Results for 'vocalisation'

8 found
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  1. Is the Neural Basis of Vocalisation Different in Non-Human Primates and Homo Sapiens?Detlev Ploog - 2002 - In The Speciation of Modern Homo Sapiens. pp. 121-135.
     
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    Vocalisation and the Development of Hand Preference.Chris Code - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):215-216.
    What do the relationships observed in the occurrence of various limb, facial, and speech apraxias following left hemisphere damage mean for Corballis's theory? What does the right hemisphere's role in nonpropositional and automatic speech production tell us about the coevolution of right hand preference and speech; how could the possibility that the right hemisphere may be “dominant” for some aspects of speech be accommodated by his theory?
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    Sound Groups and Vocalisation of Sound Groups in Turkish Language.Süleyman Kaan Yalçin - 2011 - Journal of Turkish Studies 6:1597-1622.
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    Exorcising Grice’s Ghost: An Empirical Approach to Studying Intentional Communication in Animals.Simon Townsend, Sonja Koski, Richard Byrne, Katie Slocombe, Balthasar Bickel, Markus Boeckle, Ines Braga Goncalves, Judith Burkart, Tom Flower, Florence Gaunet, Hans Johann Glock, Thibaud Gruber, David Jansen, Katja Liebal, Angelika Linke, Adam Miklosi, Richard Moore, Carel van Schaik, Sabine Stoll, Alex Vail, Bridget Waller, Markus Wild, Klaus Zuberühler & Marta Manser - 2016 - Biological Reviews 3.
    Language’s intentional nature has been highlighted as a crucial feature distinguishing it from other communication systems. Specifically, language is often thought to depend on highly structured intentional action and mutual mindreading by a communicator and recipient. Whilst similar abilities in animals can shed light on the evolution of intentionality, they remain challenging to detect unambiguously. We revisit animal intentional communication and suggest that progress in identifying analogous capacities has been complicated by (i) the assumption that intentional (that is, voluntary) production (...)
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    Cyberchild: A Simulation Test-Bed for Consciousness Studies.Rodney M. J. Cotterill - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):31-45.
    The first brief description is given of a project aimed at searching for the neural correlates of consciousness through computer simulation. The underlying model is based on the known circuitry of the mammalian nervous system, the neuronal groups of which are approximated as binary composite units. The simulated nervous system includes just two senses - hearing and touch - and it drives a set of muscles that serve vocalisation, feeding and bladder control. These functions were chosen because of their (...)
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    Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech.Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
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    Cyclicity in Speech Derived From Call Repetition Rather Than From Intrinsic Cyclicity of Ingestion.R. J. Andrew - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):513-514.
    The jaw movements of speech are most probably derived from jaw movements associated with vocalisation. Cyclicity does not argue strongly for derivation from a cyclic pattern, because it arises readily in any system with feedback control. The appearance of regular repetition as a part of ritualisation of a display may have been important.
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    The Secret of Lateralisation is Trust.Chris Knight - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):231-232.
    Human right-handedness does not originate in vocalisation as such but in selection pressures for structuring complex sequences of digital signals internally, as if in a vacuum. Cautious receivers cannot automatically accept signals in this way. Biological displays are subjected to contextual scrutiny on a signal-by-signal basis – a task requiring coordination of both hemispheres. In order to explain left cerebral dominance in human manual and vocal signalling, we must therefore ask why it became adaptive for receivers to abandon caution, (...)
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