reproduced by biomedical ethics (i.e., the “peaceable community”), suffering is a senseless accident with no value. Insofar as suffering compromises the fundamental pillar of this order, namely, autonomy, it threatens the existence of the “peaceable community”. Consequently, biomedical ethics is only able to offer those who suffer one moral or practical response: that of elimination, embodied most vividly in the increasingly approved practice of assisted-suicide. Another moral/ social order, however, the “peaceable Kingdom” (...)
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  47.  42
    Disease, Suffering, and Sin: One Anglican's Perspective.Claire Foster - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (2):157-163.
    This article explores some of the implications of understanding sin as failure of perception. The theological underpinning of the argument is the choice made in the Garden of Eden to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge rather than the fruit of the tree of life, or wisdom. This has led to distorted perception, in which all things are seen as having separate, independent existences rather than joined together by their common divine source and their deep interrelatedness in the (...)
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  48.  7
    Sin, Suffering, and the Need for the Theological Virtues.David Jones - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (2):187-198.
    This article examines the account of the relationship between sin and suffering provided by J. L. A. Garcia in “Sin and Suffering in a Catholic Understanding of Medical Ethics,” in this issue. Garcia draws on the Catholic tradition and particularly on the thought of Thomas Aquinas, who remains an important resource for Catholic theology. Nevertheless, his interpretation of Thomas is open to criticism, both in terms of omissions and in terms of positive claims. Garcia includes those elements of (...)
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  49. Suffering Love.Nicholas Wolterstorff - 1988 - In Thomas V. Morris (ed.), Philosophy and the Christian Faith. Univ. Of Notre Dame Press. pp. 196--237.
     
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  50.  24
    Mental Suffering and the DSM-5: A Critical Review.Stijn Vanheule & Ignaas Devisch - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):975-980.
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