Results for 'the self'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Situating the Self: Gender, Community, and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics.Seyla Benhabib - 1992 - Routledge.
    Situating the Self is a decisive intervention into debates concerning modernity, postmodernity, ehtics, and the self. It will be of interest to all concerned with critical theory or contemporary ethics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   247 citations  
  2. The Self‐Evidencing Brain.Jakob Hohwy - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1).
    An exciting theory in neuroscience is that the brain is an organ for prediction error minimization (PEM). This theory is rapidly gaining influence and is set to dominate the science of mind and brain in the years to come. PEM has extreme explanatory ambition, and profound philosophical implications. Here, I assume the theory, briefly explain it, and then I argue that PEM implies that the brain is essentially self-evidencing. This means it is imperative to identify an evidentiary boundary between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   110 citations  
  3. The Self and Its Brain: An Argument for Interactionism.Karl R. Popper & John C. Eccles - 1977 - Springer.
    Physical and chemical processes may act upon the mind; and when we are writing a difficult letter, our mind acts upon our body and, through a chain of physical...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   512 citations  
  4. The Self and its Brain.Stan Klein - 2012 - Social Cognition 30 (4):474-518.
    In this paper I argue that much of the confusion and mystery surrounding the concept of "self" can be traced to a failure to appreciate the distinction between the self as a collection of diverse neural components that provide us with our beliefs, memories, desires, personality, emotions, etc (the epistemological self) and the self that is best conceived as subjective, unified awareness, a point of view in the first person (ontological self). While the former can, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  5.  90
    The Self‐Evidencing Brain.Jakob Hohwy - 2016 - Noûs 50 (2):259-285.
    An exciting theory in neuroscience is that the brain is an organ for prediction error minimization. This theory is rapidly gaining influence and is set to dominate the science of mind and brain in the years to come. PEM has extreme explanatory ambition, and profound philosophical implications. Here, I assume the theory, briefly explain it, and then I argue that PEM implies that the brain is essentially self-evidencing. This means it is imperative to identify an evidentiary boundary between the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  6.  77
    The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness, and the First-Person Stance.Jonardon Ganeri - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Jonardon Ganeri presents a ground-breaking study of selfhood, drawing on Indian theories of consciousness and mind.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  7.  30
    Situating the Self: Gender, Community, and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics.Seyla Benhabib - 1992 - Polity.
    Focusing on contemporary debates in moral and political theory, Situating the Self argues that a non-relative ethics, binding on us in virtue of out humanity, is still a philosophically viable project. This intersting new book should be read by all those concerned with the problems of critical theory, the analysis of modernity, and contemporary ethics, as well as students and professionals in philosophy, sociology and political science.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   141 citations  
  8. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity.Charles Taylor - 1989 - Harvard University Press.
    Discusses contemporary notions of the self, and examines their origins, development, and effects.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   779 citations  
  9. The Self-Effacing Functionality of Blame.Matthieu Queloz - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (4):1361-1379.
    This paper puts forward an account of blame combining two ideas that are usually set up against each other: that blame performs an important function, and that blame is justified by the moral reasons making people blameworthy rather than by its functionality. The paper argues that blame could not have developed in a purely instrumental form, and that its functionality itself demands that its functionality be effaced in favour of non-instrumental reasons for blame—its functionality is self-effacing. This notion is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10. Defeating the Self-Defeat Argument for Phenomenal Conservativism.John M. DePoe - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 152 (3):347-359.
    Michael Huemer has argued for the justification principle known as phenomenal conservativism by employing a transcendental argument that claims all attempts to reject phenomenal conservativism ultimately are doomed to self-defeat. My contribution presents two independent arguments against the self-defeat argument for phenomenal conservativism after briefly presenting Huemer’s account of phenomenal conservativism and the justification for the self-defeat argument. My first argument suggests some ways that philosophers may reject Huemer’s premise that all justified beliefs are formed on the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  11. The Self as a Center of Narrative Gravity.Daniel C. Dennett - 1992 - In Frank S. Kessel, P. M. Cole & D. L. Johnson (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 4--237.
    What is a self? I will try to answer this question by developing an analogy with something much simpler, something which is nowhere near as puzzling as a self, but has some properties in common with selves. What I have in mind is the center of gravity of an object. This is a well-behaved concept in Newtonian physics. But a center of gravity is not an atom or a subatomic particle or any other physical item in the world. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  12.  17
    The Self and its brain.K. Popper & J. Eccles - 1986 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 27:167-171.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   486 citations  
  13.  35
    On the Self-Regulation of Behavior.Charles S. Carver - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a thorough overview of a model of human functioning based on the idea that behavior is goal-directed and regulated by feedback control processes. It describes feedback processes and their application to behavior, considers goals and the idea that goals are organized hierarchically, examines affect as deriving from a different kind of feedback process, and analyzes how success expectancies influence whether people keep trying to attain goals or disengage. Later sections consider a series of emerging themes, including dynamic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   137 citations  
  14. ‘The Self’.Galen Strawson - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):405-428.
    Recommends an approach to the philosophical problem about the existence and nature of the self in which the author models the problem of the self rather than attempting to model the self. It is suggested that the sense of the self is the source in experience of the philosophical problem of the self. The first question to ask is the phenomenological question: What is the nature of the sense of the self? But this, in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  15.  45
    The Self and its Emotions.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- What selves are -- Exploring selves -- The emotional self -- Self-concept : self-esteem and self-confidence -- The self as moral character -- Self-respect -- Multicultural selves -- Self-pathologies -- Self-change and self-education.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  16.  92
    The Self in Action: Lessons From Delusions of Control.Chris Frith - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):752-770.
    Patients with delusions of control are abnormally aware of the sensory consequences of their actions and have difficulty with on-line corrections of movement. As a result they do not feel in control of their movements. At the same time they are strongly aware of the action being intentional. This leads them to believe that their actions are being controlled by an external agent. In contrast, the normal mark of the self in action is that we have very little experience (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  17. The Self-Undermining Arguments From Disagreement.Eric Sampson - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 14:23-46.
    Arguments from disagreement against moral realism begin by calling attention to widespread, fundamental moral disagreement among a certain group of people. Then, some skeptical or anti-realist-friendly conclusion is drawn. Chapter 2 proposes that arguments from disagreement share a structure that makes them vulnerable to a single, powerful objection: they self-undermine. For each formulation of the argument from disagreement, at least one of its premises casts doubt either on itself or on one of the other premises. On reflection, this shouldn’t (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  9
    The Self-Organizing Universe: Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution.Erich Jantsch - 1980 - Pergamon Press.
    The book, with its emphasis on the interaction of microstructures with the entire biosphere, ecosystems etc., and on how micro- and macrocosmos mutually create the conditions for their further evolution, provides a comprehensive framework for a deeper understanding of human creativity in a time of transition.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  19.  25
    The Self-Understanding of Persons Beyond Narrativity.Katja Crone - 2020 - Philosophical Explorations 23 (1):65-77.
    Some narrative approaches assume a tight relation between narrative and selfhood. They hold that the self-understanding of persons as individuals possessing a set of particular character traits is above all narratively structured for it is constituted by stories persons tell or can tell about their lives. Against this view, it is argued that self-understanding is also characterized by certain non-narrative and invariant mental features. In order to show this, a non-narrative awareness of self-identity over time will be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology.Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for 60 years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception of biological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  21. Philosophical Conceptions of the Self: Implications for Cognitive Science.Shaun Gallagher - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):14-21.
    Although philosophical approaches to the self are diverse, several of them are relevant to cognitive science. First, the notion of a 'minimal self', a self devoid of temporal extension, is clarified by distinguishing between a sense of agency and a sense of ownership for action. To the extent that these senses are subject to failure in pathologies like schizophrenia, a neuropsychological model of schizophrenia may help to clarify the nature of the minimal self and its neurological (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   402 citations  
  22.  92
    When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification.Jean Decety & Thierry Chaminade - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  23.  35
    The Self and Its Brain.K. T. Maslin - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):370.
  24.  50
    The Self as Agent.John Macmurray - 1957 - London: Faber.
    At the heart of Macmurray's work is his attempt to reverse the proposition of philosophy of the modern period that posits the self as thinker withdrawn from action and essentially isolated from the world about which it reflects. Macmurray labored to recast the role of philosophy in the service of a more fulfilling and basic personal communion with others, with the world, and ultimately with God. Indeed, it can be said that Macmurray's philosophy is really a philosophy of community—a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  25.  67
    Situating the Self: Understanding the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Roy Dings & Leon de Bruin - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):151-165.
    The article proposes a theoretical model to account for changes in self due to Deep Brain Stimulation. First, we argue that most existing models postulate a very narrow conception of self, and thus fail to capture the full range of potentially relevant DBS-induced changes. Second, building on previous work by Shaun Gallagher, we propose a modified ‘pattern-theory of self’, which provides a richer picture of the possible consequences of DBS treatment.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  26.  87
    The Self-Knowledge Gambit.Berislav Marušić - 2013 - Synthese 190 (12):1977-1999.
    If we hold that perceiving is sufficient for knowing, we can raise a powerful objection to dreaming skepticism: Skeptics assume the implausible KK-principle, because they hold that if we don’t know whether we are dreaming or perceiving p, we don’t know whether p. The rejection of the KK-principle thus suggests an anti-skeptical strategy: We can sacrifice some of our self-knowledge—our second-order knowledge—and thereby save our knowledge of the external world. I call this strategy the Self-Knowledge Gambit. I argue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Do the Self-Deceived Get What They Want?Eric Funkhouser - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):295-312.
    Two of the most basic questions regarding self-deception remain unsettled: What do self-deceivers want? What do self-deceivers get? I argue that self-deceivers are motivated by a desire to believe. However, in significant contrast with Alfred Mele’s account of self-deception, I argue that self-deceivers do not satisfy this desire. Instead, the end-state of self-deception is a false higher-order belief. This shows all self-deception to be a failure of self-knowledge.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  28.  20
    Dissolving the Self.George Deane - 2020 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 1 (I):1-27.
    Psychedelic drugs such as psilocybin, LSD and DMT are known to induce powerful alterations in phenomenology. Perhaps of most philosophical and scientific interest is their capacity to disrupt and even “dissolve” one of the most primary features of normal experience: that of being a self. Such “peak” or “mystical” experiences are of increasing interest for their potentially transformative therapeutic value. While empirical research is underway, a theoretical conception of the mechanisms underpinning these experiences remains elusive. In the following paper, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29. The Self and the Future.Bernard Williams - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (2):161-180.
  30. The Self and its Defences.M. Di Francesco, M. Marraffa & A. Paternoster - 2016 - London: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book we offer a theory of the self, whose core ideas are that the self is a process of self-representing, and this process aims mainly at defending the self-conscious subject against the threat of its metaphysical inconsistence. In other words, the self is essentially a repertoire of psychological manoeuvres whose outcome is a self-representation aimed at coping with the fundamental fragility of the human subject. Our picture of the self differs from (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31.  50
    The Self Shows Up in Experience.Matt Duncan - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):299-318.
    I can be aware of myself, and thereby come to know things about myself, in a variety of different ways. But is there some special way in which I—and only I—can learn about myself? Can I become aware of myself by introspecting? Do I somehow show up in my own conscious experiences? David Hume and most contemporary philosophers say no. They deny that the self shows up in experience. However, in this paper I appeal to research on schizophrenia—on thought (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  32. The Self-Vindication of the Laboratory Sciences.Ian Hacking - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 29--64.
  33.  25
    How the Self Controls its Brain.John C. Eccles - 1994 - Springer.
    In this book the author has collected a number of his important works and added an extensive commentary relating his ideas to those of other prominentnames in the consciousness debate. The view presented here is that of a convinced dualist who challenges in a lively and humorous way the prevailing materialist "doctrines" of many recent works. Also included is a new attempt to explain mind-brain interaction via a quantum process affecting the release of neurotransmitters. John Eccles received a knighthood in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  34. The Self Organization of Human Interaction.Rick Dale, Riccardo Fusaroli, Nicholas Duran & Daniel Richardson - 2013 - Psychology of Learning and Motivation 59.
    We describe a “centipede’s dilemma” that faces the sciences of human interaction. Research on human interaction has been involved in extensive theoretical debate, although the vast majority of research tends to focus on a small set of human behaviors, cognitive processes, and interactive contexts. The problem is that naturalistic human interaction must integrate all of these factors simultaneously, and grander theoretical mitigation cannot come only from focused experimental or computational agendas. We look to dynamical systems theory as a framework for (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  35. The Self and Social Behavior in Differing Cultural Contexts.Harry C. Triandis - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (3):506-520.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   95 citations  
  36.  43
    Situating the Self: Understanding the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Roy Dings & Leon Bruin - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):151-165.
    The article proposes a theoretical model to account for changes in self due to Deep Brain Stimulation. First, we argue that most existing models postulate a very narrow conception of self, and thus fail to capture the full range of potentially relevant DBS-induced changes. Second, building on previous work by Shaun Gallagher, we propose a modified ‘pattern-theory of self’, which provides a richer picture of the possible consequences of DBS treatment.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  37. The Self and the Phenomenal.Barry Dainton - 2004 - Ratio 17 (4):365-89.
    As is widely appreciated and easily demonstrated, the notion that we are essentially experiential (or conscious) beings has a good deal of appeal; what is less obvious, and more controversial, is whether it is possible to devise a viable account of the self along such lines within the confines of a broadly naturalistic metaphysical framework. There are many avenues to explore, but here I confine myself to outlining the case for one particular approach. I suggest that we should think (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  38. Can the Self Divide?John Perry - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (16):463.
  39. The Self and its Brain.K. R. Popper & J. Eccles - 1977 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 84 (2):259-260.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   121 citations  
  40. Taking the Self Out of Self-Rule.Michael Garnett - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):21-33.
    Many philosophers believe that agents are self-ruled only when ruled by their (authentic) selves. Though this view is rarely argued for explicitly, one tempting line of thought suggests that self-rule is just obviously equivalent to rule by the self . However, the plausibility of this thought evaporates upon close examination of the logic of ‘self-rule’ and similar reflexives. Moreover, attempts to rescue the account by recasting it in negative terms are unpromising. In light of these problems, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41. The Self-Organizing Consciousness.Pierre Perruchet & Annie Vinter - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):297-388.
    We propose that the isomorphism generally observed between the representations composing our momentary phenomenal experience and the structure of the world is the end-product of a progressive organization that emerges thanks to elementary associative processes that take our conscious representations themselves as the stuff on which they operate, a thesis that we summarize in the concept of Self-Organizing Consciousness (SOC). Key Words: Associative learning; automatism; consciousness; development; implicit learning; incubation; language; mental representation; perception; phenomenal experience.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  42. The Self in Contextualized Action.Shaun Gallagher & Anthony J. Marcel - 2002 - In Jonathan Shear & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Thorverton Uk: Imprint Academic. pp. 273.
    This paper suggests that certain traditional ways of analysing the self start off in situations that are abstract or detached from normal experience, and that the conclusions reached in such approaches are, as a result, inexact or mistaken. The paper raises the question of whether there are more contextualized forms of self- consciousness than those usually appealed to in philosophical or psychological analyses, and whether they can be the basis for a more adequate theoretical approach to the (...). First, we develop a distinction between abstract and contextualized actions and intentions by drawing on evidence from studies of rehabilitation after brain damage, and we introduce the notion of intentional attitude. Second, we discuss several interesting conclusions drawn from theoretically and experimentally abstract approaches. These conclusions raise some important issues about both the nature of the self and reflexive consciousness. At the same time they indicate the serious limita- tions concerning what we can claim about self and self-consciousness within such abstract frameworks. Such limitations motivate the question of whether it is possible to capture a sense of self that is more embedded in contextualized actions. Specifically, our concern is to focus on first-person approaches. We identify two forms of self-consciousness, eco- logical self-awareness and embedded reflection, that (1) function within the kinds of contextualized activity we have indicated, and (2) can be the basis for a theoretical account of the self. Both forms of self-consciousness are closely tied to action and promise to provide a less abstract basis for developing a theoretical approach to the self. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  43.  12
    The Self We Live By: Narrative Identity in a Postmodern World.James A. Holstein & Jaber F. Gubrium - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    The Self We Live By confronts the serious challenges facing the self in postmodern times. Taking issue with contemporary trivializations of the self, the book traces a course of development from the early pragmatists who formulated what they called the 'empirical self', to contemporary constructionist views of the storied self. Presenting an institutional context for the increasing complexity and ubiquity of narrative identity, the authors illustrate the 'everyday technology of self construction' and idscuss the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  44. The Self in Contextualized Action.S. Gallagher & A. Marcel - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (4):4-30.
    This paper suggests that certain traditional ways of analysing the self start off in situations that are abstract or detached from normal experience, and that the conclusions reached in such approaches are, as a result, inexact or mistaken. The paper raises the question of whether there are more contextualized forms of self-consciousness than those usually appealed to in philosophical or psychological analyses, and whether they can be the basis for a more adequate theoretical approach to the self. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  45.  80
    Exploring the Self: Philosophical and Psychopathological Perspectives on Self-Experience.Dan Zahavi (ed.) - 2000 - Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    The aim of this volume is to discuss recent research into self-experience and its disorders, and to contribute to a better integration of the different ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46. Schizophrenia, Consciousness, and the Self.Louis A. Sass & Josef Parnas - 2003 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 29 (3):427-444.
    In recent years, there has been much focus on the apparent heterogeneity of schizophrenic symptoms. By contrast, this article proposes a unifying account emphasizing basic abnormalities of consciousness that underlie and also antecede a disparate assortment of signs and symptoms. Schizophrenia, we argue, is fundamentally a self-disorder or ipseity disturbance that is characterized by complementary distortions of the act of awareness: hyperreflexivity and diminished self-affection. Hyperreflexivity refers to forms of exaggerated self-consciousness in which aspects of oneself are (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   145 citations  
  47. The Self as Narrator.J. David Velleman - 2005 - In Joel Anderson & John Christman (eds.), Autonomy and the Challenges to Liberalism: New Essays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  48.  65
    The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity.Thomas Pradeu - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    The Limits of the Self, will be essential reading for anyone interested in the definition of biological individuality and the understanding of the immune system.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  49. The Self-Locating Property Theory of Color.Berit Brogaard - 2015 - Minds and Machines 25 (2):133-147.
    The paper reviews the empirical evidence for highly significant variation across perceivers in hue perception and argues that color physicalism cannot accommodate this variability. Two views that can accommodate the individual differences in hue perception are considered: the self-locating property theory, according to which colors are self-locating properties, and color relationalism, according to which colors are relations to perceivers and viewing conditions. It is subsequently argued that on a plausible rendition of the two views, the self-locating theory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  50.  2
    The Self and its Emotions.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    If there is one value that seems beyond reproach in modernity, it is that of the self and the terms that cluster around it, such as self-esteem, self-confidence and self-respect. It is not clear, however, that all those who invoke the self really know what they are talking about, or that they are all talking about the same thing. What is this thing called 'self', then, and what is its psychological, philosophical and educational salience? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000