Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Catharine Macaulay" by Karen Green

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

Primary texts

  • “Account of the Life and Writings of Mrs. Catharine Macaulay Graham,” 1783, The European Magazine, 4: 330–4. (Scholar)
  • Burke, Edmund, 1770, Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents, 4th edition, London: J. Dodsley. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, Reflections on the Revolution in France, London: Penguin. (Scholar)
  • Burnet, Thomas, 1989, Remarks on John Locke by Thomas Burnet with Locke’s Replies, G. Watson and S. Doncaster (eds.), Yorkshire: Brynmill. (Scholar)
  • Carter, Elizabeth, 1808, A Series of Letters between Mrs. Elizabeth Carter and Miss Catherine Talbot from the year 1741 to 1770. To Which are Added Letters from Mrs. Carter to Mrs. [Elizabeth] Vesey between the years 1767 and 1787, Volume 2, London: F.C & J. Rivington. (Scholar)
  • Carter, Elizabeth, 1817, Letters from Mrs. Elizabeth Carter, to Mrs. Montagu, between the Years 1755 and 1800. Chiefly upon Literary and Moral Subjects, Montagu Pennington (ed.), London: F. C. & J. Rivington. (Scholar)
  • Cockburn, Catharine Trotter, 1702, A Defence of the Essay of Human Understanding Written by Mr Locke. Wherein its Principles with reference to Morality, Reveal’d Religion, and the Immortality of the Sould, are Consider’d and Justify’d: In Answer to Some Remarks on that Essay, London: Printer for Will Turner at Lincolns-Inn Back-Gate, and John Nutt near Stationers-Hall. (Scholar)
  • Harrington, James, 1656, The Commonwealth of Oceana, London: D. Pakeman. (Scholar)
  • Harris, James, 1751, Hermes: or, a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Language and Universal Grammar, London: H. Woodfall for J. Nourse and P. Vaillant. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1775, Philosophical Arrangements, London: J. Nourse. (Scholar)
  • Hays, Mary, 1803, Female biography; or Memoirs of Illustrious and celebrated women, of all ages and countries. Alphabetically arranged, 6 volumes, London: Richard Phillips. (Scholar)
  • Hume, David, 1754, The History of Great Britain (Volume 1), Edinburgh: Hamilton, Balfour and Neill. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1964, The Philosophical Works, T. H. Green and T. H. Grose (eds.), 4 volumes, Aalen: Scientia Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Locke, John, 1689, Two Treatises of Government, 2nd edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1967. (Scholar)
  • Macaulay, Catharine, 1763–83, The history of England from the accession of James 1. to that of the Brunswick line, 8 volumes, London: Printed for the author and sold by J. Nourse, J. Dodsley and W. Johnston. (Volumes 5–8 are titled The history of England from the accession of James 1. to the Revolution, London: C Dilly.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1767, Loose Remarks on certain positions to be found in Mr Hobbes’s “Philosophical rudiments of government and society,” with a short sketch of a democratical form of government, In a letter to Signor Paoli, London: T. Davies, in Russell-street, Covent Garden; Robinson and Roberts, in Pater-noster Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1769, Loose Remarks on certain positions to be found in Mr Hobbes’ Philosophical Rudiments of Government and society with a short sketch of a democratical form of government in a letter to Signor Paoli by Catharine Macaulay. The Second edition with two letters one from an American Gentleman to the author which contains some comments on her sketch of the democratical form of government and the author’s answer, London: W. Johnson, T. Davies, E. and C. Dilly, J. Almon, Robinson and Roberts, T. Cadell. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1770, Observations on a Pamphlet entitled “Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents”, 4th edition, London: Printed for Edward and Charles Dilly. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1774, A Modest Plea for the Property of Copy Right, Bath: R. Cruttwell. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1775, Address to the People of England, Scotland, and Ireland on the Present Important Crisis of Affairs, London: Dilly. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1778, History of England from the Revolution to the Present Time in a Series of Letters to a Friend, Bath: R. Cruttwell. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1783, A Treatise on the Immutability of Moral Truth, London: A. Hamilton. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1790, Letters on Education. With observations on religious and metaphysical subjects, London: C. Dilly. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1790, Observations on the Reflections of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke, on the Revolution in France, in a Letter for the Right Hon. The Earl of Stanhope, London: C. Dilly. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, The Correspondence of Catharine Macaulay, K. Green (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Tooke, John Horne, 1786, Epea pteroenta. Or, the diversions of Purley (Part I), London: J. Johnson. (Scholar)
  • Tucker, Abraham, 1768, The light of nature pursued. By Edward Search, Esq., 5 volumes, London: T. Jones. (Scholar)
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1989, The Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, J. Todd and M. Butler (eds.), 7 volumes, London: Pickering. (Scholar)

Secondary texts

  • Bergès, Sandrine, 2013, The Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Bolton, Martha Brandt, 1996, “Some aspects of the philosophical work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn,” in Hypatia’s Daughters: Fifteen hundred years of women philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp.139–164. (Scholar)
  • Boos, Florence, 1976, “Catharine Macaulay’s Letters on Education (1790): An early feminist polemic,” University of Michigan Papers in Women’s Studies, 2 (2): 64–78. (Scholar)
  • Boos, Florence, and William Boos, 1980, “Catharine Macaulay: Historian and political reformer,” International Journal of Women’s Studies, 3 (6): 49–65. (Scholar)
  • Coffee, Alan, 2019 “Catharine Macaulay,” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind, Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting, and Alan Coffee (eds.) London: Routledge, pp.198–210. (Scholar)
  • Davies, Kate, 2005, Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Donnelly, Lucy Martin, 1949, “The Celebrated Mrs Macaulay,” William and Mary Quarterly, 6 (2): 172–207. (Scholar)
  • Eger, Elizabeth, and Lucy Peltz, 2008, Brilliant Women: 18th-Century Bluestockings, London: National Portrait Gallery. (Scholar)
  • Gardner, Catherine, 1998, “Catharine Macaulay’s Letters on Education: Odd but Equal,” Hypatia, 13 (1): 118–137. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000, “Catherine Macaulay’s Letters on Education: What Constitutes a Philosophical System,” in Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, pp.17–46. (Scholar)
  • Geiger, Marianne B., 1986, Mercy Otis Warren and Catharine Macaulay: Historians in the Transatlantic Republican Tradition, Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University. (Scholar)
  • Green, Karen, 2011, “Will the Real Enlightenment Historian Please Stand Up? Catharine Macaulay versus David Hume,” In Hume and the Enlightenment, C. Taylor and S. Buckle (eds.), London: Pickering and Chatto, pp.39–51. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012a, “Catharine Macaulay: Philosopher of the Enlightenment,” Intellectual History Review, 22 (3): 411–426. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012b, “When is a Contract Theorist not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes,” in Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, N.J. Hirschmann and J.H. Wright (eds.), University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania University Press, pp.169–189. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, A History of Women’s Political Thought in Europe, 1700–1800, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Jane Austen and Catharine Macaulay,” Persuasions, 40: 177–83. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “Catharine Macaulay’s Enlightenment Faith and Radical Politics,” History of European Ideas, 44 (1):38–44. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, Catharine Macaulay’s Republican Enlightenment, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Green, Karen and Shannon Weekes, 2013, “Catharine Macaulay on the Will,” History of European Ideas, 39 (3): 409–425. (Scholar)
  • Guest, Harriet, 2002, “Bluestocking Feminism,” The Huntington Library Quarterly, 65 (1/2): 59–80. (Scholar)
  • Gunther-Canada, Wendy, 1998, “The Politics of Sense and Sensibility: Mary Wollstonecraft and Catherine Macaulay Graham on Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France,” in Women Writers and the Early Modern Political Tradition, H. Smith (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.126–147. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Cultivating Virtue: Catharine Macaulay and Mary Wollstonecraft on Civic Education,” Women and Politics, 25(3): 47–70. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “Catharine Macaulay on the Paradox of Paternal Authority in Hobbesian Politics,” Hypatia, 21(2): 150–173. (Scholar)
  • Hammersley, Rachel, 2010, The English Republican Tradition and eighteenth-century France: between the ancients and the moderns, Manchester: Manchester University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hay, Carla H., 1994, “Catharine Macaulay and the American Revolution,” The Historian, 56 (2): 301–16. (Scholar)
  • Hicks, Philip, 2002, “Catharine Macaulay’s Civil War: Gender, history, and Republicanism in Georgian Britain,” Journal of British Studies, 41 (2): 170–99. (Scholar)
  • Hill, Bridget, 1992, The Republican Virago: The Life and Times of Catharine Macaulay, Historian, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “The Links between Mary Wollstonecraft and Catharine Macaulay: new evidence,” Women’s History Review, 4 (2): 177–92. (Scholar)
  • Hill, Bridget, and Christopher Hill, 1967, “Catharine Macaulay and the Seventeenth Century,” The Welsh History Review, 3: 381–402. (Scholar)
  • Hilton, Mary, 2007, Women and the Shaping of the Nation’s Young: Education and Public Doctrine in Britain 1750–1850. Aldershot: Ashgate. (Scholar)
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2005, “Liberty, Equality and God: The Religious Roots of Catharine Macaulay’s Feminism,” in Women, Gender and Enlightenment, S. Knott and B. Taylor (eds.), Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.538–550. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, “Virtue, God and Stoicism in the thought of Elizabeth Carter and Catharine Macaulay,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women 1400–1800, J. Broad and K. Green (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer, pp.137–148. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “The Persona of the Woman Philosopher in Eighteenth-Century England: Catharine Macaulay, Mary Hays, and Elizabeth Hamilton,” Intellectual History Review, 18 (3): 403–12. (Scholar)
  • Israel, Jonathan, 2010, A Revolution of the Mind: Radical Enlightenment and the Intellectual Origins of Modern Democracy, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, Democratic Enlightenment. Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Letzring, Monica, 1976, “Sarah Prince Gill and the John Adams-Catharine Macaulay Correspondence,” Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 88: 107–111. (Scholar)
  • Looser, Devoney, 2000, British Women Writers and the Writing of History, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “‘Those historical laurels which once graced my brow are now in their wane’: Catherine Macaulay’s last years and legacy,” Studies in Romanticism, 42 (2): 203–25. (Scholar)
  • O’Brien, Karen, 2009, Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pettit, Philip, 1997, Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Pocock, J. G. A., 1998, “Catherine Macaulay: patriot historian,” in Women writers and the early modern British political tradition, H. Smith (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.243–258. (Scholar)
  • Reuter, Martina, 2007, “Catharine Macaulay and Mary Wollstonecraft on the Will,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration. Political Ideas of European Women 1400–1800, J. Broad and K. Green (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer, pp.149–169. (Scholar)
  • Schnorrenberg, Barbara B., 1979, “The Brood-hen of Faction: Mrs. Macaulay and Radical Politics, 1765–75,” Albion, 11: 33–45. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “An Opportunity Missed: Catherine Macaulay on the Revolution of 1688,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, 20: 231–40. (Scholar)
  • Sheridan, Patricia, 2007, “Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The Extent of Catharine Cockburn’s Lockeanism in her Defence of Mr. Locke’s Essay,” Hypatia, 22 (3): 133–51. (Scholar)
  • Skinner, Quentin, 1998, Liberty before Liberalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, Hobbes and Republican Liberty, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Staves, Susan, 1989, “‘The Liberty of a She-Subject of England’: Rights Rhetoric and the Female Thucydides,” Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature, 1(2): 161–83. (Scholar)
  • Titone, Connie, 2004, Gender Equality in the Philosophy of Education: Catherine Macaulay’s Forgotten Contribution, New York: Peter Lang. (Scholar)
  • Walmsley, J. C., Hugh Craig and John Burrows, 2016, “Authorship of Remarks Upon Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding”, Eighteenth-century Thought 6:205–43. (Scholar)
  • Wiseman, Susan, 2001, “Catharine Macaulay: history, republicanism and the public sphere,” in Women, Writing and the Public Sphere, 1700–1830, E. Eger, C. Grant, C. Ó Gallchoir and P. Warburton (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,pp/181–199. (Scholar)
  • Withey, Lynne E., 1976, ”Catherine Macaulay and the Uses of History: Ancient Rights, Perfectionism, and Propaganda,“ Journal of British Studies, 16 (1): 59–83. (Scholar)

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