Results for 'survival of bodily death'

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  1.  33
    Survival of Bodily Death: A Question of Values: Raymond Martin.Raymond Martin - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (2):165-184.
    Does anyone ever survive his or her bodily death ? Could anyone? No speculative questions are older than these, or have been answered more frequently or more variously. None have been laid to rest more often, or — in our times — with more claimed decisiveness. Jay Rosenberg, for instance, no doubt speaks for many contemporary philosophers when he claims, in his recent book, to have ‘ demonstrated ’ that ‘ we cannot [even] make coherent sense of the (...)
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  2.  4
    Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death.F. W. H. Myers, Susy Smith & Aldous Huxley - 1961 - Journal of Philosophy 58 (20):598-599.
  3.  16
    Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death[REVIEW]M. W. J. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):345-345.
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  4.  15
    Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death[REVIEW]C. J. Ducasse - 1961 - Journal of Philosophy 58 (20):598-599.
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  5.  37
    Survival of Bodily Death: A Question of Values.Raymond Martin - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (2):165 - 184.
  6. Human Personality and its survival of bodily Death.Frederic W. H. Meyers - 1905 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 13 (2):257-282.
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  7.  1
    Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death.I. Woodbridge Riley - 1903 - Psychological Review 10 (5):556-565.
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  8. F. W. H. Myers, Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death[REVIEW]W. Mcdougall - 1903 - Mind 12:513.
     
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  9. Mr. FW Myers on'Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death'.G. F. Stout - 1903 - Hibbert Journal 2:45-56.
     
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  10. The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death.Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) - 2015 - Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength (...)
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  11. Life After Death and the Devastation of the Grave.Eric T. Olson - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 409-423.
    This paper—written for nonspecialist readers—asks whether life after death is in any sense possible given the apparent fact that after we die our remains decay to the point where only randomly scattered atoms remain. The paper argues that this is possible only if our remains are not in fact dispersed in this way, and discusses how that might be the case. -/- 1. Life After Death -- 2. Total Destruction -- 3. The Soul -- 4. Body-Snatching -- 5. (...)
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  12.  3
    Mind, Mortality and Material Being van Inwagen and the Dilemma of Material Survival of Death.Paul Anders - 2011 - Sophia 50 (1):25-37.
    Many religiously minded materialist philosophers have attempted to understand the doctrine of the survival of death from within a physicalist approach. Their goal is not to show the doctrine false, but to explain how it can be true. One such approach has been developed by Peter van Inwagen. After explaining what I call the duplication objection, I present van Inwagen’s proposal and show how a proponent might attempt to solve the problem of duplication. I argue that the very (...)
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  13. The Pluralizability Objection to a New-Body Afterlife.Theodore M. Drange - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 405-408.
    This paper presents and defends that an afterlife in which a person receives a new body after his or her old body is destroyed (as it is on some notions of bodily resurrection) is conceptually impossible. The main idea behind this argument is that such an afterlife would conceptually require that a person be a kind of thing that could be rendered plural. But since persons are not that type of thing, such an afterlife is not conceptually possible.
     
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  14.  2
    Mother's Death and Child Survival: The Case of Early Quebec.Samuel Pavard, Alain Gagnon, Bertrand Desjardins & Evelyne Heyer - 2005 - Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (2):209-227.
    The aim of this paper is to account for the effect of mother's death on child survival in a historical population. Using comprehensive data on the early French Canadian population of Quebec, evidence is provided for a higher risk of dying for motherless children that remains significant over all childhood and long after the death of the mother. The specific effect of the loss of maternal care was estimated by comparing mortality before and after mother's death, (...)
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  15.  26
    Near-Death Experiences and the Problem of Evidence for Survival After Death.Chris Cherry - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):397.
    Many people believe it absurd to seek evidence for - or against - personal survival of death. Some do so because they think, for a variety of reasons, that the idea of personal post-mortem survival makes no sense. Whether or not they are right they are at any rate consistent: nothing can be evidence for or against a nonsense. However, there are others who also believe that looking for evidence is absurd and yet do not similarly dismiss (...)
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  16.  64
    Personal Identity and the Survival of Death.Dean Zimmerman - 2013 - In Fred Feldman Ben Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. pp. 97.
  17.  15
    Addition of Time‐Dependent Covariates to a Survival Model Significantly Improved Predictions for Daily Risk of Hospital Death.Jenna Wong, Monica Taljaard, Alan J. Forster, Gabriel J. Escobar & Carl van Walraven - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):351-357.
  18.  35
    Personal Survival of Death--An Analysis.Robert H. Ayers - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 47 (3):331-339.
  19. The Survival of Human Consciousness: Essays on the Possibility of Life After Death.Lance Storm & Michael A. Thalbourne - 2006 - McFarland.
  20.  9
    Seeking Subsistence Beyond Death: The Ethical Implications of an Egotistic Drive for Personal Survival.Geoffrey Karabin - 2010 - Social Philosophy Today 26:135-148.
    The Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno and the American social scientist Ernest Becker see death as humanity’s fundamental anxiety. My essay explores the ethical ramifications attendant upon making that anxiety a well-spring of human activity. More specifically, I am interested in humanity’s effort to escape death via the secular milieu of social remembrance. Does such an effort produce a vista where the other exhibits an intrinsic value? Alternatively, does the other become a mere means in light of one’s (...)
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  21. In Defense of the Loss of Bodily Integrity as a Criterion for Death: A Response to the Radical Capacity Argument.Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2009 - The Thomist 73 (4):647-659.
     
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  22.  8
    Philosophical Problems with Disembodied Existence and Survival of Death.Janusz Salamon - 2006 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 11:81-94.
  23.  2
    Problems with Disembodied Existence and Survival of Death.Janusz Salamon - 2006 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 11:81-91.
  24.  7
    Why the Body has a Mind and the Survival of Consciousness After Death.Morton Prince - 1928 - Mind 37 (145):1-20.
  25. New Facts on Our Survival of Death.John Graham - 1908 - Hibbert Journal 7:261.
     
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  26.  5
    Evolution, Adaptation and Survival: The Very Slow Death of the American Charcoal Iron Industry.Richard H. Schallenberg - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (4):341-358.
    The last charcoal iron blast furnace in the United States shut down in 1945. The most obvious reason for the extraordinary longevity of this industry was the almost unlimited supply of virgin timber in the United States. Although an obvious explanation, it is deceptive. The much more crucial reason for the longevity of the American charcoal iron industry was the technical difficulties involved in adapting coke- and coal-smelted iron to existing industrial processes. Until these technological problems could be overcome, charcoal (...)
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  27.  23
    Death Camp Survival and the Possibility of Hope.Marie Baird - 1997 - Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):385-419.
    This paper will argue that many survivors’ ability to take up their existence hopefully is rooted in the deeply visceral and unintegrable memory of “living the existence of a walking corpse” (Niederland 1968b, 12) that constitutes the ontic basis for their most fundamental presence to self, others, and God. I will show, secondly, that Karl Rahner’s theological formulation of witness as “an act of self transcendence in which the subject reaches up to the unsurpassable and sovereign Mystery which we call (...)
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  28.  3
    Relationship Between Survival Status of First Child and Subsequent Child Death.M. M. Rahman, M. Kabir & R. Amin - 1996 - Journal of Biosocial Science 28 (2):185-191.
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  29. Mind, Matter, and Death: Cognitive Neuroscience and the Problem of Survival.Douglas M. Stokes - 1993 - Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 87:41-84.
  30. Death Survival and Immortality in the Works of Marcez, Gabriel (Vol 41, Pg 677, 1993).P. Bendlova - 1993 - Filosoficky Casopis 41 (6):1100-1100.
  31. BARRETT, W. F. -The Threshold of the Unseen; an Examination of the Phenomena of Spiritualism and of the Evidence for Survival After Death[REVIEW]F. C. S. Schiller - 1918 - Mind 27:503.
     
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  32. Both the Survival Scenario and the Death Scenario Improve Memory Recall Regardless of the Processing/Priming Paradigm.Xiaolin Zhao, Hao Li, Xinxin Zhang & Juan Yang - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  33.  19
    In Defense of the Reverence of All Life: Heideggerean Dissolution of the Ethical Challenges of Organ Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death[REVIEW]D. J. Isch - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):441-459.
    During the past 50 years since the first successful organ transplant, waiting lists of potential organ recipients have expanded exponentially as supply and demand have been on a collision course. The recovery of organs from patients with circulatory determination of death is one of several effective alternative approaches recommended to reduce the supply-and-demand gap. However, renewed debate ensues regarding the ethical management of the overarching risks, pressures, challenges and conflicts of interest inherent in organ retrieval after circulatory determination of (...)
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  34. Why Survival is Metaphysically Impossible.Raymond D. Bradley - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 297-328.
    Human bodies have a totally different mode of existence from those collections of mental properties (intelligence, will power, consciousness, etc.) that we call minds. They belong to the ontological category of physical substances or entities, whereas mental properties belong to the ontological category of properties or attributes, and as such can exist only so long as their physical bearers exist. Mental properties “emerge” (in a sense that makes emergence ubiquitous throughout the natural world) when the constituent parts of a biological (...)
     
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  35.  41
    A Defense of Brain Death.Nada Gligorov - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (2):119-127.
    In 1959 two French neurologists, Pierre Mollaret and Maurice Goullon, coined the term coma dépassé to designate a state beyond coma. In this state, patients are not only permanently unconscious; they lack the endogenous drive to breathe, as well as brainstem reflexes, indicating that most of their brain has ceased to function. Although legally recognized in many countries as a criterion for death, brain death has not been universally accepted by bioethicists, by the medical community, or by the (...)
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  36. Theories of Consciousness & Death.Gregory Nixon (ed.) - 2016 - New York, USA: QuantumDream.
    What happens to the inner light of consciousness with the death of the individual body and brain? Reductive materialism assumes it simply fades to black. Others think of consciousness as indicating a continuation of self, a transformation, an awakening or even alternatives based on the quality of life experience. In this issue, speculation drawn from theoretic research are presented. -/- Table of Contents Epigraph: From “The Immortal”, Jorge Luis Borges iii Editor’s Introduction: I Killed a Squirrel the Other Day, (...)
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  37.  22
    Imagination and Memory in Marsilio Ficinos Theory of the Vehicles of the Soul1.Anna Corrias - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (1):81-114.
    Abstract The ancient Neoplatonic doctrine that the rational soul has one or more vehicles—bodies of a semi-material nature which it acquires during its descent through the spheres—plays a crucial part in Marsilio Ficino's philosophical system, especially in his theory of sense-perception and in his account of the afterlife. Of the soul's three vehicles, the one made of more or less rarefied air is particularly important, according to Ficino, during the soul's embodied existence, for he identifies it with the spiritus , (...)
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  38.  37
    On the Horns of a Dilemma: Bodily Resurrection or Disembodied Paradise?James T. Turner Jr - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (5):406-421.
    In the sixteenth century, Sir Thomas More criticized Martin Luther’s purported denial of a conscious intermediate state between bodily death and bodily resurrection. In the same century, William Tyndale penned a response in defense of Luther’s view. His argument essentially defended the proposition: If the Intermediate State obtains, then bodily resurrection is superfluous for those in the paradisiacal state. In this article, I enter the fray and argue for the truth of this conditional claim. And, like (...)
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  39.  17
    'Typical Dreams' Reflections of Arousal.Rainer Schonhammer - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):18-37.
    Dreams of chase or pursuit, falling, sex, flying, nudity, failing an examination, one's own and other's death, fire, teeth falling out and some other themes experienced, even if only rarely, by many people all over the world have been labelled 'typical dreams'. This essay argues that typical dreaming, rather a syndrome of themes than monothematic, reflects an extraordinary state of mind and brain. Odd and particularly memorable perceptions, as well as emerging awareness of sleep and dreaming -- i.e. parallels (...)
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  40. Futures of Life Death on Earth: Derrida's General Ecology.Philippe Lynes - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book offers the first philosophical treatment of biocultural sustainability and eco-deconstruction, presenting the most developed treatment of the notions of survival and life death in Derrida to date.
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  41.  6
    Ideas and Strategies of Discursive Equalization of Life and Death.Gordana Djeric - 2003 - Filozofija I Društvo 2003 (21):247-258.
    By analyzing discursive equalization of the categories of life and death in different spoken and written genres in the 1990s, the author uncovers a number of ideas and strategies around which the discourses guided by this phenomenon are structured. The first part of the paper is aimed at understanding the relation of these categories in Serbian folk culture and possible influences of the latter on recent articulations of the examined phenomenon. In the second part of the paper the central (...)
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  42. Love of Life: Deconstruction, Biotech & the Survival of Indefinite Life.Adam R. Rosenthal - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):156-180.
    Derrida's concept of survival, born out of Benjamin's work on translation in The Task of the Translator, has become a fixed element of readings of his work in recent years. Of particular interest in his final seminars on The Beast and the Sovereign and The Death Penalty, survival might be said to do to the concept of life what writing had done to that of speech. In this essay, I explore how the Derridean concept of survival, (...)
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  43.  86
    The Death of Whole-Brain Death: The Plague of the Disaggregators, Somaticists, and Mentalists.Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):353 – 378.
    In its October 2001 issue, this journal published a series of articles questioning the Whole-Brain-based definition of death. Much of the concern focused on whether somatic integration - a commonly understood basis for the whole-brain death view - can survive the brain's death. The present article accepts that there are insurmountable problems with whole-brain death views, but challenges the assumption that loss of somatic integration is the proper basis for pronouncing death. It examines three major (...)
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  44.  91
    Human Identity, Immanent Causal Relations, and the Principle of Non-Repeatability: Thomas Aquinas on the Bodily Resurrection.Christina van Dyke - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (4):373 - 394.
    Can the persistence of a human being's soul at death and prior to the bodily resurrection be sufficient to guarantee that the resurrected human being is numerically identical to the human being who died? According to Thomas Aquinas, it can. Yet, given that Aquinas holds that the human being is identical to the composite of soul and body and ceases to exist at death, it's difficult to see how he can maintain this view. In this paper, I (...)
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  45.  14
    Monism and the Possibility of Life After Death: BRUCE R. REICHENBACH.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (1):27-34.
    Traditionally, when persons were viewed as a psycho-physical unity, life after death was deemed quite impossible, particularly in the face of universal human mortality and inevitable bodily corruption. However, some modern anthropologically monistic philosophers, including most notably John Hick, have argued that life after death is possible Two objections have been raised against the re-creationist thesis that the individual human person can be re-created after death. The objection that the re-created person would not be the same (...)
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  46.  42
    Death and the Evolution of Language.Luca Berta - 2010 - Human Studies 33 (4):425-444.
    My hypothesis is that the cognitive challenge posed by death might have had a co-evolutionary role in the development of linguistic faculties. First, I claim that mirror neurons, which enable us to understand others’ actions and emotions, not only activate when we directly observe someone, but can also be triggered by language: words make us feel bodily sensations. Second, I argue that the death of another individual cannot be understood by virtue of the mirror neuron mechanism, since (...)
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  47.  29
    The Ghost in the Machine Is the Elephant in the Room: Souls, Death, and Harm at the End of Life.R. Disilvestro - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):480-502.
    The idea that we human beings have souls that can continue to have conscious experiences after the deaths of our bodies is controversial in contemporary academic bioethics; this idea is obviously present whenever questions about harm at the end of life are discussed, but this idea is often ignored or avoided because it is more comfortable to do so. After briefly discussing certain types of experiences that lead some people to believe in souls that can survive the deaths of their (...)
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  48.  62
    The Death of Philosophy: A Response to Stephen Hawking.Callum D. Scott - 2012 - South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):385-404.
    In his 2010 work, The Grand Design, Stephen Hawking, argues that ‘… philosophy is dead’. While not a Philosopher, Hawking provides strong argument for his thesis, principally that philosophers have not taken science sufficiently seriously and so Philosophy is no longer relevant to knowledge claims. In this paper, Hawking’s claim is appraised and critiqued, becoming a meta-philosophical discussion. It is argued that Philosophy is dead, in some sense, due to particular philosophers having embarked on an intellectual path no longer in (...)
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  49. Life, Death, and the Hiddenness of God.Robert Oakes - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):155 - 160.
    Many philosophers have contended that (traditional) theism or supernaturalism suffers from what can properly be called the Problem of Divine Hiddenness (the PDH ). [See Howard-Snyder and Moser 2002]. Moreover, it is the contention of many proponents of the PDH that this “problem,” if, indeed, not just a component of the “problem of evil,” bears a striking similarity to the latter. Specifically, at the heart of this ostensible difficulty for theism is that Divine “Hiddenness,” like pain and suffering—or at least (...)
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  50.  18
    William James and the Search for Scientific Evidence of Life After Death.Gary E. Schwartz - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    William James’s historic fascination with psychic phenomena, including the possibility of life after death, has become more widely known with the publication of recent books and articles on this controversial aspect of his scientific legacy. However, little is known about the emerging evidence suggesting the possibility that James’s scientific interest in these topics has not waned since he died. This paper reviews preliminary observations, including two exploratory double-blinded mediumship investigations, which are consistent with the hypothesis that James (with others) (...)
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