Results for 'teaching'

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  1. The Value of Teaching Moral Skepticism.Daniel Callcut - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):223-235.
    This article argues that introductory ethics classes can unwittingly create or confirm skeptical views toward morality. Introductory courses frequently include critical discussion of skeptical positions such as moral relativism and psychological egoism as a way to head off this unintended outcome. But this method of forestalling skepticism can have a residual (and unintended) skeptical effect. The problem calls for deeper pedagogical-cum-philosophical engagement with the underlying sources of skepticism. The paper provides examples of how to do this and explains the additional (...)
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  2. Teaching the Debate.Brian Besong - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):401-412.
    One very common style of teaching philosophy involves remaining publicly neutral regarding the views being debated—a technique commonly styled ‘teaching the debate.’ This paper seeks to survey evidence from the literature in social psychology that suggests teaching the debate naturally lends itself to student skepticism toward the philosophical views presented. In contrast, research suggests that presenting one’s own views alongside teaching the debate in question—or ‘engaging the debate’—can effectively avoid eliciting skeptical attitudes among students without sacrificing (...)
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  3. A Skill-Based Framework for Teaching Morality and Religion.Jason D. Swartwood - 2019 - Teaching Ethics 18 (1):39-62.
    One important aim of moral philosophy courses is to help students build the skills necessary to make their own well-reasoned decisions about moral issues. This includes the skill of determining when a particular moral reason provides a good answer to a moral question or not. Helping students think critically about religious reasons like “because God says so” and “because scripture explicitly says so” can be challenging because such lessons can be misperceived as coercive or anti-religious. I describe a framework for (...)
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  4. Teaching Philosophy Through Lincoln-Douglas Debate.Jacob Nebel, Ryan W. Davis, Peter van Elswyk & Ben Holguin - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289.
    This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are not inevitable, and (...)
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  5. Teaching Intellectual Virtues: Applying Virtue Epistemology in the Classroom.Heather Battaly - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):191-222.
    How can we cultivate intellectual virtues in our students? I provide an overview of virtue epistemology, explaining two types of intellectual virtues: reliabilist virtues and responsibilist virtues. I suggest that both types are acquired via some combination of practice on the part of the student and explanation on the part of the instructor. I describe strategies for teaching these two types of virtues in the classroom, including an activity for teaching the skill of using the square of opposition, (...)
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  6.  74
    Teaching Ethics, Happiness, and The Good Life: An Upbuilding Discourse in the Spirits of Soren Kierkegaard and John Dewey.Alexander Stehn - 2018 - In Steven M. Cahn, Alexandra Bradner & Andrew Mills (eds.), Philosophers in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 170-184.
    This essay narrates what I have learned from Søren Kierkegaard & John Dewey about teaching philosophy. It consists of three sections: 1) a Deweyan pragmatist’s translation of Kierkegaard’s religious insights on Christianity, as a way of life, into ethical insights on philosophy, as a way of life; 2) a brief description of the introductory course that I teach most frequently: Ethics, Happiness, & The Good Life; and 3) an exploration of three spiritual exercises from the course: a) self-cultivation by (...)
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  7. Polling as Pedagogy: Experimental Philosophy as a Valuable Tool for Teaching Philosophy.Thomas Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-58.
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the emerging field of “experimental philosophy,” in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons’ intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy—independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to actively engage with (...)
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  8. Teaching Philosophy Through a Role-Immersion Game.Kathryn E. Joyce, Andy Lamey & Noel Martin - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):175-98.
    A growing body of research suggests that students achieve learning outcomes at higher rates when instructors use active-learning methods rather than standard modes of instruction. To investigate how one such method might be used to teach philosophy, we observed two classes that employed Reacting to the Past, an educational role-immersion game. We chose to investigate Reacting because role-immersion games are considered a particularly effective active-learning strategy. Professors who have used Reacting to teach history, interdisciplinary humanities, and political theory agree that (...)
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  9.  28
    Changing Values in Teaching and Learning Philosophy: A Comparison of Historic and Current Education Approaches.Sarah Cashmore - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (2):145-167.
    This paper examines the pedagogical values inherent in various traditions of philosophy education, from the ancient Greeks to current practices in Ontario high schools, and asks whether our current educational practices are imparting the philosophical values we wish to bestow upon our learners. I compare the approaches of Socrates, Descartes, and Dewey on the nature of philosophy and the pedagogical frameworks they defend for transmitting the “spirit” of philosophy, and then examine the Ontario curriculum guidelines for the teaching of (...)
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  10.  38
    History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations.Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). In addition, although several (...)
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  11.  9
    Teaching Critical Thinking Virtues and Vices.Stuart Hanscomb - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (3):173-195.
    In the film and play Twelve Angry Men, Juror 8 confronts the prejudices and poor reasoning of his fellow jurors, exhibiting an unwavering capacity not just to formulate and challenge arguments, but to be open-minded, stay calm, tolerate uncertainty, and negotiate in the face of considerable group pressures. In a perceptive and detailed portrayal of a group deliberation a ‘wheel of virtue’ is presented by the characters of Twelve Angry Men that allows for critical thinking virtues and vices to be (...)
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  12.  27
    Teaching for Intellectual Virtue in Logic and Critical Thinking Classes.T. Ryan Byerly - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (1):1-27.
    Introductory-level undergraduate classes in Logic or Critical Thinking are a staple in the portfolio of many Philosophy programs. A standard approach to these classes is to include teaching and learning activities focused on formal deductive and inductive logic, sometimes accompanied by teaching and learning activities focused on informal fallacies or argument construction. In this article, I discuss a proposal to include an additional element within these classes—namely, teaching and learning activities focused on intellectual virtues. After clarifying the (...)
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  13.  92
    On Teaching Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit.Jonathan Schonsheck - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (3):219-246.
    In an effort to meet the challenge of teaching philosophy to non-majors by both keeping their attention and maintaining philosophical integrity, this paper defends an interpretation of Jean-Paul Sartre’s “No Exit” and articulates a method for teaching key concepts in existentialism, e.g. freedom, bad faith, authenticity, etc. The paper offers a “case study” method of teaching “No Exit” by providing three interpretations of the play: a literal interpretation, a philosophical interpretation that is ultimately regarded untenable, and a (...)
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  14.  23
    Learner Outcome Attainment in Teaching Applied Ethics Versus Case Methodology.Brian J. Huschle - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):243-262.
    The primary purpose of this study is to identify differences in at­tainment of learning outcomes for ethics courses delivered using two distinct teaching approaches. The first approach uses a case based method in the context of applied moral issues within medical practice. The second approach surveys moral theories in the context of applied moral issues. Significant differences are found in the attainment of learner outcomes between the two groups. In particular, attainment of outcomes related to moral decision-making is higher (...)
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  15.  57
    Teaching Empathy in Medical Ethics: The Use of “Lottery Assignments”.Deborah R. Barnbaum - 2001 - Teaching Philosophy 24 (1):63-75.
    Being empathetic is an important trait that allows for those working in health care professions to successfully analyze cases and provide patients with adequate care. One standard and enormously important way to try and teach empathy involves the use of case studies. The case-study approach, however, has some unique limitations in teaching empathy. This paper describes an activity where students are asked to imagine that they have contracted a specific disease through a process of random assignment. Having contracted a (...)
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  16.  36
    Suggestions for Teaching a Course on Lincoln’s Ethics.Thomas Carson - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (3):235-252.
    There are many advantages of teaching ethics in connection with detailed biographical studies of historical figures; Lincoln is a particularly good subject for this sort of exercise. This paper describes a course on Lincoln’s ethics. I give suggestions for those who are interested in teaching such a course or in using aspects of Lincoln’s life as examples in ordinary ethics classes. I offer suggestions about readings and a list of fruitful and interesting topics for debate and discussion that (...)
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  17. Teaching Kant’s Ethics.Lisa Cassidy - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):305-318.
    This pedagogical study analyzes and attempts to solve some difficulties of teaching Immanuel Kant’s Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. Even though there are obstacles to teaching Kant’s ethics, I argue that active learning techniques can overcome such obstacles. The active learning approach holds that students learn better by doing (in hands-on exercises) than just by listening (to a professor’s lectures). Twelve lesson plans are outlined in this article. The lesson plans are activities to explore and learn, then (...)
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  18.  43
    Deliberating with Critical Friends: A Strategy for Teaching Deliberative Democratic Theory.Shane Ralston - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):393-410.
    Standard methods for teaching Deliberative Democratic Theory in the philosophy classroom include presenting theories in the historical order in which they originated, by theorist or in various thematic categories, including criticisms of the theories. However, if Simone Chambers is correct and DDT has truly entered “a working theory stage,” whereby the theory and practice of deliberation receive equal consideration, then such approaches may no longer be appropriate for teaching DDT. I propose that DDT be taught using the Critical (...)
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  19.  59
    Teaching Daoism as Philosophy: Teaching Thinking Through Controversy.Alan Fox - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):1-28.
    I propose to consider chapter 1 of the famous, classic, and foundational Daoist text Dao De Jing, attributed to Laozi, in order to enable a non-expert to negotiate the subject of Daoism in a global philosophy context, and to further enhance the teaching of philosophy by introducing and emphasizing at least some of the controversies that inevitably surround interpretation of a classical set of texts and ideas. This forces students to see through simplistic dichotomies and form subtler conclusions, on (...)
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  20.  35
    Socratic Teaching.Carrie-Ann Biondi - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):119-140.
    Socratic teaching is popularly understood as aggressively questioning randomly called-on students, but this is a model that many educators have moved away from. The focus has shifted to eliciting and facilitating critical dialogue among willing participants. I would argue that this helpful shift still misses an essential element of Socratic teaching that can be gleaned from some of Plato’s early dialogues. The most crucial dimension of Socrates’ pedagogy is the function of the educator as an exemplar. I develop (...)
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  21.  58
    Black Elk Speaks, John Locke Listens, and the Students Write: Designing and Teaching a Writing Intensive Introduction to Philosophy and Cultural Diversity.Lisa Bergin, Douglas Lewis, Michelle Martinez, Anne Phibbs, Pauline Sargent & Naomi Scheman - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (1):35-59.
    This paper details the experience of planning, orchestrating, teaching, and participating in a writing-intensive, team-taught, introductory philosophy class designed to expand the diversity of voices included in philosophical study. Accordingly, this article includes the various perspectives of faculty, TAs, and students in the class. Faculty authors discuss the administrative side of the course, including its planning and goals, its texts and structure, its working definition of “philosophy,” its balance of canonical and non-canonical texts, the significant resistance met in getting (...)
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  22.  37
    Socratic Teaching: Beyond the Paper Chase.Carrie-Ann Biondi - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):119-140.
    Socratic teaching is popularly understood as aggressively questioning randomly called-on students, but this is a model that many educators have moved away from. The focus has shifted to eliciting and facilitating critical dialogue among willing participants. I would argue that this helpful shift still misses an essential element of Socratic teaching that can be gleaned from some of Plato’s early dialogues. The most crucial dimension of Socrates’ pedagogy is the function of the educator as an exemplar. I develop (...)
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  23.  48
    Teaching To/By/About People with Disabilities: Introduction.Anita Silvers - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):341-344.
    To some students with disabilities who take philosophy classes, and even to some professors with disabilities who teach philosophy, the discipline is not welcoming. Philosophical theory traditionally recognizes so-called normal people and common modes of functioning but seems to ignore or disparage biologically anomalous individuals. The adequacy of our epistemological and ethical philosophies is a pressing reason for us to acknowledge disability in philosophical theorizing. And there are equally pressing reasons to acknowledge that students with various kinds of disabilities are (...)
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  24.  18
    Teaching Philosophy of the City.Gerald J. Erion - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):137-150.
    This paper reviews goals, content materials, and other essential elements of a new, experimental philosophy course on the built environment of cities now being developed in Buffalo, New York. Applying traditional philosophical methods, the course adds experiential components and expands philosophy’s scope in ways that promote deep learning about the city. A model unit on the work of Frederick Law Olmsted receives special attention here, as Olmsted’s work in Buffalo and elsewhere invites philosophical treatment—analysis, critical examination, and so on—from scholars, (...)
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  25.  44
    What Is Called Thinking?: Teaching the Joy of Philosophy.Robert C. Solomon - 2001 - Teaching Philosophy 24 (3):205-218.
    For many philosophy teachers, the joy of philosophy is the joy of putting forward and defending arguments. However, this paper argues that the core of philosophy consists in a set of problems that are distinctive not because of their logic but because they deal with profound emotions that define the human condition and, as such, manifest an apparent immunity to logical analysis. In putting forward this position, the paper describes the current “thinness” of philosophy, argues that the familiar characterization of (...)
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  26.  23
    Teaching Philosophy to Chinese Students in Mainland China as a Foreign Professor.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (4):407-435.
    In recent years, universities throughout the People’s Republic of China have begun actively seeking foreign professors to work full-time in their philosophy departments. This, coupled with the decrease in the number of job openings in philosophy across western Europe and North America, might very well lead to a sharp rise in the number of foreign faculty members in philosophy departments across mainland China. In this article I will outline three of the major difficulties facing philosophy teachers who have little or (...)
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  27.  39
    Teaching Applied Ethics Effectively.Mike McNulty - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (4):361-371.
    While the subject matter and conclusions of scholarly meta-ethical debate are of great import, it is quite difficult to convey this material to students in applied ethics courses where the principal teaching goals are an introduction to pressing moral dilemmas and to the critical thinking skills needed to approach them. After a brief discussion of common obstacles to teaching applied ethics, this paper presents two strategies for teaching applied ethics which remain faithful to the complexities of meta-ethical (...)
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  28.  31
    Teaching for Argumentative Thought.Shelagh Crooks - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):247-261.
    The conception of thought as a kind of argumentative dialogue has been influential in curricula designed to promote the development of thinking skills. Educators have sought to “teach” this kind of thinking by providing their students with opportunities to participate in argumentative exchange. This practice is based on the belief that thinking processes will mirror or mimic the interpersonal exchanges in which the thinker engages. In this article, another approach to teaching argumentative thought is developed. It is argued that (...)
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  29.  35
    An Outline for a Brief Teaching Demonstration: On the Distinction Between Ethics and Morality.Shane Ralston - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (1):15-26.
    In this article, I outline a teaching demonstration that lasts approximately twenty-two minutes, which a candidate can employ when interviewing for a position in ethics. Since job openings in ethics, and especially applied ethics, are becoming increasingly common, I think that this outline will be helpful to many candidates deliberating about the topic and structure of their future teaching demonstrations. This demonstration is also especially well-suited to a search at a teaching institution, whether a community college, state (...)
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  30.  1
    The Impact of Team Teaching on Student Attitudes and Classroom Performance in Introductory Philosophy Courses.Aaron Kostko - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (4):329-354.
    Despite the growing interest in collaborative teaching in higher education, there is a paucity of research on its use and effectiveness in phi­losophy curricula. The research that does exist focuses almost exclusively on interdisciplinary collaboration or student and faculty attitudes regarding the practice. This paper aims to address these gaps by describing a semester long, multi-section study designed to assess the impact of team teaching on student classroom performance and related variables in an Introduction to Philosophy course. The (...)
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  31.  90
    Practical Suggestions for Teaching Small Philosophy Classes.Eddy Nahmias - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):59-65.
    This paper offers a number of tips for teaching small philosophy classes (under twenty-five students). Some of these include using a horseshoe seating arrangement, replacing hand-raising with name cards, engaging in “real” Socratic dialogues, having students create a philosophical “Question of the Day”, and assigning students “Critical Response” papers.
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  32.  32
    Studying Science in Action: The Case for Using Cases in Teaching the Philosophy of Science.Rick Fairbanks - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):143-166.
    This paper describes the case-based approach to teaching philosophy of science courses and argues for its merits. The paper first presents a case study that debates whether the “shock features” of the Slate Islands in Lake Superior were formed by meteorite impact or have an endogenous origin, e.g. from explosive volcanic activity. Next, the virtues of the Slate-Island case are considered, e.g. the case is focused insofar as what is at stake is relatively clear and the case illustrates the (...)
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  33.  30
    The Case of the Slain President: Teaching Critical Thinking in Context.Kerry Walters - 1997 - Teaching Philosophy 20 (1):35-47.
    There are two necessary conditions for effective learning. First, learning must occur within a context. Second, a learner must be genuinely interested in the subject matter. In the case of critical thinking, studying problems in a textbook fails to meet both of these conditions. This paper presents a strategy for supplying context and motivation to critical thinking students: a semester-long investigation of the Kennedy assassination. After reviewing the perils of traditional, non-contextual teaching methods, the author argues that this strategy (...)
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  34.  29
    Bringing Ancient Philosophy to Life: Teaching Aristotelian and Stoic Theories of Responsibility.Priscilla K. Sakezles - 1997 - Teaching Philosophy 20 (1):1-17.
    This paper describes a strategy for getting students interested in ancient, especially Hellenistic, philosophy. While the works of Aristotle, the Stoics, the Skeptics, and the Epicureans may strike students as impossibly distant in time and thus far removed from their own personal concerns, students are always interested in the topics of free will and moral responsibility. Teaching the transition from Hellenic to Hellenistic philosophy through an emphasis on treatments of these topics engages students and makes feasible the teaching (...)
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  35.  14
    Strategies for Teaching Kant’s Metaphysics and Hume’s Skepticism in Survey Courses.C. D. Brewer - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):1-19.
    Teaching Kant’s metaphysics to undergraduates in a survey course can be quite challenging. Specifically, it can be daunting to motivate interest in Kant’s project and present his system in an accessible way in a short amount of time. Furthermore, comprehending some of the important features of his requires some understanding of Hume’s skepticism. Unfortunately, students often misunderstand the extent and relevance of Hume’s skepticism. Here, I offer three strategies for presenting Kant’s metaphysics as a response to Hume. First, I (...)
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  36.  21
    The Ambivalence Toward Teaching in the Early Years of the American Philosophical Association.James Campbell - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):53-68.
    This paper investigates whether philosophers ever regarded the teaching of philosophy as a central concern by considering the first decades of professional associations that ultimately merged into the American Philosophical Association . Before the APA, philosophical education was mostly devoted to the development of the Christian gentleman. Upon its founding, the APA’s first president took the central functions of the APA to promote original investigation, publication, and collaboration, rather than teaching. Despite Creighton’s position that teaching should not (...)
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  37.  33
    The Debiasing Agenda in Ethics Teaching.Bruce Maxwell - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):75-90.
    How should ethics educators respond to the picture of moral functioning that has emerged from the cognitive sciences of morality? A critical case study of an instance of knowledge transfer from social and cognitive psychology to the practice of teaching ethics, this paper assesses the answer that behavioral ethics gives to this question. The paper first summarizes the opposition that the notion of “teaching reasoning skills” meets in behavioral ethics and provides some examples of the research findings on (...)
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  38.  75
    The Importance of Humor in Teaching Philosophy.Al Gini - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):143-149.
    Philosophy and joke telling do not share the same pedigree, but both can have an allied function and purpose. Philosophy and joke telling can help us to organize, interpret, possibly understand, or, at least, hopefully face and confront the fundamental issues of existence.Let me be more precise about what I mean by using humor and jokes in teaching philosophy. Humor, joke telling, can serve as a narrative playlet to metaphorically illuminate a complex philosophical concept. However, every class should not (...)
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  39. Reply to Steven Cahn’s ‘The Ethics of Teaching: A Puzzle.Rick Repetti - 2004 - APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):18-19.
    Steven Cahn posed a puzzle in this issue of the APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy, asking whether philosophy professors are morally obliged to reason students out of presumably irrational religious beliefs, by analogy with a hypothetical case in which a young person has been led to believe she has a magnanimous uncle who she never met but who has the wherewithal to watch over her life from afar and protect her. I responded in a nuanced manner, but basically emphasizing (...)
     
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  40.  68
    A Method for Teaching Ethics.Eric Gampel - 1996 - Teaching Philosophy 19 (4):371-383.
    The author outlines a five-step method for teaching ethical reasoning in undergraduate ethic courses. The purpose of the method is to incite student engagement with abstract issues and to allow students to see the usefulness of ethical theory in their everyday lives. To accomplish this, the method aids students in the development of theories on their own positions concerning ethical issues.
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  41.  70
    Pedagogy and People-Seeds: Teaching Judith Jarvis Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion”.Scott Woodcock - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):213-235.
    Judith Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion” is one of the most widely taught papers in undergraduate philosophy, yet it is notoriously difficult to teach. Thomson uses simple terminology and imaginative thought experiments, but her philosophical moves are complex and sometimes difficult to explain to a class still mystified by the prospect of being kidnapped to save a critically ill violinist. My aim here is to identify four sources of difficulty that tend to arise when teaching this paper. In my (...)
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  42.  25
    Teaching as a Pragmatist: Relating Non-Foundational Theory and Classroom Practice.Shannon Sullivan - 1997 - Teaching Philosophy 20 (4):401-419.
    Drawing on the work of John Dewey, the author argues that if academic philosophers take seriously the claim that theory and practice are reciprocally determined, then they should take seriously the task of intelligently experimenting with teaching practices in order to refine theories of knowledge and, on this basis, improve teaching practices. This paper explores one way of relating non-foundational epistemology to classroom practices. The author elaborates a “transactional” model of knowledge, according to which knowledge is what arises (...)
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  43.  67
    Teaching Medical Ethics.Natalie Abrams - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):309-318.
    How one goes about teaching medical ethics greatly depends upon one's interpretation of the discipline itself. Before discussing pedagogical isslIes, the primary focus ofthe paper, I will address the question of what "philosophical" medical ethics is and is not. I will then suggest some alternative approac:hes forincluding such material in a variety of different contexts, including courses geared toward philosophy students, those focusing on undergraduate students preparing for careers in one of the health care professions, and those actually within (...)
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  44.  62
    Is Clarity Essential to Good Teaching?Aaron M. Clark - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (3):271-289.
    It is common to think that clarity is an essential ingredient of good teaching, meaning, in part, that good teachers always make it as easy as possible to follow what they say. We disagree. What we argue is that there are cases in which a philosophy teacher needs to forego clarity, making strategic use of obscurity in the undergraduate classroom.
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  45.  22
    Revolution Vs. Devolution in Kansas: Teaching in a Conservative Climate.Ann Cudd - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):173-183.
    This paper is about teaching progressive ideas where fundamentalist and conservative views are prominent among the students. I take up two questions: What should we take our task as feminist teachers to be? How should it be carried out? I explore three teaching strategies that a progressive teacher might use in a hostile conservative climate: the whole truth strategy, the dismissal strategy, and the bridge strategy. I reject the first two of these and argue that the third is (...)
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  46.  28
    Making Room for Women in Our Tools for Teaching Logic: A Proposal for Promoting Gender-Inclusiveness.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2015 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tools for Teaching Logic.
    Logic is one of the most male-dominated areas within the already hugely male-dominated subject of philosophy. Popular hypotheses for this disparity include a preponderance of confident, mathematically-minded male students in the classroom, the historical association between logic and maleness, and the lack of female role-models for students, though to date none of these have been empirically tested. In this paper I discuss the effects of various attempts to address these potential causes whilst teaching second-year formal and philosophical logic courses (...)
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  47.  56
    Teaching Logic as a Foreign Language On-Line.Katarzyna Paprzycka - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):117-125.
    Similar to learning the grammatical structures of a foreign language, one problem that students face in learning logic is that many of the operations and concepts they need to learn require more practice to fully master. To solve this problem, the author proposes the use of “repetitive exercises”, exercises that aim to develop a familiarity with a concept or operation through repeatedly focusing on that concept or operation. According to the author, the best method for implementing these exercises is the (...)
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  48.  52
    Teaching Philosophy as a Life Skill.Robert W. Bailor - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):119-130.
    This paper addresses the problem of the perceived irrelevance of philosophy to undergraduate students and advances a pedagogical strategy for making philosophy relevant. Teaching philosophy as the pursuit of life as meaningful, that is, as a life skill, frames philosophy as a relevant study of significant benefit to them. The overall goal of a course which approaches philosophy this way is to develop a “creative aptitude” in students. Thus, students do not learn philosophical lessons by wrote, but rather, like (...)
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  49.  52
    Teaching Philosophy Outside of the Classroom: One Alternative to Service Learning.Sarah K. Donovan - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):161-177.
    In this article I describe my experience teaching a moral problems course to first-year students within a Learning Community model. I begin with the learning goals and the mechanics of both my Learning Community and my moral problems course. I then focus on the experiential learning requirement of my Learning Community which is based on a field trip model instead of a service learning model. I describe how two field trips in particular—one to an Arab American community in Brooklyn, (...)
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  50.  16
    Teaching Taboo Topics.Alison Suen - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (1):87-102.
    In this paper, I offer justifications and strategies for teaching taboo, unpopular, or rarely contested views in undergraduate ethics courses. Teaching taboo topics, while challenging, forcefully demonstrates the commitment that few topics in ethics have obvious answers, and that the study of ethics is more than just debating right and wrong. Drawing from my experience teaching on the topic of bestiality, I articulate the importance of motivating topics that may appear remote and irrelevant to students. Inspired by (...)
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