Results for 'to John Duns Scotus'

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  1.  10
    Citations of Works Attributed.to John Duns Scotus - 2003 - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. Cambridge University Press.
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  2.  34
    John Duns Scotus Versus Thomas Aquinas on Action-Passion Identity.Can Laurens Löwe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1027-1044.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Thomas Aquinas’ and John Duns Scotus’ respective views on the action-passion identity thesis. This thesis, which goes back to Aristotle, states that when an agent causes a change in a patient, then the agent’s causing of the change is identical to the patient’s undergoing of said change. Action and passion are, on this view, one and the same change in the patient, albeit under two distinct descriptions. The first part of the paper considers Aquinas’ (...)
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  3.  17
    John Duns Scotus in the History of Medieval Philosophy From the Sixteenth Century to Étienne Gilson.R. Trent Pomplun - 2017 - Https://Doi.Org/10.1484/J.Bpm.5.113344 58:355-445.
    This article traces the fortunes of John Duns Scotus in histories of philosophy from Melanchthon’s student Caspar Peucer to the eminent medievalist Étienne Gilson. It identifies themes and historiographical methods common to sources from the late sixteenth century and follows their development to the present, with special emphasis given to the socalled historia philosophiae philosophica first advanced by Lutheran historians during the early Enlightenment.
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  4.  29
    John Duns Scotus in the History of Medieval Philosophy From the Sixteenth Century to Étienne Gilson.R. Trent Pomplun - 2016 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 58:355-445.
    This article traces the fortunes of John Duns Scotus in histories of philosophy from Melanchthon’s student Caspar Peucer to the eminent medievalist Étienne Gilson. It identifies themes and historiographical methods common to sources from the late sixteenth century and follows their development to the present, with special emphasis given to the socalled historia philosophiae philosophica first advanced by Lutheran historians during the early Enlightenment.
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  5.  55
    John Duns Scotus on God's Knowledge of Sins: A Test-Case for God's Knowledge of Contingents.Gloria Frost - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 15-34.
    This paper discusses Scotus’s view of how God knows sins by analyzing texts from his discussions of God’s permission of sin and predestination. I show that Scotus departed from his standard theory of how God knows contingents when explaining how God knows sins. God cannot know sins by knowing a first-order act of his will, as he knows other contingents according to Scotus, since God does not directly will sins. I suggest that Scotus’s recognition that his (...)
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  6.  32
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.James F. Ross - 1965 - Journal of Philosophy 62 (3):80-83.
  7.  78
    John Duns Scotus: Metaphysics and Ethics.Ludger Honnefelder, Rega Wood & Mechtild Dreyer (eds.) - 1996 - E.J. Brill.
  8.  43
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.Timothy C. Potts - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):361.
  9. Duns Scotus: Philosophical Writings.John Duns Scotus - 1987 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    The philosophical writings of Duns Scotus, one of the most influential philosophers of the Later Middle Ages, are here presented in a volume that presents the original Latin with facing page English translation._ CONTENTS: _ Foreword to the Second Edition. Preface. Introduction. Select Bibliography. I. Concerning Metaphysics II. Man’s Natural Knowledge of God III. The Existence of God IV. The Unicity of God V. Concerning Human Knowledge VI. The Spirituality and Immortality of the Human Soul Notes. Index of (...)
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  10. Free Will According to John Duns Scotus and Neuroscience.Sally K. Severino - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):156-174.
    Abstract. This paper examines two views of free will. It looks first at the fourteenth-century religious insights of John Duns Scotus, one of history's seminal thinkers about free will. It then examines what current neuroscience tells us about free will. Finally, it summarizes the past and present views and concludes by answering two questions: Does free will refer to an absence of external constraint, or does it refer to a human ability to decide in an acausal manner?
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  11.  5
    The Singular Voice of Being: John Duns Scotus and Ultimate Difference by Andrew LaZella.Mary Beth Ingham Csj - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):147-148.
    While much has been published on the philosophical and theological positions of John Duns Scotus, the univocal concept of being continues to be a source of debate and, for some, condemnation. In this ambitious study, LaZella investigates how central the labor of division can be in order to “cut the univocal concept of being at its joints”. Throughout, LaZella engages with classic and contemporary scholarship to achieve a twofold end. First, he clearly shows how, for Scotus, (...)
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  12.  10
    John Duns Scotus: Selected Writings on Ethics by Thomas Williams.William Crozier - 2017 - Franciscan Studies 75:541-546.
    Even amongst those with only a cursory knowledge of the moral philosophy of John Duns Scotus, the association of Scotus's thought with voluntarism is well known. Next to his much-discussed, highly controversial theory of the univocity of being, Scotus's ethical thought, particularly his interpretation of the role of God's will in dictating moral norms, remains one of the most disputed – and arguably most misunderstood – areas of his philosophical synthesis. As Efrem Bettoni noted many (...)
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  13.  10
    John Duns Scotus, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Chaucer's Portrayal of the Canterbury Pilgrims.James I. Wimsatt - 1996 - Speculum 71 (3):633-645.
    While it is almost always difficult to identify firm relationships between imaginative works of literature and contemporary philosophy, it seems sure that at any particular time literature and philosophy do not float free of each other. There was a particularly solid basis for the connection in the fourteenth century, when philosophical studies were basic in advanced education and major philosopher-theologians like Walter Burley and John Wycliffe were prominent public figures. Yet significant scholarship that relates Chaucer's poetry to the philosophy (...)
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  14.  12
    Reflections on John Duns Scotus on the Will.John Boler - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 129--153.
  15. John Duns Scotus and the Ontology of Mixture.Lucian Petrescu - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):315-337.
    This paper presents Duns Scotus’s theory of mixture in the context of medieval discussions over Aristotle’s theory of mixed bodies. It revisits the accounts of mixture given by Avicenna, Averroes, and Thomas Aquinas, before presenting Scotus’s account as a reaction to Averroes. It argues that Duns Scotus rejected the Aristotelian theory of mixture altogether and that his account went contrary to the entire Latin tradition. Scotus denies that mixts arise out of the four classical (...)
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  16. Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism a Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.John F. Boler - 1963 - University of Washington Press.
  17. Animals, Animal Parts, and Hylomorphism: John Duns Scotus's Pluralism About Substantial Form.Thomas M. Ward - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (4):531-557.
    This paper presents an original interpretation of John Duns Scotus’s theory of hylomorphism. I argue that Scotus thinks, contrary to Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, that at least some of the extended parts of a substance—paradigmatically the organs of an animal—are themselves substances. Moreover, Scotus thinks that the form of corporeity is nothing more than the substantial forms of these organic parts. I offer an account of how Scotus thinks that the various extended parts of (...)
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  18.  57
    John Duns Scotus and the Principle ‘Omne Quod Movetur Ab Alio Movetur’. [REVIEW]Edwin Rabbitte - 1964 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 13:257-258.
    Among the proofs he gives for the existence of God Scotus makes no mention of the proof from motion. In this he differs from St Thomas, for whom the proof from motion is, apparently, the proof for the existence of God. Why does Scotus omit the proof from motion? Is it, as has been held, because he regarded this proof as simply a special form of the proof from efficient causality? Or is it because he held the proof (...)
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  19.  62
    Duns Scotus.Richard Cross - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    The nature and content of the thought of Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) remains largely unknown except by the expert. This book provides an accessible account of Scotus' theology, focusing both on what is distinctive in his thought, and on issues where his insights might prove to be of perennial value.
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  20.  21
    Evidence and its Function According to John Duns Scotus.J. D. Bastable - 1954 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 4:84-86.
  21.  4
    Evidence and its Function According to John Duns Scotus[REVIEW]J. D. Bastable - 1954 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 4:84-86.
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  22. Evidence and its Function According to John Duns Scotus.J. D. Bastable - 1954 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 4:84-86.
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  23.  6
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus. John R. Boler.Vernon J. Bourke - 1964 - Speculum 39 (3):493-494.
  24.  10
    Evidence and its Function According to John Duns Scotus.Ignatius Brady - 1953 - New Scholasticism 27 (2):239-240.
  25. The Principle of Individuation According to John Duns Scotus.Michal Chabada - 2008 - Filosoficky Casopis 56 (4):551-563.
     
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  26.  7
    The Necessary Connection of Moral Virtue to Prudence According to John Duns Scotus - Revisited.S. D. Dumont - 1988 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 55:184-206.
  27.  24
    C.S.J. The Harmony of Goodness. Mutuality and Moral Living According to John Duns Scotus by M. B. Ingham (Review).Girard J. Etzkorn - 1998 - Franciscan Studies 55 (1):356-359.
  28. The Harmony of Goodness: Mutuality and Moral Living According to John Duns Scotus.Mary Beth Ingham - 2012 - Franciscan Institute Publications.
  29.  25
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce’s Relation to John Duns Scotus[REVIEW]Vincent G. Potter - 1964 - International Philosophical Quarterly 4 (2):317-320.
  30.  14
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.Richard Rorty - 1966 - Philosophical Review 75 (1):116.
  31. Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus on Individual Acts and the Ultimate End.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2011 - In Kent Emery Russell Friedman (ed.), Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages. pp. 351-374.
    The distinction between Thomas and Scotus on threefold referral is superficially similar in that both use the same terminology of actual, virtual, and habitual referral. For Scotus, an act is virtually referred to the ultimate end through an agent’s somehow explicitly thinking about the end and some sort of causal connection between the virtually intended act and the actually intended act. For Thomas, someone with charity virtually refers his acts to God as the ultimate end not because the (...)
     
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  32.  75
    The Resurrection of the Body According to Three Medieval Aristotelians: Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, William Ockham.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1992 - Philosophical Topics 20 (2):1-33.
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  33.  3
    The Theology of John Duns Scotus, Studies in Reformed Theology Series by Antonie Vos.William Crozier - 2019 - Franciscan Studies 77 (1):281-283.
    As even a cursory glance at the available secondary literature on John Duns Scotus reveals, when compared to the thought of other scholastics such as Aquinas and Bonaventure, there exists a notable dearth of introductory and advanced literature on the thought of the Subtle Doctor. Apart from the early studies of C. R. S. Harris and Efrem Bettoni published during the 1920's and 50's, up until the last few decades the English-speaking student has had little material to (...)
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  34. Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus on Our Natural Knowledge of God.Alexander W. Hall - 2004 - Dissertation, Emory University
    In 1277, Stephen Tempier, bishop of Paris, drafted the famous Condemnation of 219 articles in theology and natural philosophy. This Condemnation was a reaction against a group of theologians, led by Siger of Brabant, who were accused of holding that truths of reason could contradict those of revelation. Writing before the Condemnation, which impugned reason's autonomy, Thomas Aquinas critiqued Siger and his followers, and argued that reason could never generate truths that contradict revelation. As a consequence, Aquinas sometimes dwells on (...)
     
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  35.  10
    A New Redaction of John Duns Scotus’ Reportatio Parisiensis IV.Antonio Punzi - 2016 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 58:101-189.
    This article announces the discovery of a third version of John Duns Scotus’ Reportatio Parisiensis IV, contained in a recently identified manuscript and a fragment. A provisional synoptic edition of all the versions of Reportatio Parisiensis IV dd.26-28 aims to show how the Parisian reports of Scotus’ lectures where gradually redacted. Through an analysis of the three versions of Reportatio IV, we are now able to identify the editorial stages of the text, from the version closest (...)
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  36.  10
    A New Redaction of John Duns Scotus’ Reportatio Parisiensis IV.Antonio Punzi - 2017 - Https://Doi.Org/10.1484/J.Bpm.5.113340 58:101-189.
    This article announces the discovery of a third version of John Duns Scotus’ Reportatio Parisiensis IV, contained in a recently identified manuscript and a fragment. A provisional synoptic edition of all the versions of Reportatio Parisiensis IV dd.26-28 aims to show how the Parisian reports of Scotus’ lectures where gradually redacted. Through an analysis of the three versions of Reportatio IV, we are now able to identify the editorial stages of the text, from the version closest (...)
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  37.  88
    Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus: Natural Theology in the High Middle Ages (Review).Thomas Williams - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 483-485.
    In this ambitious study, Alexander W. Hall examines the two preeminent figures of the golden age of natural theology: Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus. Hall is not so much concerned with retracing particular proofs of the existence of God and derivations of the divine attributes—well-worn paths in discussions of medieval natural theology—as with investigating the larger philosophical issues that are raised by the project of natural theology, such as the nature of scientia and demonstrative arguments, and (...)
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  38. Molina and John Duns Scotus.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2014 - In Mathias Kaufmann & Alexander Aichele (eds.), A Companion to Luis de Molina. Brill. pp. 325-364.
  39.  21
    The Philosophical Vision of John Duns Scotus: An Introduction.Christopher Cullen - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):431-432.
    The book is divided into eight chapters, covering various branches of philosophy, beginning with epistemology and proceeding through metaphysics to psychology and ethics. The book’s first chapter prepares the reader for this philosophical overview by sketching the historical and intellectual context in which Duns Scotus lived and worked. In this chapter the authors walk their reader through the maze of the Scotistic corpus acting as skilled guides. Scotus, they explain, has three different commentaries on the Sentences of (...)
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  40.  43
    The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.Thomas Williams (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Each volume in this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. John Duns Scotus was one of the three principal figures in medieval philosophy and theology, with an (...)
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  41.  9
    The Philosophy of John Duns Scotus (Review).Oleg Bychkov - 2009 - Franciscan Studies 67:526-531.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:It is difficult to do justice to a monumental study such as PJDS in a short review: only time will determine its real significance. We can only offer some preliminary comments, and in spite of anything we have to say, the mere fact that the book contains such a wealth of information justifies for it a permanent place on a bookshelf of a student of medieval thought.The title of (...)
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  42.  15
    Eric Doyle OFM: Blessed John Duns Scotus, Teilhard de Chardin and a Cosmos in Evolution.Brenda Abbott - 2017 - Franciscan Studies 75:497-525.
    Born in Bolton on 13 July 1938, the son of a mill-worker, Martin William Doyle was educated at St Joseph's R.C. primary school and then, having obtained an academic scholarship, at Thornleigh Salesian College. He entered the Order of Friars Minor at the age of 16, made his solemn profession the day after his twenty-first birthday and was ordained to the priesthood on 16 July 1961, which required a dispensation in view of his young age. This was followed by studies (...)
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  43.  7
    Reflections on John Duns Scotus on the Will1.H. Lagerlund & M. Yrjonsuuri - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1--129.
  44.  31
    A Treatise on God as First Principle.John Duns Scotus - 1966 - [Chicago?]Forum Books.
    It was this kind of priority Aristotle had in mind in his proof that act is prior to potency in the ninth book of the Metaphysics where he calls act prior ...
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  45.  34
    Dominic of Flanders’ Critique of John Duns Scotus’ Primary Argument for the Univocity of Being.Domenic D’Ettore - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):176-199.
    This article considers the attempt by a prominent fifteenth-century follower of Thomas Aquinas, Dominic of Flanders, to address John Duns Scotus’ most famous argument for the univocity of being. According to Scotus, the intellect must have a concept of being that is univocal to substantial and accidental being, and to finite and infinite being, on the grounds that an intellect cannot be both certain and doubtful through the same concept, but an intellect can be certain that (...)
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  46. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. (...)
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  47.  18
    Disrupted Cognition as an Alternative Solution to Heidegger’s Ontotheological Challenge: F. H. Bradley and John Duns Scotus.Cal Ledsham - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (4):310-328.
    Heidegger accuses ontotheologies of reducing God to a mere object of intelligibility, and thereby falsifying them, and in doing so distracting attention from or forgetting the ground of Being as unconcealment in the Lichtung. Conventional theistic responses to Heidegger’s ontotheological challenges proceed by offering analogy, speech-act theorising or negative theology as solutions. Yet these conventional solutions, however suitable as responses to Heidegger’s Die ontotheologische Verfassung der Metaphysik version of the ontotheological problem, still fall foul of Heidegger’s more profound characterisation of (...)
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  48.  2
    Contingency, Necessity and Freedom in the Reportatio I-A of John Duns Scotus.Michaël Bauwens - unknown
    John Duns Scotus distinguished the ‘convertible’ transcendentals, from ‘disjunctive’ transcendental pairs The latter are mutually exclusive pairs that together cover all of being. This paper investigates the distinctive modal metaphysical account based on the necessary-contingent pair of disjunctive transcendentals, developed by Scotus in approaching the problem of divine foreknowledge and future contingents. Although Scotus commented several times on this problem, only in his Reportatio did he explicitly add a succinct exposition distinguishing between two kinds of (...)
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  49.  4
    De Hermeneutische Betekenis van de Supralapsarische Christologie van Johannes Duns ScotusThe Supra-Lapsarian Christiology of John Duns Scotus and its Hermeneutic Implications.Henri Veldhuis - 2000 - Bijdragen 61 (2):152-174.
    John Duns Scotus holds the view that the Son would have become incarnate even if Adam had not sinned, moreover, even if no other men had been created. This supralapsarian view is not an example of meaningless scholastic speculation; on the contrary, it is essential for understanding the full hermeneutic meaning of Christ’s incarnation in our factual world. It implies that the essence of God’s love should not be understood primarily in connection to sin, but rather, that (...)
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  50. The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.Peter King - unknown
    [1] In twelve quite demanding chapters, outstanding scholars provide an overall view of the key issues of Scotus’s philosophical thought. To this a very concise introduction is added, concerning the life and works of John Duns (very good, especially the survey of works and the information on critical editions etc.). Throughout the book, I find the information clear and the difficult topics well explained. Moreover, the volume gives a quick entrance to the vast literature. Among the topics (...)
     
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