Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Science and Chinese Philosophy" by Lisa Raphals

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Bodde, D., 1991, Chinese Thought, Science, and Society: The Intellectual and Social Background of Science and Technology in Pre-Modern China, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Bruya, B., et al., 2010, Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Chemla, K. (ed.), 2012, The History of Mathematical Proof in Ancient Traditions, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Chemla, K. and Guo Shuchun, 2004, Les neuf chapitres. Le classique mathématique de la Chine ancienne et ses commentaires, Paris: Dunod.Csikszentmihalyi, M., 2004, Material Virtue Ethics and the Body in Early China, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Csikszentmihalyi, M., and M. Nylan, 2003, “Constructing lineages and inventing traditions through exemplary figures in early China,” T’oung-pao, 89 (1–3): 59–99. (Scholar)
  • Cullen, C., 1976, “A Chinese Eratosthenes of the Flat Earth: A Study of a Fragment of Cosmology in Huai Nan Tzu 淮南子,” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies (BSOAS), 39 (1): 106–27. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, Astronomy and Mathematics in Ancient China: The Zhou Bi Suan Jing, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, Heavenly Numbers: Astronomy and Authority in Early Imperial China, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Da xue (Great Learning), chapter 39 of the Book of Rites (Li ji), in The Sacred Books of the East, vol. 28, ed. F. M. Műller, trans. James Legge, Oxford: Clarendon, 1885, vol. 2, pp. 411–424.
  • Fung, Yu-lan, 1922, “Why China Has No Science – An Interpretation of the History and Consequences of Chinese Philosophy,” International Journal of Ethics, 32 (3): 237–263. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983, A History of Chinese Philosophy, 2 vols, Shanghai, 1931 and 1934, translation of Zhongguo zhexue shi 中國哲學史, trans. Derk Bodde, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Furth, C., 1986, A Flourishing Yin: Gender in China’s Medical History, 960–1665, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Gong, P., 2012, “Cultural history holds back Chinese research,” Nature, 481 (January 26): 411. (Scholar)
  • Graham, A. C., 1978, Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Science, Hong Kong: Chinese University Press and London: School of Oriental and African Studies. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1986, Yin-Yang and the Nature of Correlative Thinking, Singapore: Institute of East Asian Philosophies. (Scholar)
  • Graziani, R., 2008, “The Subject and the Sovereign: Exploring the Self in Early Chinese Self-Cultivation,” in Early Chinese Religion: Part One: Shang Through Han (1250 BC-220 AD) (2 Vols), vol. 1, J. Lagerwey and M. Kalinowski (eds.), Leiden: Brill: 459–517. (Scholar)
  • Han shu 漢書 (Standard History of the Han Dynasty), by Ban Gu 班固 (32–92 CE), Zhonghua shuju, Beijing, 1962.
  • Harper, D., 1998, Early Chinese Medical Literature, London and New York: Kegan Paul International. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Warring States Natural Philosophy and Occult Thought,” in The Cambridge History of Ancient China: From the Origins of Civilization to 221 B.C., M. Loewe and E. L. Shaughnessy (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 813–84. (Scholar)
  • Hou Han shu 後漢書 (Standard History of the Later Han), by Fan Ye 范曄 (398–445), Zhonghua shuju, Beijing, 1962.
  • Huainanzi 淮南子 (Huainan Annals). Zhuzi jicheng edition.
  • Huangdi neijing lingshu 黃帝內經靈樞 (The Inner Classic of the Yellow Lord: Spiritual Pivot), ed. Guo Aichun 郭靄春, Tianjin: Tianjin kexue jishu chubanshe, 1989.
  • Huangdi suwen zhijie 黃帝素問直解 (The Inner Classic of the Yellow Lord: Basic Questions), ed. Gao Shizong 高士宗, Shanghai: Kexue jishu wenxian chubanshe, l980.
  • Kalinowski, M., 2004, “Technical Traditions in Ancient China and Shushu Culture in Chinese Religion,” in Religion and Chinese Society. Volume 1: Ancient and Medieval, J. Lagerwey (ed.), Hong Kong: Chinese University Press, pp. 223–48. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010, “Divination and Astrology: Received Texts and Excavated Manuscripts,” in China’s Early Empires: A Re-appraisal, M. Nylan and M. Loewe (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 338–366. (Scholar)
  • Kohn, L., 2015, “Forget or not forget? The neurophysiology of zuowang,” in New Visions of the Zhuangzi, L. Kohn (ed.), St. Petersburg, FL: Three Pines Press, pp. 161–79. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, Science and the Dao: From the Big Bang to Lived Perfection, St Petersburg: Three Pines Press. (Scholar)
  • Lewis, M. E., 1999, Writing and Authority in Early China, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Li, Ling 李零, 1993, Zhongguo fang shu kao 中國方術考 (Study of the Magical Arts of China), Beijing: Renmin Zhongguo chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000, Zhongguo fang shu xu kao 中國方術續考 (Supplementary Studies of the Magical Arts of China), Beijing: Renmin Zhongguo chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Lo, V., 2001, “The Influence of Nurturing Life Culture,” in Innovation in Chinese Medicine, E. Hsu (ed.), Needham Research Institute Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Self-cultivation and the Popular Medical Traditions,” in Medieval Chinese Medicine: The Dunhuang Medical Manuscripts, V. Lo and C. Cullen (eds.), London: RoutledgeCurzon. (Scholar)
  • Lloyd, G. E. R., 1996, Adversaries and Authorities: Investigations into Ancient Greek and Chinese Science, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lloyd, G. E. R., and N. Sivin, 2002, The Way and the Word: Science and Medicine in Early China and Greece, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Loewe, M., 1994, Divination, Mythology and Monarchy in Han China, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Machle, E. J., 1993, Nature and Heaven in the Xunzi: A Study of the Tian Lun, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Major, J. S., 1993, Heaven and Earth in Early Han Thought, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Miller, J., 2020, China's Green Religion: Daoism and the Quest for a Sustainable Future, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Miller, J., et al. (eds.), 2014, Religion and Ecological Sustainability in China, Oxford and New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Needham, J., 1931, Chemical Embryology, Cambridge:Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1934, A History of Embryology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, rpt. 1959. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1979, The Grand Titration: Science and Society in East and West, Boston: G. Allen & Unwin. (Scholar)
  • Needham, J., with Wang Ling, 1956a, Science and Civilization in China, Vol. 1: Introductory Orientations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1956b, Science and Civilization in China, Vol. 2: History of Scientific Thought, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ngo, V. X., 1976, Divination Magie et Politique dans la Chine Ancienne, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. (Scholar)
  • Pankenier, D. W., 2013, Astrology and Cosmology in Early China: Conforming Earth to Heaven, Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Puett, M., 2002, To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China, Cambridge: Harvard University Asia Center. (Scholar)
  • Raphals, L., 1998, Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008–2009, “Divination in the Han shu Bibliographic Treatise,” Early China, 32: 45–101. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015, “Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2015 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2015/entries/chinese-phil-medicine/>. (Scholar)
  • Rickett, W. A., 1985, Guanzi: Political, Economic and Philosophical Essays from Early China, Volume 1, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sato, M., 2003, The Confucian Quest for Order: The Origin and Formation of the Political Thought of Xun Zi, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Shi ji 史記 (Annals), by Sima Qian 司馬遷 (?145-?86) and others, Beijing: Zhonghua, 1959.
  • Schäfer, D., 2012, Cultures of Knowledge: Technology in Chinese History, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Sivin, N., 1978, “On the Word ‘Taoist’ as a Source of Perplexity, With Special Reference to the Relations of Science and Religion in Traditional China,” History of Religions, 17 (3–4): 303–330. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982, “Why the Scientific Revolution Did Not Take Place in China – Or Didn’t It?” Chinese Science, 5: 45–66. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988, “Science and Medicine in Imperial China – The State of the Field,” Journal of Asian Studies, 47: 41–90. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “Science and Medicine in Chinese History,” in Heritage of China. Contemporary Perspectives on Chinese Civilization, P. S. Ropp (ed.), Berkeley: University of California Press: 164–96. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “State Cosmos and Body in the Last Three Centuries B.C.E.,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 55 (1): 5–37. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995b, “Taoism and Science,” in Medicine, Philosophy and Religion in Ancient China. Researches and Reflections. Variorum Collected Studies Series, Aldershott: Variorum, No. 8, pp. 1–73. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, Granting the Seasons: The Chinese Astronomical Reform of 1280, With a Study of Its Many Dimensions and a Translation of its Records, New York: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Slingerland, E. T., 2012, Creating Consilience: Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Smith, K., 2003, “Sima Tan and the invention of Daoism, ‘Legalism,’ et cetera,” Journal of Asian Studies, 62 (1): 129–56. (Scholar)
  • Unschuld, P. U. and H. Tessenow, 2011, Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: An Annotated Translation of Huang Di’s Inner Classic – Basic Questions, 2 volumes, University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Veith, I., 1972, The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, Chapters 1–34, Berkeley: University of California. (Scholar)
  • Xunzi: A Translation and Study of the Complete Works, by John Knoblock, Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 1994, 3 vols.
  • Yates, R. D. S., 1988, “New Light on Ancient Chinese Military Texts: Notes on Their Nature and Evolution, and the Development of Military Specialization in Warring States China,” T'oung-Pao, 74 (4-5): 214-15. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Science and Technology,” in Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy, A. S. Cua (ed.), New York and London: Routledge: 657–63. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Medicine for Women in Early China: A Preliminary Survey,” Nan Nü, 7 (2): 127–181. (Scholar)

Generated Sun May 22 04:32:00 2022