Results for 'uncles'

15 found
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  1.  22
    Kin Relationships and the Caregiving Biases of Grandparents, Aunts, and Uncles.Alexander Pashos & Donald H. McBurney - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):311-330.
    Paternity certainty and matrilineal family ties have been used to explain the asymmetric caregiving of grandparents and aunts and uncles. The proximate mechanisms underlying biased kin investment, however, remain unclear. A central question of the study presented here was whether the parent-kin relationship is an important link in the caregiving. In a two-generational questionnaire study, we asked subjects to estimate the intensity of their relationships to parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles (emotional closeness, investment received in childhood). In addition, (...)
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  2.  57
    Ant and Uncles.Eli Hirsch - 2017 - Philosophy Phridays.
    It is difficult to understand questions about the evolution of ants. It seems often to be assumed that there are specific features that ants possess because of the "survival value" of such features. This makes very little sense, because it is very hard to believe that there are any features at all that can be viewed as having survival value for ants.
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  3.  16
    Matrilateral Biases in the Investment of Aunts and Uncles.Donald H. McBurney, Jessica Simon, Steven J. C. Gaulin & Allan Geliebter - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (3):391-402.
    Gaulin, McBurney, and Brakeman-Wartell (1997) found that college students reported both matrilateral and sex biases in the investment of aunts and uncles (aunts invested more than uncles). They interpreted the matrilateral bias as a consequence of paternity uncertainty. We replicated that study with Orthodox Jewish college students, selected because they come from a population we presume to have higher paternity certainty than the general population. The Orthodox sample also showed matrilateral and sex biases. Comparing the two data sets, (...)
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  4.  8
    Matrilateral Biases in the Investment of Aunts and Uncles.Steven J. C. Gaulin, Donald H. McBurney & Stephanie L. Brakeman-Wartell - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (2):139-151.
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  5.  7
    Childlessness and Investment in Nieces, Nephews, Aunts and Uncles in Finland.Antti O. Tanskanen - 2015 - Journal of Biosocial Science 47 (3):402-406.
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  6. Raging Robots and Unruly Uncles[REVIEW]Gareth Matthews - 1982 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 4 (2):3-3.
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  7. The Other Maternal Uncles in Indian Languages.Panchanan Mohanty - 2008 - In Panchanan Mohanty, Ramesh C. Malik & Eswarappa Kasi (eds.), Ethnographic Discourse of the Other: Conceptual and Methodological Issues. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 69.
  8. Materteral and Avuncular Tendencies in Samoa.Paul L. Vasey & Doug P. VanderLaan - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (3):269-281.
    Androphilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult males, whereas gynephilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult females. In Independent Samoa, androphilic males, most of whom are effeminate or transgendered, are referred to as fa’afafine, which means “in the manner of a woman.” Previous research has established that fa’afafine report significantly higher avuncular tendencies relative to gynephilic men. We hypothesized that Samoan fa’afafine might adopt feminine gender role orientations with respect to childcare activity. If so, then the (...)
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  9.  76
    From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism.Michael B. Gill - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge Platonists only briefly and in passing. The surface of Hutcheson, (...)
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  10.  41
    Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz.Feliz Lucia Molina - 2013 - Continent 3 (1):17-24.
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  11.  14
    The La Grange Tomb and Choir: A Monument of the Great Schism of the West.Anne Morganstern - 1973 - Speculum 48 (1):52-69.
    At the death of Charles V in 1380, the French Monarchy entered an unstable period characterized by a struggle for control between the uncles of the young Charles VI, and the smaller rivalries encouraged by the resulting political instability. Among the late king's ministers whose fortunes changed with the new regime was the cardinal Jean de La Grange, councilor to Charles V and representative of the Avignon Schism Papacy at the court of its most implicated ally. jQuery.click { event.preventDefault(); (...)
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  12.  15
    King, Magnates, and Society: The Personal Rule of King Henry III, 1234–1258.D. A. Carpenter - 1985 - Speculum 60 (1):39-70.
    Between 1234 and 1258 King Henry III, having emerged from the tutelage of ministers inherited from his father, controlled the government of England himself. Looking at this period of personal rule, it would be easy to gain the impression that Henry's kingship, in its theory, and also to some extent its practice, challenged the position of the magnates. M. T. Clanchy, for example, in a justly famous article has suggested that in the 1240s and 1250s Henry III evolved a theory (...)
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  13.  16
    The Role of Parents, Siblings, Peers, Relatives and Other Agents in Turkish–Muslim Emerging Adults' Religious Socializations.Gözde Özdikmenli-Demir & Birsen Şahin-Kütük - 2012 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (3):363-396.
    In this exploratory qualitative study, the open-ended responses of 71 Turkish–Muslim university students regarding their religious socialization experiences were coded by NVivo 8. Results indicate that both parents play a major role in their offspring’s religious socialization. However, participants perceive their same-sex parents in particular as being more influential. Parents’ methods for transmitting religious values and practices include having religious talks with their children, answering their questions about Islam, sending them to mosques, reinforcing and/or punishing their behaviours. Peers, siblings, and (...)
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  14.  9
    The Role of Parents, Siblings, Peers, Relatives and Other Agents in Turkish–Muslim Emerging Adults’ Religious Socializations.Gözde Özdikmenli-Demir & Birsen Şahin-Kütük - 2012 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (3):363-396.
    In this exploratory qualitative study, the open-ended responses of 71 Turkish–Muslim university students regarding their religious socialization experiences were coded by NVivo 8. Results indicate that both parents play a major role in their offspring’s religious socialization. However, participants perceive their same-sex parents in particular as being more influential. Parents’ methods for transmitting religious values and practices include having religious talks with their children, answering their questions about Islam, sending them to mosques, reinforcing and/or punishing their behaviours. Peers, siblings, and (...)
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  15.  12
    Süssen Is Now Free of Jews: World War II, the Holocaust, and Rural Judaism.Gilya Gerda Schmidt - 2012 - Fordham University Press.
    Süssen is Now Free of Jews offers a close look at the legacy of two Jewish families in the village of Süssen, Württemberg, from 1902 to 1941. Coincidentally, two very different Jewish men, cattle dealer Jakob Lang and industrialist Alfred Ottenheimer established themselves in the village of Süssen in 1902. This micro-history of rural Jewish life chronicles the property of the Langs and the Ottenheimers, their personal inventory, building permits and business ventures. Hugo Lang describes their family’s daily routine, changes (...)
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