Results for 'the impossibility of a solution to the mind-body problem'

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  1. Analogy and Mental Representation: A Solution to the Mind-Body Problem Based on the Philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars.William W. Davis - 1981 - Dissertation, University of Kansas
    In this dissertation, I provide the logical foundation for a solution to the mind-body problem, a solution which is directly based upon Wilfrid Sellars' analogical theory of thought and sensation. Chapters I-IV are devoted to an interpretation, analysis, and constructive criticism of Sellars' notions of the inner thought episode and the sensing state. My analysis is offered in support of three general contentions: I argue that the postulation of inner thought episodes and sensing states is necessary (...)
     
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  2.  5
    Shadows on the Soul: Plotinian Approaches to a Solution of the Mind-Body Problem.John Dillon - unknown - In Shadows on the Soul: Plotinian Approaches to a Solution of the Mind-Body Problem. pp. 73-84.
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  3. Zeno's Metrical Paradox of Extension and Descartes' Mind-Body Problem.Rafael Ferber - 2010 - In Stefania Giombini E. Flavia Marcacci (ed.), Estratto da/Excerpt from: Il quinto secolo. Studi di loso a antica in onore di Livio Rossetti a c. di Stefania Giombini e Flavia Marcacci. Aguaplano—Of cina del libro, Passignano s.T. 2010, pp. 295-310 [isbn/ean: 978-88-904213-4-1]. pp. 205-310.
    The article uses Zeno’s metrical paradox of extension, or Zeno’s fundamental paradox, as a thought-model for the mind-body problem. With the help of this model, the distinction contained between mental and physical phenomena can be formulated as sharply as possible. I formulate Zeno’s fundamental paradox and give a sketch of four different solutions to it. Then I construct a mind-body paradox corresponding to the fundamental paradox. Through that, it becomes possible to copy the solutions to the fundamental (...)
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  4.  11
    A Critical Examination of Identity Theory as a Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.G. E. Idang - 2006 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 8 (1).
  5.  8
    Wilfrid Sellars. Mind, Meaning, and Behavior. Philosophical Studies, Vol. 3 , Pp. 83–95. See Corrigenda, Ibid., After Table of Contents for Vols. 1–3. - Wilfrid Sellars. A Semantical Solution of the Mind-Body Problem. Methodos, Vol. 5 , Pp. 45–82. - Silvio Ceccato. Discussione. Methodos, Vol. 5 , Pp. 83–84. - Karl R. Popper. Language and the Body-Mind Problem. A Restatement of Interactionism. Actes du XIème Congrès International de Philosophie, Volume VII, Psychologie Philosophique, North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam 1953, and Éditions E. Nauwelaerts, Louvain 1953, Pp. 101–107. - Wilfrid Sellars. A Note on Popper's Argument for Dualism. Analysis , Vol. 15 No. 1 , Pp. 23–24. - Karl R. Popper. A Note on the Body-Mind Problem. Reply to Professor Wilfrid Sellars. Analysis , Vol. 15 No. 6 , Pp. 131–135. [REVIEW]A. H. Basson - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (1):88-89.
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  6. Collingwood's Solution to the Problem of Mind-Body Dualism.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2005 - Philosophia 32 (1-4):349-368.
    This paper contrasts two approaches to the mind-body problem and the possibility of mental causation: the conceptual approach advocated by Collingwood/Dray and the metaphysical approach advocated by Davidson. On the conceptual approach to show that mental causation is possible is equivalent to demonstrating that mentalistic explanations possess a different logical structure from naturalistic explanations. On the metaphysical approach to show that mental causation is possible entails explaining how the mind can intelligibly be accommodated within a physicalist universe. I (...)
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  7. Thoughts About a Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.Arnold Zuboff - 2008 - Think 6 (17-18):159-171.
    This challenging paper presents an ingenious argument for a functionalist theory of mind. Part of the argument: My visual cortex at the back of my brain processes the stimulation to my eyes and then causes other parts of the brain - like the speech centre and the areas involved in thought and movement - to be properly responsive to vision. According to functionalism the whole mental character of vision - the whole of how things look - is fixed purely in (...)
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  8.  11
    Kant’s Perspectival Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2016 - Culture and Dialogue 4 (1):194-213.
    Kant’s Critical philosophy solves Descartes’ mind-body problem, replacing the dualism of the “physical influx” theory he defended in his early career. Kant’s solution, like all Critical theories, is “perspectival,” acknowledging deep truth in both opposing extremes. Minds are not separate from bodies, but a manifestation of them, each viewed from a different perspective. Kant’s transcendental conditions of knowledge portray the mind not as creating the physical world, but as necessarily structuring our knowledge of objects with a set (...)
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  9. A Quasi-Materialist, Quasi-Dualist Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.John-Michael M. Kuczynski - 2004 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 45 (109):81-135.
  10.  18
    Emergent Materialism: A Proposed Solution to the Mind/Body Problem.Selton L. Peters - 1995 - University Press of America.
    This book is particularly appropriate for graduate seminars or upper division courses in philosophy of mind, and for metaphysics or introductory philosophy ...
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  11. Property Dualism and the Merits of Solutions to the Mind-Body Problem: A Reply to Strawson.Fiona Macpherson - 2006 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (10-11):72-89.
    This paper is divided into two main sections. The first articulates what I believe Strawson's position to be. I contrast Strawson's usage of 'physicalism' with the mainstream use. I then explain why I think that Strawson's position is one of property dualism and substance monism. In doing this, I outline his view and Locke's view on the nature of substance. I argue that they are similar in many respects and thus it is no surprise that Strawson actually holds a view (...)
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  12. Kant's Earliest Solution to the Mind/Body Problem.Andrew Norris Carpenter - 1998 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    In 1747, Kant believed that the mind/body problem presupposed several false and interrelated assumptions that fell under the general view that the essential force of body is vis motrix, namely that bodies act only by causing changes of motion, that bodies can be acted upon only by being moved, and that souls and bodies do not share a common force. He argued in Thoughts on the True Estimation of Living Forces that the traditional vis motrix view, which was defended (...)
     
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  13.  51
    Can Ockham's Razor Cut Through the Mind-Body Problem? A Critical Examination of Churchland's "Raze Dualism" Argument for Materialism.Christopher J. Anderson - 2001 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):46-60.
    Notes that the question of materialism's adequacy as a solution to the mind-body problem is important in psychology as fields supported by eliminative materialism aim to "cannibalize" psychology . A common argument for adopting a materialistic worldview, termed the "Raze Dualism argument" in reference to Ockham's razor, is based on the principle of parsimony. It states that materialism is to be considered the superior solution to the mind-body problem because it is simpler than the (...)
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  14. Some Eighteenth Century Contributions to the Mind–Body Problem (Wolff, Taurellus, Knutzen, Bülfiger and the Pre-Critical Kant).Janusz Sytnik-Czetwertyński - 2013 - Axiomathes 23 (3):567-577.
    This work speaks about very special solution of the mind–body problem. This solution based on the so-called Principle of Co-existence stands out as one of the most interesting attempts at solving the mind–body problem. It states that substances can only exert a mutual influence on one another if they have something in common. This does not have to be a common property but rather, a binding relationship. Thus, substances co-exist when they remain bound by a common (...)
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  15. The Body Problem and Other Foundational Issues in the Metaphysics of Mind.Barbara Gail Montero - 2000 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    My dissertation focuses on the foundations of the mind-body problem: how we should think about the physical world, what the role of science is in arriving at a solution to the problem, and whether it is possible to answer metaphysical questions about the mind while admitting epistemic defeat. ;Many philosophers argue that the mind is physical, but few spend much time explaining what counts as being physical. This, I argue, is a mistake: if the mind-body (...)
     
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  16. Anomalous Dualism: A New Approach to the Mind-Body Problem.David Bourget - 2019 - In William Seager (ed.), The Handbook of Panpsychism. Routledge.
    In this paper, I explore anomalous dualism about consciousness, a view that has not previously been explored in any detail. We can classify theories of consciousness along two dimensions: first, a theory might be physicalist or dualist; second, a theory might endorse any of the three following views regarding causal relations between phenomenal properties (properties that characterize states of our consciousness) and physical properties: nomism (the two kinds of property interact through deterministic laws), acausalism (they do not causally interact), and (...)
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  17.  14
    Spiritual Objectivity. A Systematic Expansion of the Body-Mind-Problem.Axel Hutter - 2006 - SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):4-20.
    The article develops the thesis that spiritual objectivity constitutes an independent class of phenomena besides the physical and the mental. The concept of spiritual objectivity presents a solution for the mediation between the bodily and the conscious by further developing the insight of critical monism that individual action can neither be subsumed under the phenomena of the bodily outer world nor under the phenomena of the mental inner world. Referring to Gottlob Frege's thesis that what distinguishes a thought from (...)
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  18. Agent Causation as a Solution to the Problem of Action.Michael Brent - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (5):656-673.
    My primary aim is to defend a nonreductive solution to the problem of action. I argue that when you are performing an overt bodily action, you are playing an irreducible causal role in bringing about, sustaining, and controlling the movements of your body, a causal role best understood as an instance of agent causation. Thus, the solution that I defend employs a notion of agent causation, though emphatically not in defence of an account of free will, as (...)
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  19.  6
    Spiritual Objectivity. A Systematic Expansion of the Body-Mind-Problem.Axel Hutter - 2006 - SATS 7 (2).
    The article develops the thesis that spiritual objectivity constitutes an independent class of phenomena besides the physical and the mental. The concept of spiritual objectivity presents a solution for the mediation between the bodily and the conscious by further developing the insight of critical monism that individual action can neither be subsumed under the phenomena of the bodily outer world nor under the phenomena of the mental inner world. Referring to Gottlob Frege's thesis that what distinguishes a thought from (...)
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  20.  7
    A Common Sense Approach to the Mind-Body Problem: A Critique of Richard Taylor.Russell A. Lascola - 1992 - Journal of Philosophical Research 17:279-286.
    In a popular book and a widely anthologized article, Richard Taylor argues for a materialistic account of human nature based on considerations of common sense. While I do not argue against materialism, per se, I offer an extended critique of Taylor’s position that common sense unambiguously supports his version of materialism. I also argue that his account of the nature of psychological processes is of dubious philosophical value.
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  21. An Ontological Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.Bernardo Kastrup - 2017 - Philosophies 2 (2):doi:10.3390/philosophies2020010.
    I argue for an idealist ontology consistent with empirical observations, which seeks to explain the facts of nature more parsimoniously than physicalism and bottom-up panpsychism. This ontology also attempts to offer more explanatory power than both physicalism and bottom-up panpsychism, in that it does not fall prey to either the ‘hard problem of consciousness’ or the ‘subject combination problem’, respectively. It can be summarized as follows: spatially unbound consciousness is posited to be nature’s sole ontological primitive. We, as (...)
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  22. Russell and Schlick: A Remarkable Agreement on a Monistic Solution of the Mind-Body Problem.Herbert Feigl - 1975 - Erkenntnis 9 (May):11-34.
  23.  61
    Epiphenomenalism as a Solution to the Ontological Mind-Body Problem.Dieter Birnbacher - 1988 - Ratio 1 (1):17-32.
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  24.  17
    A New Solution to the Mind-Body Problem?Anna Marmodoro - 2018 - The Philosophers' Magazine 80:48-51.
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  25. Epiphenomenalism as a Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.Dieter Birnbacher - 1988 - Ratio:17.
     
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  26.  98
    A Semantical Solution of the Mind-Body Problem.Wilfrid S. Sellars - 1953 - Methodos 5 (September):45-84.
  27.  13
    A Problem for the Aristotelian Solution to the Mind-Body Problem.Richard Gray - 2001 - Philosophical Inquiry 23 (1-2):25-30.
  28.  11
    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Gondry 2004) Pursues a Perennial Problem Within the Philosophy of Medicine: Whether Society Should Limit the Pursuit of Biological Modifications That Have No Clear Therapeutic Purpose. In the Context of Memory Modification, the Origin Ofthis Question has its Roots in Two Crucial Bodies of Literature. The First Concerns the Mind-Body Problem, Which Involves Attempting to Ascer-Tain Their Relationship. In Large Part, the Entire Practice of Medicine is Concerned with .. [REVIEW]Andy Miah - 2009 - In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 137.
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  29. The Relevance of a Correct Theory of Denotation to the Mind-Body Problem.J. Fennell - 1999 - Journal of Thought 34:63-84.
  30. On the Solvability of the Mind-Body Problem.Jan Scheffel - manuscript
    The mind-body problem is analyzed in a physicalist perspective. By combining the concepts of emergence and algorithmic information theory in a thought experiment employing a basic nonlinear process, it is shown that epistemically strongly emergent properties may develop in a physical system. Turning to the significantly more complex neural network of the brain it is subsequently argued that consciousness is epistemically emergent. Thus reductionist understanding of consciousness appears not possible; the mind-body problem does not have a (...)
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  31. Chaos Theory and the Evolution of Consciousness and Mind: A Thermodynamic/Holographic Resolution to the Mind-Body Problem.Larry R. Vandervert - 1995 - New Ideas in Psychology 13:107-27.
  32.  12
    Arguably, Therefore, Nonreductive Materialism Can Respond Effectively to the Most Serious Arguments Made Against It Over the Last Forty Years, and as a Result, It Remains a Viable Position About the Nature of the Mental. See Also Functionalism; Mind-Body Problem; Multiple.Derk Pereboom - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 95:67-98.
  33. The Unsolvability of the Mind-Body Problem Liberates the Will.Scheffel Jan - manuscript
    The mind-body problem is analyzed in a physicalist perspective. By combining the concepts of emergence and algorithmic information theory in a thought experiment employing a basic nonlinear process, it is argued that epistemically strongly emergent properties may develop in a physical system. A comparison with the significantly more complex neural network of the brain shows that also consciousness is epistemically emergent in a strong sense. Thus reductionist understanding of consciousness appears not possible; the mind-body problem does (...)
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  34. Panpsychism and Causation: A New Argument and a Solution to the Combination Problem.Hedda Hassel Mørch - 2014 - Dissertation, Oslo
    Panpsychism is the view that every concrete and unified thing has some form of phenomenal consciousness or experience. It is an age-old doctrine, which, to the surprise of many, has recently taken on new life. In philosophy of mind, it has been put forth as a simple and radical solution to the mind–body problem (Chalmers 1996, 2003;Strawson 2006; Nagel 1979, 2012). In metaphysics and philosophy of science, it has been put forth as a solution to the (...) of accounting for the intrinsic nature of the physical itself (Strawson 2006, Seager 2006). In this thesis, I show that panpsychism can also be defended on the basis of an argument from our (arguable) acquaintance with the nature of causation in agency. This argument has made frequent appearances throughout the history of philosophy, with philosophers such as Leibniz, Schopenhauer and James, and I construct and defend an updated version of it. Furthermore, I offer a solution to the combination problem: how can complex (human and animal-type) consciousness result from simple (fundamental particle-type) consciousness? This is generally regarded as the most serious problem facing contemporary panpsychism. I propose that mental combination can be construed as kind causal process culminating in a fusion, and show how this avoids the main difficulties with accounting for mental combination. (shrink)
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  35.  63
    Exemplarization: A Solution to the Problem of Consciousness?Martina Fürst - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 161 (1):141-151.
    In recent publications, Keith Lehrer developed the intriguing idea of a special mental process– exemplarization – and applied it in a sophisticated manner to different phenomena such as intentionality, representation of the self, the knowledge of ineffable content (of art works) and the problem of (phenomenal) consciousness. In this paper I am primarily concerned with the latter issue. The target of this paper is to analyze whether exemplarization, besides explaining epistemic phenomena such as immediate and ineffable knowledge of experiences, (...)
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  36. The Mind-Body Problem in the Origin of Logical Empiricism: Herbert Feigl and Psychophysical Parallelism.Michael Heidelberger - 2001 - In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Cogprints. Pittsburgh University Pres. pp. 233--262.
    In the 19th century, "Psychophysical Parallelism" was the most popular solution of the mind-body problem among physiologists, psychologists and philosophers. (This is not to be mixed up with Leibnizian and other cases of "Cartesian" parallelism.) The fate of this non-Cartesian view, as founded by Gustav Theodor Fechner, is reviewed. It is shown that Feigl's "identity theory" eventually goes back to Alois Riehl who promoted a hybrid version of psychophysical parallelism and Kantian mind-body theory which was taken (...)
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  37. Aristotelian Endurantism: A New Solution to the Problem of Temporary Intrinsics.J. E. Brower - 2010 - Mind 119 (476):883-905.
    It is standardly assumed that there are three — and only three — ways to solve problem of temporary intrinsics: (a) embrace presentism, (b) relativize property possession to times, or (c) accept the doctrine of temporal parts. The first two solutions are favoured by endurantists, whereas the third is the perdurantist solution of choice. In this paper, I argue that there is a further type of solution available to endurantists, one that not only avoids the usual costs, (...)
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  38.  41
    A “No Causal Rivalry” Solution to the Problem of Mental Causation.Anthony Dardis - 2002 - Acta Analytica 17 (1):69-77.
    Stephen Yablo has recently argued for a novel solution to the mental causation problem: the mental is related to the physical as determinables are related to determinates; determinables are not causal rivals with their determinates; so the mental and the physical are not causal rivals. Despite its attractions the suggestion seems hard to accept. In this paper I develop the idea that mental properties and physical properties are not causal rivals. Start with property dualism, supervenience, multiple realizability, and (...)
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  39.  58
    A New Kantian Solution to the Third Antinomy of Pure Reason and to the Free Will Problem.Iuliana Corina Vaida - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):403-431.
    The goal of this paper is to articulate a new solution to Kant’s third antinomy of pure reason, one that establishes the possibility ofincompatibilist freedom—the freedom presupposed by our traditional conceptions of moral responsibility, moral worth, and justice—without relying on the doctrine of transcendental idealism (TI). A discussion of Henry Allison’s “two-aspect” interpretation of Kant’s TI allows me both to criticize one of the best defenses of TI today and to advance my own TI-free solution to the third (...)
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  40. Solving the Mind-Body Problem - the Real Significance of the Knowledge Argument.Dennis Nicholson - manuscript
    The Knowledge Argument is misconstructed. Knowing that it is ‘just obvious’ that Mary will learn something new on leaving her black and white room, we nevertheless assume she can acquire a complete knowledge of the physical inside it – thereby predetermining the outcome of the thought experiment in favour of a refutation of physicalism. If we reformulate the argument to leave the question of what she can learn in the room open, it becomes clear, not only that physicalism can survive (...)
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  41. Princess Elisabeth and the Problem of Mind-Body Interaction.Deborah Tollefsen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):59-77.
    : This paper focuses on Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia's philosophical views as exhibited in her early correspondence with René Descartes. Elisabeth's criticisms of Descartes's interactionism as well as her solution to the problem of mind-body interaction are examined in detail. The aim here is to develop a richer picture of Elisabeth as a philosophical thinker and to dispel the myth that she is simply a Cartesian muse.
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  42.  74
    Knowing Facts and Believing Propositions: A Solution to the Problem of Doxastic Shift.A. Moffett Marc - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 115 (1):81-97.
    The Problem of Doxastic Shift may be stated as a dilemma: on the one hand, the distribution of nominal complements of the form 'the φ that p' strongly suggests that 'that'-clauses cannot be univocally assigned propositional denotations; on the other hand, facts about quantification strongly suggest that 'that'-clauses must be assigned univocal denotations. I argue that the Problem may be solved by defining the extension of a proposition to be a set of facts or, more generally, conditions. Given (...)
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  43.  77
    Review of Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra's Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals[REVIEW]Jessica Wilson - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):241--246.
    As Rodriguez-Pereyra understands the Problem of Universals, solving it requires specifying the truthmakers of attributions of sparse properties to particulars, so as to resolve the “Many over One”—the puzzle of how the same particular can be different ways. According to Rodriguez-Pereyra, these truthmakers need not involve irreducible properties ; resemblances between particulars will do. Here I’ll set out Rodriguez-Pereyra’s version of resemblance nominalism and note certain of its problems, some of which can be answered with revisions that he could, (...)
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  44. Heuristic Identity Theory (or Back to the Future): The Mind-Body Problem Against the Background of Research Strategies in Cognitive Neuroscience.William P. Bechtel & Robert N. McCauley - 1999 - In Martin Hahn & S. C. Stoness (eds.), Proceedings of the 21st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 67-72.
    Functionalists in philosophy of mind traditionally raise two major arguments against the type identity theory: (1) psychological states are _multiply realizable_ so that there are no one-to-one mappings of psychological states onto neural states and (2) the most that evidence could ever establish is the _correlation_ of psychological and neural states, not their identity. We defend a variant on the traditional type identity theory which we call _heuristic identity theory_ (HIT) against both of these objections. Drawing its inspiration from scientific (...)
     
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  45.  63
    On the Alleged Backward Referral of Experience and its Relevance to the Mind-Body Problem.Patricia Smith Churchland - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (June):165-81.
    A remarkable hypothesis has recently been advanced by Libet and promoted by Eccles which claims that there is standardly a backwards referral of conscious experiences in time, and that this constitutes empirical evidence for the failure of identity of brain states and mental states. Libet's neurophysiological data are critically examined and are found insufficient to support the hypothesis. Additionally, it is argued that even if there is a temporal displacement phenomenon to be explained, a neurophysiological explanation is most likely.
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  46.  24
    Aristotle's Formal Identity of Intellect and Object: A Solution to the Problem of Modal Epistemology.Robert C. Koons - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy Today 1 (1):84-107.
    In De Anima Book III, Aristotle subscribed to a theory of formal identity between the human mind and the extra-mental objects of our understanding. This has been one of the most controversial featu...
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  47.  58
    Is Boredom One or Many? A Functional Solution to the Problem of Heterogeneity.Andreas Elpidorou - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    Despite great progress in our theoretical and empirical investigations of boredom, a basic issue regarding boredom remains unresolved: it is still unclear whether the construct of boredom is a unitary one or not. By surveying the relevant literature on boredom and arousal, the paper makes a case for the unity of the construct of boredom. It argues, first, that extant empirical findings do not support the heterogeneity of boredom, and, second, that a theoretically motivated and empirically grounded model of boredom (...)
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  48.  8
    Body, Soul, Spirit: A Survey of the Mind-Body Problem[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):550-550.
    A dialectically rather than chronologically ordered survey: it moves first through the outright dualism of Descartes, to the primacy-of-soul position of Plato, and then to the extremes of Feuerbachian materialism and Berkeleyean immaterialism. Then, returning to pre-philosophical foundations in an attempt to recapture the lived phenomenon of body-soul unity that each of the above philosophers acknowledged, but lost in a welter of reductive abstractions, Van Peursen considers the non-dualistic and non-reductivist conceptions of primitive man, Homeric man, and Biblical man. Coming (...)
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  49. Partial Belief as a Solution to the Logical Problem of Holding Simultaneous, Contrary Beliefs in Self-Deception Research.Keith Gibbins - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):115-116.
    A major worry in self-deception research has been the implication that people can hold a belief that something is true and false at the same time: a logical as well as a psychological impossibility. However, if beliefs are held with imperfect confidence, voluntary self-deception in the sense of seeking evidence to reject an unpleasant belief becomes entirely plausible and demonstrably real.
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  50.  20
    It’s All in Your Head: A Solution to the Problem of Object Coincidence.Graham Renz - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (4):1387-1407.
    It is uncontroversial that artifacts like statues and tables are mind-dependent. What is controversial is whether and how this mind-dependence has implications for the ontology of artifacts. I argue the mind-dependence of artifacts entails that there are no artifacts or artifact joints in the extra-mental world. In support of this claim, I argue that artifacts and artifact joints lack any extra-mental grounding, and so ought not to have a spot in a realist ontology. I conclude that the most plausible story (...)
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