Results for 'tachistoscopic recognition thresholds'

1000+ found
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  1.  3
    Tachistoscopic recognition thresholds as a function of arousal level.Gary W. Patton - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):354.
  2.  13
    Tachistoscopic recognition thresholds, paired-associate learning, and free recall as a function of abstractness-concreteness and word frequency.Wilma A. Winnick & Kenneth Kressel - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (2):163.
  3.  3
    Effects of differential training on tachistoscopic recognition thresholds.Robert L. Sprague - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (3):227.
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  4.  22
    Frequency of usage as a determinant of recognition thresholds for words.Richard L. Solomon & Leo Postman - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (3):195.
  5.  12
    Visual recognition thresholds as a function of verbal ability and word frequency.Charles D. Spielberger & J. Peter Denny - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (6):597.
  6.  26
    Visual-recognition thresholds as a function of word length and word frequency.Elliot McGinnies, Patrick B. Comer & Oliver L. Lacey - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (2):65.
  7.  7
    Children's tachistoscopic recognition of words and pseudowords varying in pronounceability and consonant-vowel sequence.Hoben Thomas - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):511.
  8.  24
    Left-right differences in tachistoscopic recognition.M. P. Bryden & Christopher A. Rainey - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (6):568.
  9.  4
    Left-right differences in tachistoscopic recognition as a function of order of report, expectancy, and training.Cecil M. Freeburne & Roy D. Goldman - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):570.
  10.  13
    Left-right differences in tachistoscopic recognition as a function of familiarity and pattern orientation.M. P. Bryden - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (1):120.
  11.  16
    Two kinds of response priming in tachistoscopic recognition.Wilma A. Winnick & Stephen A. Daniel - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (1):74.
  12.  20
    Stimulus information and contextual information as determinants of tachistoscopic recognition of words.Endel Tulving & Cecille Gold - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):319.
  13.  20
    Parallel and serial processing in tachistoscopic recognition: Two mechanisms.A. O. Dick - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):60.
  14.  10
    Effects of same-different patterns on tachistoscopic recognition of letters.Robert P. Ingalls - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):209.
  15.  14
    Relations between the sensory register and short-term storage in tachistoscopic recognition.A. O. Dick - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):279.
  16.  6
    Signal detection approach to the study of retinal locus in tachistoscopic recognition.Wilma A. Winnick & Gerard E. Bruder - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (3p1):528.
  17.  11
    Scanning, chunking, and the familiarity effect in tachistoscopic recognition.D. J. Mewhort - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):69.
  18.  21
    Visual field position and word-recognition threshold.Willis Overton & Morton Wiener - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (2):249.
  19.  6
    The effects of punishment upon syllable recognition thresholds.William Lysak - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (5):343.
  20.  13
    Effects of previously associated annoying stimuli (auditory) on visual recognition thresholds.Julian Hochberg & Virginia Brooks - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):490.
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  21. Repetition does not improve word-recognition thresholds.Jw Whitlow & A. Cebollero - 1986 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):338-339.
     
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  22.  2
    Personality and perception in the recognition threshold paradigm.Bernhard Kempler & Morton Wiener - 1963 - Psychological Review 70 (4):349-356.
  23.  9
    Influence of set in tachistoscopic threshold determination.Peter A. Ornstein & Wilma A. Winnick - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):504.
  24.  7
    Recognition memory for novel forms following continuous or intermittent tachistoscopic viewing.Terence D. Creighton - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (3):182-184.
  25.  15
    Short-term, perceptual-recognition memory for tachistoscopically presented nonsense forms.Richard A. Steffy & Charles W. Eriksen - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):277.
  26.  8
    Hemiretinal effects in tachistoscopic letter recognition.D. O. Neil, H. Sampson & J. A. Gribben - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):129.
  27. Signal-Detection, Threshold, and Dual-Process Models of Recognition Memory: ROCs and Conscious Recollection.Andrew P. Yonelinas, Ian Dobbins, Michael D. Szymanski, Harpreet S. Dhaliwal & Ling King - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):418-441.
    Threshold- and signal-detection-based models have dominated theorizing about recognition memory. Building upon these theoretical frameworks, we have argued for a dual-process model in which conscious recollection and familiarity contribute to memory performance. In the current paper we assessed several memory models by examining the effects of levels of processing and the number of presentations on recognition memory receiver operating characteristics . In general, when the ROCs were plotted in probability space they exhibited an inverted U shape; however, when (...)
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  28.  31
    Word recognition as a function of retinal locus.Mortimer Mishkin & Donald G. Forgays - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (1):43.
  29.  18
    A threshold difference produced by a figure-ground dichotomy.Bernard Weitzman - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (2):201.
  30.  21
    Recognition of words and homonyms as a function of amount of preexposure.Donald Keller & Murray Glanzer - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):160.
  31.  8
    Some sources of artifact in studies of the tachistoscopic perception of words.Jan Pierce - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):363.
  32.  58
    Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach.Christopher Preston & Wylie Carr - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (3):308-323.
    ABSTRACTGiven the existing inequities in climate change, any proposed climate engineering strategy to solve the climate problem must meet a high threshold for justice. In contrast to an overly thin paradigm for justice that demands only a science-based assessment of potential temperature-related benefits and harms, we argue for the importance of attention to recognitional justice. Recognitional justice, we go on to claim, calls for a different type of assessment tool. Such an assessment would pay attention to neglected considerations such as (...)
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  33.  15
    Recognition of numerals imbedded in words, pronounceable nonwords, and random sequences of letters.Edward Lakner - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (6):1086.
  34.  11
    The "20-questions" technique: Prediction of visual threshold and measurement of redundancy.Robert H. Keen - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):158.
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  35.  21
    Accuracy of recognition with alternatives before and after the stimulus.Douglas H. Lawrence & George R. Coles - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):208.
  36.  5
    Relationship between recognition accuracy and order of reporting stimulus dimensions.Douglas H. Lawrence & David L. Laberge - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (1):12.
  37. English Phrase Speech Recognition Based on Continuous Speech Recognition Algorithm and Word Tree Constraints.Haifan Du & Haiwen Duan - 2021 - Complexity 2021:1-11.
    This paper combines domestic and international research results to analyze and study the difference between the attribute features of English phrase speech and noise to enhance the short-time energy, which is used to improve the threshold judgment sensitivity; noise addition to the discrepancy data set is used to enhance the recognition robustness. The backpropagation algorithm is improved to constrain the range of weight variation, avoid oscillation phenomenon, and shorten the training time. In the real English phrase sound recognition (...)
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  38.  13
    The effect of competition on visual duration threshold and its independence of stimulus frequency.Leston L. Havens & Warren E. Foote - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):6.
  39. Marxism and Cultural Studies in the Development of Axel Honneth’s Theory of Recognition.Eleonora Piromalli - 2012 - Culture, Theory, and Critique 52 (3):249-263.
    This essay analyses the interaction between Marxism and Cultural Studies in the genesis of Honneth’s theory of recognition. I reconstruct the passages through which Honneth, by drawing on the writings of some of the major cultural theorists and in reference to the works of the young Marx, develops the conceptual foundations of his paradigm (I), with special attention to the themes of social labour and the relationship between work and recognition (II). I then point out the epistemic and (...)
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  40.  1
    Notes on the semiotics of face recognition.Remo Gramigna & Cristina Voto - 2021 - Sign Systems Studies 49 (3-4):338-360.
    Perceiving and recognizing others via their faces is of pivotal importance. The ability to perceive others in the environment – to discern between friends and foes, selves and others – as well as to detect and seek to predict their possible moves, plans, and intentions, is a set of skills that has proved to be essential in the evolutionary history of humankind. The aim of this study is to explore the subject of face recognition as a semiotic phenomenon. The (...)
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  41.  8
    Accuracy of recognition of subliminal auditory stimuli.Jane W. Coyne, H. E. King, J. Zubin & C. Landis - 1943 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (6):508.
  42.  21
    Physiological need, word frequency, and visual duration thresholds.Lauren G. Wispé & Nicholas C. Drambarean - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (1):25.
  43.  3
    On Dynamic Pitch Benefit for Speech Recognition in Speech Masker.Jing Shen & Pamela E. Souza - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Previous work demonstrated that dynamic pitch (i.e., pitch variation in speech) aids speech recognition in various types of noises. While this finding suggests dynamic pitch enhancement in target speech can benefit speech recognition in noise, it is of importance to know what noise characteristics affect dynamic pitch benefit and who will benefit from enhanced dynamic pitch cues. Following our recent finding that temporal modulation in noise influences dynamic pitch benefit, we examined the effect of speech masker characteristics on (...)
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  44.  7
    The development of differential word recognition.Donald G. Forgays - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (3):165.
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  45.  1
    Do Age and Linguistic Status Alter the Effect of Sound Source Diffuseness on Speech Recognition in Noise?Meital Avivi-Reich, Rupinder Kaur Sran & Bruce A. Schneider - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    One aspect of auditory scenes that has received very little attention is the level of diffuseness of sound sources. This aspect has increasing importance due to growing use of amplification systems. When an auditory stimulus is amplified and presented over multiple, spatially-separated loudspeakers, the signal’s timbre is altered due to comb filtering. In a previous study we examined how increasing the diffuseness of the sound sources might affect listeners’ ability to recognize speech presented in different types of background noise. Listeners (...)
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  46.  1
    The Principle of Inverse Effectiveness in Audiovisual Speech Perception.Luuk P. H. van de Rijt, Anja Roye, Emmanuel A. M. Mylanus, A. John van Opstal & Marc M. van Wanrooij - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
    We assessed how synchronous speech listening and lipreading affects speech recognition in acoustic noise. In simple audiovisual perceptual tasks, inverse effectiveness is often observed, which holds that the weaker the unimodal stimuli, or the poorer their signal-to-noise ratio, the stronger the audiovisual benefit. So far, however, inverse effectiveness has not been demonstrated for complex audiovisual speech stimuli. Here we assess whether this multisensory integration effect can also be observed for the recognizability of spoken words. To that end, we presented (...)
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  47.  10
    The efficiency of utilization of visual information and the effects of stress.Austin Jones - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (6):428.
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  48.  12
    Response suppression in perceptual defense.Robert B. Zajonc - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (3):206.
  49.  21
    Sensory integration with and without reinforcement.Vernon O. Tyler - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (4):381.
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  50.  44
    Minimal Income as Basic Condition for Autonomy.Alessandro Pinzani - 2010 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 55 (1):9-20.
    In this paper I shall deal with the question of whether a State-granted minimal income (which is not the same as a basic income) is a necessary condition in order for individuals (1) to attain a basic level of autonomy; and (2) to develop capabilities that allow them to improve the quality of their life. As a theoretical basis for my analysis I shall use Honneth’s theory of recognition, Sen’s capability approach (also in the version offered by Nussbaum), and (...)
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