Linked bibliography for the SEP article "The Ethics of Clinical Research" by David Wendler

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Angell, M., 2008. “Industry sponsored clinical research: a broken system,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 80: 899–904. (Scholar)
  • Appelbaum, P.S., with C.W. Lidz and T. Grisso, 2004. “Therapeutic misconception in clinical research: frequency and risk factors,” IRB: Ethics and Human Research, 26: 1–8. (Scholar)
  • Australian Government. National Health and Medical Research Council. 1999. National statement on ethical conduct in research involving humans. Ch 2.1: 92. Commonwealth of Australia, 1999. (Scholar)
  • Beecher, H. K., 1966. “Ethics and clinical research,” N Engl J Med, 274: 1354–60. (Scholar)
  • Brock, D. W., 1994. “Ethical issues in exposing children to risks in research,” Chapter 3 (pp. 81–101) of Grodin and Glantz (eds.), Children as Research Subjects, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brody, B.A., 1998. The Ethics of Biomedical Research: An International Perspective, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Caldwell, P.H.Y., with S.B. Murphy, P.H. Butow, and J.C. Craig, 2004. “Clinical trials in children,” Lancet, 364: 803–11. (Scholar)
  • Caplan, A., 1984. “Is there a duty to serve as a subject in biomedical research?” IRB: Ethics and Human Research, 6: 1–5. (Scholar)
  • Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, 2002. International ethical guidelines for biomedical research involving human subjects. Geneva: CIOMS. (Scholar)
  • Croghan, T.W., and P.M. Pittman, 2004. “The medicine cabinet: What’s in it, why, and can we change the contents?” Health Affairs, 23: 23–33. (Scholar)
  • D’Arcy Hart, P., 1999. “A change in scientific approach: From alternation to randomised allocation in clinical trials in the 1940s,” BMJ, 319: 572–3. (Scholar)
  • Department of Health and Human Services, 2005. Code of Federal Regulations: Title 45 (Public Welfare). Part 46: protection of human subjects (45 CFR 46). US Government Printing Office. (Scholar)
  • Dworkin, R., 1989, “The original position,” in Reading Rawls, Norman Daniels (ed.), Stanford: Stanford University Press, 16–53. (Scholar)
  • Dworkin, G., 2005. “Paternalism,” in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <Paternalism/">https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2005/entries/Paternalism/>. (Scholar)
  • Elliott, C., 2008, “Guinea-pigging,” The New Yorker, January 7, 2008, p. 36. (Scholar)
  • Emanuel, E.J., with D. Wendler and C. Grady 2000. “What makes clinical research ethical?,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 283: 2701–11. (Scholar)
  • Faden, R.R., and T.L. Beauchamp, 1986. A History and Theory of Informed Consent, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 200–232. (Scholar)
  • Featherstone, K., and J.L. Donovan, 2002. “Why don’t they just tell me straight, why allocate it? The struggle to make sense of participating in a randomised controlled trial,” Social Science and Medicine, 55: 709–19. (Scholar)
  • Feinberg, J., 1986. Harm to Self, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 3–26. (Scholar)
  • Field, M.J., and R.E. Behrman, 2004. The Ethical Conduct of Clinical Research Involving Children, Washington DC: National Academies Press, Ch. 2. (Scholar)
  • Flory, J., and E. Emanuel, 2004. “Interventions to improve research participants’ understanding in informed consent for research: A systematic review,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 292: 1593–1601. (Scholar)
  • Fontanarosa P.B., with A. Flanagin A. and C.D. DeAngelis, 2005. “Reporting conflicts of interest, financial aspects of research, and role of sponsors in funded studies,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 294: 110–11. (Scholar)
  • Freedman, B., 1987. “Equipoise and the ethics of clinical research,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 317: 141–45. (Scholar)
  • Friedman M., 1970, “The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits,” The New York Times Magazine, September 13, 1970. (Scholar)
  • Garattini S., 1997. “Are me-too drugs justified?,” J Nephrol, 10: 283–94. (Scholar)
  • Gauthier, D., 1990. Morals by Agreement, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Gifford, F., 2007. “Pulling the plug on clinical equipoise: A critique of Miller and Weijer,” Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, 17: 203–26. (Scholar)
  • Goodyear, M.D., with K. Krleza-Jeric and T. Lemmens, 2007. “The Declaration of Helsinki,” BMJ, 335: 624–5. (Scholar)
  • Grady, C., 2005. “Payment of clinical research subjects,” J Clin Invest, 115: 1681–7. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, J., 1986. Well-being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance, Oxford: Clarendon. (Scholar)
  • Grodin, M.A., and G.J. Annas, 1996. “Legacies of Nuremberg: Medical ethics and human rights,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 276: 1682–83. (Scholar)
  • Harmon, A., 2010. “Indian Tribe Wins Fight to Limit Research of Its DNA,” New York Times, 21 April 2010. (Scholar)
  • Harris, J., 2005. “Scientific research is a moral duty,” Journal of Medical Ethics, 31: 242–48. (Scholar)
  • Hayenhjelm, M., and J. Wolff, 2012. “The moral problem of risk impositions: A survey of the literature,” European Journal of Philosophy, 20 (Supplement S1): E26–E51. (Scholar)
  • Hellman, S., and D.S. Hellman, 1991. “Of mice but not men: Problems of the randomized clinical trial,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 324: 1585–89. (Scholar)
  • Heyd, D., 1996. “Experimentation on trial: Why should one take part in medical research?”, Jahrbuch fur Recht und Ethik [Annual Review of Law and Ethics], 4: 189–204. (Scholar)
  • Huskamp, H.A., 2006. “Prices, profits, and innovation: Examining criticisms of new psychotropic drugs’ value,” Health Affairs, 25: 635–46. (Scholar)
  • Jonas, H., 1969. “Philosophical reflections on experimenting with human subjects”, Daedalus, 98: 219–247. (Scholar)
  • Katz, J., 1996. “The Nuremberg Code and the Nuremberg trial. A reappraisal,” Journal of the American Medical Association 276: 1662–6. (Scholar)
  • Kopelman, L.M., 2000. “Children as research subjects: A dilemma,” Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 25: 745–64. (Scholar)
  • Kupst, M.J., with A.F. Patenaude, G.A. Walco, and C. Sterling, 2003. “Clinical trials in pediatric cancer: Parental perspectives on informed consent,” Journal of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, 25: 787–90. (Scholar)
  • Lazarou, J., with B.H. Pomeranz and P.N. Corey, 1998. “Incidence of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients: A meta-analysis of prospective studies,” Journal of the American Medical Association; 279: 1200–05. (Scholar)
  • Lederer, S.E., 1995. Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Children as guinea pigs: Historical perspective,” Accountability in Research, 10(1): 1–16. (Scholar)
  • Lederer, S.E., and M.A. Grodin, “Historical overview: Pediatric experimentation,” in M.A. Grodin and L.H. Glantz (eds.), Children as Research Subjects: Science, Ethics and Law, New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. (Scholar)
  • Levine, R.J., 1988. Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research. 2nd ed. New Haven, Conn: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Macklin, R., 1981. “Due and undue inducements: On paying money to research subjects,” IRB: A Review of Human Subjects Research, 3: 1–6. (Scholar)
  • Mervis, J., 2004. “U.S. Science budget: Caught in a squeeze between tax cuts and military spending,” Science, 30: 587. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008. “U.S. Budget: Promising year ends badly after fiscal showdown squeezes science,” Science, 319: 18–9. (Scholar)
  • Mill, John Stuart, 1869, On Liberty. Page reference to On Liberty and Other Writings, Stefan Collini (ed.), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2005, 12th edition. (Scholar)
  • Miller, F.G., and H. Brody, 2007. “Clinical equipoise and the incoherence of research ethics,” Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 32: 151–65. (Scholar)
  • Miller, F.G., and A. Wertheimer, 2007. “Facing up to paternalism in research ethics,” Hastings Center Report, 37: 24–34. (Scholar)
  • Miller, P.B., and C. Weijer, 2006. “Trust based obligations of the state and physician-researchers to patient-subjects,” Journal of Medical Ethics, 32: 542–47. (Scholar)
  • National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), 2001. Ethical and Policy Issues in Research Involving Human Participants. Washington, DC: NBAC. (Scholar)
  • Nicholson, R.H., 1986. Medical Research with Children: Ethics, Law, Practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pages 87–100. (Scholar)
  • Nuremberg Code, 1947, in Trials of war criminals before the Nuremberg Military Tribunals under Control Council Law No. 10, Vol. 2, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1949, pp. 181–182. Reprinted in Journal of the American Medical Association, 276: 1961. (Scholar)
  • Psaty, B.M., and R.A. Kronmal, 2008. “Reporting mortality findings in trials of rofecoxib for Alzheimer disease or cognitive impairment: A case study based on documents from rofecoxib litigation,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 299: 1813–7. (Scholar)
  • Ramsey, P., 1978. “Ethical dimensions of experimental research on children”, in Research on Children: Medical Imperatives, Ethical Quandaries, and Legal Constraints, J. van Eys (ed.), Baltimore: University Park Press, p. 61. (Scholar)
  • Rawls, J., 1999. A Theory of Justice. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Resnik, D.B., 2005. “Eliminating the daily life risks standard from the definition of minimal risk,” Journal of Medical Ethics, 31: 35–8. (Scholar)
  • Rid, A., and D. Wendler, 2011. “A framework for risk-benefit evaluations in biomedical research,” ennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, 21(2): 141–179.
  • Roberts, R., with W. Rodriquez, D. Murphy, and T. Crescenzi, 2003. “Pediatric drug labeling: Improving the safety and efficacy of pediatric therapies,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 290: 905–11. (Scholar)
  • Ross, L.F., and R.M. Nelson, 2006. “Pediatric research and the federal minimal risk standard,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 295: 759. (Scholar)
  • Rothman, D.J., 2000. “The shame of medical research”, The New York Review of Books, 47 (19): 60–64. (Scholar)
  • Sachs, Ben, 2010. “The exceptional ethics of the investigator-subject relationship,” Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 35: 64–80. (Scholar)
  • Shuster, E., 1997. “Fifty years later: The significance of the Nuremberg Code,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 337: 1436–40. (Scholar)
  • Slovic, P., 1987. “Perception of risk,” Science, 236: 280–85. (Scholar)
  • Snowdon, C., with J. Garcia, and D. Elbourne, 1997. “Making sense of randomization: Responses of parents of critically ill babies to random allocation of treatment in a clinical trial,” Social Science and Medicine, 45: 1337–55. (Scholar)
  • Spilker, B., 1991. Guide to clinical trials. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. (Scholar)
  • Stark, C., 2000. “Hypothetical consent and justification,” Journal of Philosophy, 97: 313–34. (Scholar)
  • Stewart, Paul M., with Anna Stears, Jeremy W. Tomlinson, and Morris J. Brown, 2008. “Regulation—the real threat to clinical research,” British Medical Journal, 337: 1085–1087. (Scholar)
  • Sullivan, Richard, 2008. “The good, the bad and the ugly: Effect of regulation on cancer research,” Lancet Oncology, 9: 2–3. (Scholar)
  • Sutton, G., 2003. “Putrid gums and ‘dead men’s cloaths’: James Lind aboard the Salisbury,” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 96: 605–8. (Scholar)
  • Tversky, A., and D. Kahneman, 1974. “Judgments under uncertainty: Heuristics and biases,” Science, 185: 1124–31. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1981, “The framing of decisions and the rationality of choice,” Science, 211: 453–8. (Scholar)
  • Vollmann J., and R. Winau, 1996. “Informed consent in human experimentation before the Nuremberg code,” British Medical Journal, 313: 1445–7. (Scholar)
  • Weinstein, N., 1989. “Optimistic biases about personal risks,” Science, 246: 1232–3. (Scholar)
  • Wenar, L., 2008. “John Rawls”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2008 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2008/entries/rawls/>. (Scholar)
  • Wendler, D., 2010, The Ethics of Pediatric Research, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wertheimer, A., 2008. “Exploitation”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2008 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <Exploitation/">https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/Exploitation/>. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010, Rethinking the Ethics of Clinical Research: Widening the Lens, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wilson, James, and David Hunter, 2010. “Research exceptionalism,” American Journal of Bioethics, 10: 45–54. (Scholar)
  • World Medical Organization, 1996. Declaration of Helsinki, British Medical Journal, 313 (7070): 1448–1449. (Scholar)

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