Results for 'the U. S. Food'

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  1. The Ethics of Food: A Reader for the Twenty-First Century.Ronald Bailey, Wendell Berry, Norman Borlaug, M. F. K. Fisher, Nichols Fox, Greenpeace International, Garrett Hardin, Mae-Wan Ho, Marc Lappe, Britt Bailey, Tanya Maxted-Frost, Henry I. Miller, Helen Norberg-Hodge, Stuart Patton, C. Ford Runge, Benjamin Senauer, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Anthony J. Trewavas, the U. S. Food & Drug Administration - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In The Ethics of Food, Gregory E. Pence brings together a collection of voices who share the view that the ethics of genetically modified food is among the most pressing societal questions of our time. This comprehensive collection addresses a broad range of subjects, including the meaning of food, moral analyses of vegetarianism and starvation, the safety and environmental risks of genetically modified food, issues of global food politics and the food industry, and the (...)
     
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  2.  13
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the (...)
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  3.  25
    The Ethical Values in the U.S. Agricultural and Food System.Robert L. Zimdahl & Thomas O. Holtzer - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):549-557.
    Many segments of society have systems of values arising from collective beliefs and motivations. For agriculture, and our food system, increasing production to feed the growing human population clearly is a core value. However, a survey we conducted, together with a previously reported survey, showed that the curricula of most U.S. colleges of agriculture do not offer ethics courses that examine the basis of this core value or include discussion of agriculture’s ethical dilemmas such as misuse of pesticides, not (...)
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  4.  13
    The Precautionary Principle and the Regulation of U.S. Food and Drug Safety.Ed Soule - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):333 – 350.
    This article probes the advisability of regulating U.S. food and drug safety according to the precautionary principle. To do so, a precautionary regulatory regime is formulated on the basis of the beliefs that motivate most proponents of this initiative. That hypothetical regime is critically analyzed on the basis of an actual instantiation of a similarly stylized initiative. It will be argued that the precautionary principle entails regulatory constraints that are apt to violate basis tenets of political legitimacy. The modifications (...)
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  5. Frankenfood Free: Consumer Sovereignty, Federal Regulation and Industry Control in Marketing and Choosing Food in the U.S.Thomas O. McGarity - 2008 - In Paul Weirich (ed.), Labeling Genetically Modified Food: The Philosophical and Legal Debate. Oup Usa.
     
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  6.  22
    Blueprint for Transparency at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: Recommendations to Advance the Development of Safe and Effective Medical Products.Joshua M. Sharfstein, James Dabney Miller, Anna L. Davis, Joseph S. Ross, Margaret E. McCarthy, Brian Smith, Anam Chaudhry, G. Caleb Alexander & Aaron S. Kesselheim - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (s2):7-23.
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  7.  4
    Transparency at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.Robert M. Califf - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (s2):24-28.
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  8. The Ethics of Aid and Trade: U.S. Food Policy, Foreign Competition, and the Social Contract.Paul B. Thompson - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    The traditional military-territorial model of the nation state defines international duties in terms of protecting citizens' property from foreign threats. In this 1992 book about the principles of the US agricultural policy and foreign aid, Professor Thompson replaces this model with the notion of the trading state that sees its role in terms of the establishment of international institutions that stabilize and facilitate cultural and intellectual, as well as commercial, exchanges between nations. The argument focuses on protectionist challenges to foreign (...)
     
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  9.  50
    Genetically Modified Organisms and the U.S. Retail Food Labeling Controversy: Consumer Perceptions, Regulation, and Public Policy.Thomas A. Hemphill & Syagnik Banerjee - 2015 - Business and Society Review 120 (3):435-464.
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  10.  30
    Bill Winders: The Politics of Food Supply: U.S. Agricultural Policy in the World Economy. [REVIEW]Douglas H. Constance - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):455-456.
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  11.  16
    Inconsistent Regulatory Protection Under the U.S. Common Rule.Barbara J. Evans - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (4):366-379.
    U.S. regulations do not afford consistent protections to human research subjects. One complaint is that they focus on federally sponsored research, with private research covered only if it falls under the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration. This paper examines a deeper problem: Even when the regulations do apply, they still do not afford consistent standards of protection. The U.S. Common Rule and related FDA regulations lack a workable regulatory control mechanism.
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  12.  59
    The Corporate Social Responsibility of Pharmaceutical Product Recalls: An Empirical Examination of U.S. And U.K. Markets. [REVIEW]Eng Tuck Cheah, Wen Li Chan & Corinne Lin Lin Chieng - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):427-449.
    The pressure on companies to practice corporate social responsibility (CSR) has gained momentum in recent times as a means of sustaining competitive advantage in business. The pharmaceutical industry has been acutely affected by this trend. While pharmaceutical product recalls have become rampant and increased dramatically in recent years, no comprehensive study has been conducted to study the effects of announcements of recalls on the shareholder returns of pharmaceutical companies. As product recalls could significantly damage a company's reputation, profitability and brand (...)
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  13.  32
    Framing Animal Rights in the “Go Veg” Campaigns of U.S. Animal Rights Organizations.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):163-182.
    How much do animal rights activists talk about animal rights when they attempt to persuade America’s meat-lovers to stop eating nonhuman animals? This study serves as the basis for a unique evaluation and categorization of problems and solutions as framed by five major U.S. animal rights organizations in their vegan/food campaigns. The findings reveal that the organizations framed the problems as: cruelty and suffering; commodification; harm to humans and the environment; and needless killing. To solve problems largely blamed on (...)
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  14.  82
    The Love of Money, Satisfaction, and the Protestant Work Ethic: Money Profiles Among Univesity Professors in the U.S.A. And Spain. [REVIEW]Roberto Luna-Arocas & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):329-354.
    This study tests the hypothesis that university professors (lecturers) (in the U.S. and Spain) with different money profiles (based on Factors Success, Budget, Motivator, Equity, and Evil of the Love of Money Scale) will differ in work-related attitudes and satisfaction. Results suggested that Achieving Money Worshipers (with high scores on Factors Success, Motivator, Equity, and Budget) had high income, Work Ethic, and high satisfaction with pay level, pay administration, and internal equity comparison but low satisfaction with external equity comparison. Careless (...)
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  15.  39
    A Conceptual Foundation for Ethical Decision Making: A Stakeholder Perspective in the Lodging Industry (U.S.A.). [REVIEW]Randall S. Upchurch - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1349-1361.
    The purpose of this study was to build upon previous ethical research; thereby, advancing the hospitality industry's understanding of ethical decision making in lodging operations. In particular, this study reviewed: (a) the primary normative ethical precepts (i.e., egoism, benevolence, and principle) used as a criterion in ethical decision making, and (b) the predominant locus of analysis (e.g., individual, local, or cosmopolitan referent sources) used in applying ethical precepts to ethical decisions.The sample consisted of 500 lodging operations as randomly abstracted from (...)
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  16.  53
    Does The World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don’T?Mary K. Hendrickson, Harvey S. James & William D. Heffernan - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):311-328.
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to (...)
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  17.  21
    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649 - 684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was formally established, the Manhattan (...)
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  18.  46
    Environmental and Social Implications of Waste in U.S. Agriculture and Food Sectors.David Pimentel - 1990 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1):5-20.
    Because the agriculture/food sectors appear to be driven by short-term economic and political forces, cheap energy, and agricultural-chemical technologies, waste and environmental/social problems in the agricultural/food sectors are estimated to cost the nation at least $150 billion per year. Most of the waste and environmental/social problems can be eliminated through better resource management policies and the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices.
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  19.  43
    Utility of Ethical Frameworks in Determining Behavioral Intention: A Comparison of the U.S. And Russia.Rafik I. Beekun, Jim Westerman & Jamal Barghouti - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):235-247.
    Using Reidenbach and Robin‘s ( Journal of Business Ethics 7, 871–879, 1988) multi-criteria ethics instrument, we carried out the first empirical test of Robertson and Crittenden‘s (Strategic Management Journal 24, 385–392, 2003) cross-cultural map of moral philosophies to examine what ethical criteria guide business people in Russia and the U.S. in their intention to behave. Competing divergence and convergence hypotheses were advanced. Our results support a convergence hypothesis, and reveal a common emphasis on relativism. Americans are also influenced by the (...)
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  20.  55
    Business Ethics in Brazil and the U.S.: A Comparative Investigation. [REVIEW]Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham & Jeanne H. Yamamura - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):267 - 279.
    In this comparative survey of 126 Brazilian and U.S. business professionals, we explore the effect of national culture on ethical decision-making within the context of business. Using Reidenbach and Robin''s (1988) multi-criteria ethics instrument, we examined how these two countries'' differences on Hofstede''s individualism/collectivism dimension are related to the manner in which business practitioners make ethical decisions. Our results indicate that Brazilians and Americans evaluate the ethical content of actions or decisions differently when applying utilitarian criteria. By contrast, business people (...)
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  21.  21
    The Effect of the Governance Environment on Marketing Channel Behaviors: The Diamond Industries in the U.S., China, and Hong Kong. [REVIEW]Shaomin Li, Kiran Karande & Dongsheng Zhou - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):453 - 471.
    International differences in how market exchanges are conducted (e.g., the mode of entry, level of ownership, and conflict resolution) have been attributed mainly to national culture and cultural distance. However, the cultural arguments cannot explain why economies/countries with similar cultural backgrounds (e.g., Hong Kong and China) exhibit differences in exchange arrangements. Thus, the cultural arguments provide little strategic guidance to multinational corporations (MNCs) in international marketing. We propose that in addition to culture, the governance environment in a country, namely, the (...)
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  22.  47
    The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit.Patrick L. Taylor - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents and licenses. (...)
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  23. Equipping Police with Naloxone Spray and Decriminalizing All Opioid Use in the U.S.: An Ethical Analysis.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2018 - Journal of Healthcare Ethics and Administration 4 (2):17-25.
    The number of police departments carrying Narcan keeps increasing at a fast pace throughout the U.S., as it is considered an effective measure to fight the opioid epidemic. However, there have been strong oppositions to the idea of the police Narcan use. Still, in 2018, the nation is debating about it. Though not clearly visible to the public, there are important ethical arguments against the police Narcan use which necessarily involve understanding of the ethical roles and responsibilities of police as (...)
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  24.  54
    Exponential Growth, Animal Welfare, Environmental and Food Safety Impact: The Case of China’s Livestock Production. [REVIEW]Peter J. Li - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (3):217-240.
    Developmental states are criticized for rapid “industrialization without enlightenment.” In the last 30 years, China’s breathtaking growth has been achieved at a high environmental and food safety cost. This article, utilizing a recent survey of China’s livestock industry, illustrates the initiating role of China’s developmental state in the exponential expansion of the country’s livestock production. The enthusiastic response of the livestock industry to the many state policy incentives has made China the world’s biggest animal farming nation. Shortage of meat (...)
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  25.  1
    Remembering to Forget: The Historic Irresponsibility of U.S. Big Tobacco.Diego M. Coraiola & Robbin Derry - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Society increasingly demands corporations to be accountable for their past misbehaviours. Some corporations engage in forgetting work with the aim of avoiding responsibility for their wrongdoings. We argue that whenever social actors have their past actions called into question and engage in forgetting work, an ethics of remembering takes place. A collective project of social forgetting is contingent on the emergence of coordinated actions among players of an industry. Similarly, sustained efforts of forgetting work depend on the continuity of the (...)
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  26.  65
    Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China.William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265-284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (more specifically, (...)
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  27.  46
    Business Ethical Values in China and the U.S.Laura L. Whitcomb, Carolyn B. Erdener & Chen Li - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (8):839-852.
    The research presented in this paper focuses on business ethical values inChina, a country in which the process of institutional transformation has left cultural values in a state of flux. A survey was conducted in China and the U.S. by using five business scenarios. Survey results show similarities between the Chinese and American decision choices for three out of five scenarios. However, the results reveal significant differences in rationales, even forsimilar decisions. The implications of similarities and differences between the U.S. (...)
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  28.  10
    Genetically Engineered Animals and the Ethics of Food Labeling.Robert Streiffer & Alan Rubel - 2007 - In Paul Weirich (ed.), Labeling Genetically Modified Food: The Philosophical and Legal Debate. Oup Usa. pp. 63--87.
    The current debate about labeling genetically engineered (GE) food focuses on food derived from GE crops, neglecting food derived from GE animals. This is not surprising, as GE animal products have not yet reached the market. Participants in the debate may also be assuming that conclusions about GE crops automatically extend to GE animals. But there are two GE animals - the Enviropig and the AquAdvantage Bred salmon - that are approaching the market, animals raise more ethical (...)
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  29.  40
    How Do Small and Medium Enterprises Go “Green”? A Study of Environmental Management Programs in the U.S. Wine Industry.Mark Cordano, R. Scott Marshall & Murray Silverman - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):463-478.
    In industries populated by small and medium enterprises, managers' good intentions frequently incur barriers to superior environmental performance (Tilley, Bus Strategy Environ 8:238-248, 1999). During the period when the U.S. wine industry was beginning to promote voluntary adoption of sound environmental practices, we examined managers' attitudes, norms, and perceptions of stakeholder pressures to assess their intentions to implement environmental management programs (EMP). We found that managers within the simple structures of these small and medium firms are responsive to attitudes, norms, (...)
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  30.  67
    The Ethics of Organizations: A Longitudinal Study of the U.S. Working Population.Muel Kaptein - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):601-618.
    The ethics of organizations has received much attention in recent years. This raises the question of whether the ethics of organizations has also improved. In 1999, 2004, and 2008, a survey was conducted of 12,196 U.S. managers and employees. The results show that the ethical culture of organizations improved in the period between 1999 and 2004. Between 2004 and 2008 unethical behavior and its consequences declined and the scope of ethics programs expanded while ethical culture showed no significant improvement during (...)
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  31.  77
    The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms.Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497-527.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a dramatically expanding area of activity for managers and academics. Consumer demand for responsibly produced and fair trade goods is swelling, resulting in increased demands for CSR activity and information. Assets under professional management and invested with a social responsibility focus have also grown dramatically over the last 10 years. Investors choosing social responsibility investment strategies require access to information not provided through traditional financial statements and analyses. At the same time, a group of mainstream (...)
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  32. The U.S. Military-Industrial Complex is Circumstantially Unethical.Edmund F. Byrne - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):153 - 165.
    Business ethicists should examine not only business practices but whether a particular type of business is even prima facie ethical. To illustrate how this might be done I here examine the contemporary U.S. defense industry. In the past the U.S. military has engaged in missions that arguably satisfied the just war self-defense rationale, thereby implying that its suppliers of equipment and services were ethical as well. Some recent U.S. military missions, however, arguably fail the self-defense rationale. At issue, then, is (...)
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  33.  56
    The Impact of Corporate Ethical Values and Enforcement of Ethical Codes on the Perceived Importance of Ethics in Business: A Comparison of U.S. And Spanish Managers.Scott J. Vitell & Encarnación Ramos Hidalgo - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):31-43.
    This two country study examines the effect of corporate ethical values and enforcement of a code of ethics on perceptions of the role of ethics in the overall success of the firm. Additionally, the impact of organizational commitment and of individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism was examined. The rationale for examining the perceived importance of the role of ethics in this manner is to determine the extent to which the organization itself can influence employee perceptions regarding ethics (...)
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  34.  6
    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950.Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649-684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission was formally established, the Manhattan Project (...)
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  35.  45
    Corporate Citizenship Perspectives and Foreign Direct Investment in the U.S.Tammie S. Pinkston & Archie B. Carroll - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (3):157-169.
    As foreign direct investment in the U.S. continues to become both more visible and controversial, the general public remains skeptical about the corporate citizenship of these foreign affiliates. Four dimensions of corporate citizenship — orientations, organizational stakeholders, issues, and decision-making autonomy — were used to compare the inclinations of foreign affiliates with the domestic firms operating in the U.S. chemical industry. The only significant differences between the U.S. sample and those firms headquartered in other countries-of-origin were found in the area (...)
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  36.  40
    What Can We Learn From the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizational Ethics.Dove Izraeli & Mark S. Schwartz - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1045-1055.
    In November, 1991, the U.S. Congress enacted the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines legislation which had a dramatic impact on corporate America. Can the Guidelines be used as a model or framework by other countries? Could other countries in the world benefit from adopting a similar piece of legislation? Are there any limitations to consider? In addressing these issues, the authors make the argument that the time has arrived for other countries to consider the development of legislation similar to the Guidelines (...)
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  37.  19
    Are Conglomerates Less Environmentally Responsible? An Empirical Examination of Diversification Strategy and Subsidiary Pollution in the U.S. Chemical Industry.Robert S. Dooley & Gerald E. Fryxell - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):1 - 14.
    This study examines the relationship between corporate diversification strategy and the pollution activity of subsidiaries within the U.S. chemical industry using TRI data (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory). The subsidiaries of conglomerates were found to exhibit higher pollution levels for direct emissions than those of firms pursuing more related diversification strategies. Additionally, the subsidiaries of conglomerates exhibited more variance in overall pollution emissions compared to related diversified firms.
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  38.  31
    The Moral Warrior: Ethics and Service in the U.S. Military.Martin L. Cook - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    Explores the moral dimensions of the current global role of the U.S. military.
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  39.  22
    Addressing the Legacy of the U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee: Optimal Health in Health Care Reform Philosophy.Rueben C. Warren, Luther S. Williams & Wylin D. Wilson - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):496-500.
    This article is guided by principles and practices of bioethics and public health ethics focused on health care reform within the context of promoting Optimal Health. The Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care is moving beyond the traditions of bioethics to incorporate public health ethics and Optimal Health. It is imperative to remember the legacy of the ill-fated research entitled Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. Human participant research and health care must (...)
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  40.  45
    From Swords to Plowshares: An Evaluation of the U.S. Legislative Attempts on Economic Conversion and Human Resource Planning.S. Muthuchidambaram - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):1-26.
    This paper deals with the genesis, development, and impact of Military Keynesianism in the U.S. Its impact on the civilian sector is examined in terms of: geographical distribution of military spending, sectoral militarization, labor market and occupational distortion, the militarization of R & D, R & D's impact on American competitiveness in the international market, the parasitic role of the military contract system and the unethical and exploitative role of military contractors. This paper exarnines the issues related to disarmament and (...)
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  41.  9
    The Business – Government-Society Relationship: A Comparison Between China and the U.S.Jiyun Wu & D. Kirk Davidson - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:227-238.
    The paper compares the business-government-society relationship between China and the U.S. through the analysis of three cases: the tainted milk scandal in China, the beef recall in the U.S., and the peanut scandal in the U.S.
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  42.  33
    The U.S. War in Iraq, Just War Theory and Neoconservatism.Rodney G. Peffer - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 40:115-151.
    Given certain well-known empirical facts–including the Bush II administration’s motivations and its actions initiating the war – the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003 (and its continuing war of occupation) is not just (i.e., is not morally justified), on any standard interpretation of Just War Theory criteria for jus ad bellum. Since there was no imminent threat of attack by Iraq against the U.S., the U.S. invasion of Iraq was a Preventative or Merely Precautionary War (which is notrecognized by either (...)
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  43.  23
    Will You Really Protect Us Without a Gun? Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping in the U.S.Eli S. McCarthy - 2012 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 22 (2):29-48.
    The habits of direct violence in U.S. society continue to pose dangerous and dehumanizing trends. As scholars and activists cultivate alternatives to the use ofviolence, a key need involves providing direct experience for U.S. residents to explore and see the power of unarmed civilian peacekeeping. In this paper I ask the following questions: How can the international unarmed civilian peacekeeping models influence the U.S. in the form of domestic peace teams? What are the accomplishments and the challenges for local peace (...)
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  44.  28
    Why the U.S. Is Not the Best Country in the World.Steven D. Hales - 2006 - The Good Society 15 (2):35-40.
    In this article I consider the common claim that the United States is the best country in the world. I examine the factors of freedom, literacy, health, happiness, and wealth, and conclude that the U.S. is 13th best, and that actually Norway is the best country in the world.
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  45.  11
    Why is the Bishops' Letter on the U.S. Economy so Unconvincing?William S. Reece - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):553 - 560.
    This paper evaluates the rhetoric of the U.S. bishops' pastoral letter on the U.S. economy from two perspectives. Is the letter convincing? Does it conform to the conversational norms of civilization? The paper argues that the bishops' letter fails by both standards because it ignores serious research on the U.S. economy, it misstates important facts about the economy, and it sneers at professional economists. The paper concludes that the bishops' letter will not be convincing to well informed readers.
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  46.  67
    Bullying in the U.S. Workplace: Normative and Process-Oriented Ethical Approaches.Helen LaVan & Wm Marty Martin - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):147-165.
    Bullying is a serious problem in today’s workplace, in that, a large percentage of employees have either been bullied or knows someone who has. There are a variety of ethical concerns dealing with bullying—that is, courses of action to manage the bullying contain serious ethical/legal concerns. The inadequacies of legal protections for bullying in the U.S. workplace also compound the approaches available to deal ethically with bullying. While Schumann (2001, Human Resource Management Review 11, 93–111) does not explicitly examine bullying, (...)
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  47.  28
    Faith in the State? Asian Women’s Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K.Pragna Patel - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, and feminist (...)
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  48.  72
    Right to Food; Right to Feed; Right to Be Fed. The Intersection of Women's Rights and the Right to Food.Penny Van Esterik - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):225-232.
    This paper explores conceptual and practical linkages between women and food, and argues that food security cannot be realized until women are centrally included in policy discussions about food. Women's special relationship with food is culturally constructed and not a natural division of labor. Women's identity and sense of self is often based on their ability to feed their families and others; food insecurity denies them this right. Thus the interpretation of food as a (...)
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  49.  35
    The Ethics of Food for Tomorrow: On the Viability of Agrarianism—How Far Can It Go? Comments on Paul Thompson’s Agrarian Vision.Raymond Anthony - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):543-552.
    Abstract I consider Paul Thompson’s Agrarian Vision from the perspective of the philosophy of technology, especially as it relates to certain questions about public engagement and deliberative democracy around food issues. Is it able to promote an attitudinal shift or reorientation in values to overcome the view of “food as device” so that conscientious engagement in the food system by consumers can become more the norm? Next, I consider briefly, some questions to which it must face up (...)
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  50.  20
    Different Talks with Different Folks: A Comparative Survey of Stakeholder Dialog in Germany, Italy, and the U.S. [REVIEW]André Habisch, Lorenzo Patelli, Matteo Pedrini & Christoph Schwartz - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):381 - 551.
    Although theoretical underpinnings of stakeholder dialog (SD) have been extensively discussed in the extant literature, there is a lack of empirical studies presenting evidence on the SD initiatives undertaken by firms. In this article, we provide information about 294 SD initiatives collected through a content analysis of the sustainability reports published by large firms in Germany, Italy, and the U. S. In addition to a country-based description of the different forms, stakeholder categories, and topics of the SD initiatives, we explore (...)
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