Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Animal Cognition" by Kristin Andrews

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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  • Abbott, D. H., Keverne, E. B., Bercovitch, F. B., Shively, C. A., Mendoza, S. P., Saltzman, W., Snowdon, C. T., Ziegler, T. E., Banjevic, M., Garland, T., Jr., & Sapolsky, R. M. (2003). “Are Subordinates Always Stressed? A Comparative Analysis of Rank Differences in Cortisol Levels Among Primates.” Hormones and Behavior, 43: 67–82. (Scholar)
  • Allen, C. (1999). “Animal Concepts Revisited: The Use of Self-Monitoring as an Empirical Approach.” Erkenntnis, 51(1): 33–40. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2002).“A Skeptic’s Progress” Biology and Philosophy, 17: 695–702. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2004). “Is Anyone a Cognitive Ethologist?Biology and Philosophy, 19: 589–607. (Scholar)
  • Allen, C. & Hauser, M. (1996). “Concept Attribution in Nonhuman Animals: Theoretical and Methodological Problems in Ascribing Complex Mental Processes.” In M. Bekoff & D. Jamieson (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. Cambridge MA, MIT Press. 47–62. (Scholar)
  • Allen, C. & Bekoff, M. (1997). Species of Mind: The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology. Cambridge MA, MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Allen, C. & Saidel, E. (1998). “The Evolution of Reference.” In D. Cummins & C. Allen (eds.), The Evolution of Mind. New York, Oxford University Press. 183–202. (Scholar)
  • Allen-Hermanson, S. (2005). “Morgan’s Canon Revisited.” Philosophy of Science, 72: 608–631. (Scholar)
  • Amy, M., Sprau, P., de Goede, P. & Naguib, M. (2010). “Effects of personality on territory defence in communication networks: A playback experiment with radio-tagged great tits.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (Scholar)
  • Andrews, K. (2002). “Interpreting Autism: A Critique of Davidson on Thought and Language.” Philosophical Psychology, 15: 317–332. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2005). “Chimpanzee Theory of Mind: Looking in all the Wrong Places?Mind and Language, 20: 521–536. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2009). “Politics or Metaphysics? On Attributing Psychological Properties to Animals.” Biology and Philosophy, 24(1): 51–63. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2011). “Beyond Anthropomorphism: Attributing Psychological Properties to Animals”. In Tom Beauchamp & R.G. Frey (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford University Press. 469–494. (Scholar)
  • –––.(2012a)Do Ape Read Minds? Toward a New Folk Psychology. MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • –––.(2012b) Review of Lurz Mindreading Animals. Notre Dame Philosophical Review. March 30, 2012b. (Scholar)
  • –––. (forthcoming). “A Role for Folk Psychology in Animal Cognition Research.” In Andreas Blank, ed. Animals: Basic Philosophical Concepts. Philosophia: Munich. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2015). The Animal Mind: The Philosophy of Animal Cognition. Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Andrews, K. & Huss, B. (2014). “Anthropomorphism, Anthropectomy, and the Null HypothesisBiology and Philosophy 29(5): 711–729. (Scholar)
  • Andrews, K. & Radenovic, L. (2012). “Confronting Language, Representation, and Belief: A Limited Defense of Mental Continuity.” In Jennifer Vonk & Todd Shackelford (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Aquinas, S. T. Summa Theologica. Grand Rapids, Christian Classics, 1981.
  • Arbib, M. A. (2002). “The mirror system, imitation, and the evolution of language.” In K. Dautenhahn and C. L. Nehaniv (eds.), Imitation in animals and artifacts: Complex adaptive systems, pp. 229–280. Cambridge: MIT Pres (Scholar)
  • Arbib, M. A., Liebal, K., & Pika, S. (2008). “Primate vocalization, gesture, and the evolution of language.” Current Anthropology, 49(6): 1053–1076. (Scholar)
  • Aristotle. The Metaphysics. New York, Penguin Classics, 1999.
  • Armstrong, D. M. (1973). Belief, Truth and Knowledge. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Asquith, P. J. (1991). “Primate Research Groups in Japan: Orientations and East-West Differences.” In L. Fedigan & P. J. Asquith (eds.), The Monkeys of Arashiyama. Thirty-five Years of Research in Japan and the West, pp. 81–98, Albany: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • –––. (1997). “Why Anthropomorphism is not Metaphor: Crossing Concepts and Cultures in Animal Behavior Studies.” In R. W. Mitchell, N. S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals, pp. 22–36, Albany: State University of New York. (Scholar)
  • Baillargeon, R. & DeVos, J. (1991). “Object Permanence in Young Infants: Further Evidence.” Child Development, 62: 1227–1246. (Scholar)
  • Barlow, H. (1990). “The Mechanical Mind.” Annual Review of Neuroscience, 13: 15–24. (Scholar)
  • Barrett, L. (2011). Beyond the Brain: How Body and Environment Shape Animal and Human Minds. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Barrett, L., & Henzi, P. (2005). “The Social Nature of Primate Cognition.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 272: 1865–1875. (Scholar)
  • Barrett, L., P. Henzi & D. Kendall. (2007). “Social brains, simple minds: Does social complexity really require cognitive complexity?” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 362(1480): 561–575. (Scholar)
  • Barton, R., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (1997). “Evolution of the Social Brain.” In A. Whiten & R. Byrne (eds.), Machiavellian Intelligence II: Evaluations and Extensions, pp. 240–263, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Basile, B. M., Schroeder, G. R., Brown, E. K., Templer, V. L., & Hampton, R. R. (2015). “Evaluation of seven hypotheses for metamemory performance in rhesus monkeys.” Journal of Experimental Psychology General , 144(1), 85–102. (Scholar)
  • Bateson, P. & Mameli, M. (2007). “The innate and the acquired: Useful clusters of a residual distinction from folk biology?” Developmental Psychobiology, 49(8): 818–831. (Scholar)
  • Beck, B. B. (1982). “Chimpocentrism: Bias in Cognitive Ethology.” Journal of Human Evolution, 11: 3–17. (Scholar)
  • Beck, J. (2012). “The Generality Constraint and the Structure of Thought.” Mind 121(483): 563–600. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2013). “Why We Can’t Say What Animals Think.” Philosophical Psychology 26(4):520–546. (Scholar)
  • Beecher, M. D., Burt, J. M., O’Loghlen, A. L., Templeton, C. N., & Campbell, S. E. (2007). “Bird Song Learning in an Eavesdropping Context.” Animal Behavior, 73: 929–935. (Scholar)
  • Bekoff, M. (2001). “Social Play Behaviour: Cooperation, Fairness, Trust, and the Evolution of Morality.” Journal of Consciousness Studies, 8: 81–90. (Scholar)
  • Bekoff, M., & Allen, C. (1997). “Cognitive Ethology: Slayers, Skeptics and Proponents.” In R. W. Mitchell, N. S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals, pp. 313–334, Albany: State University of New York Press. 313–334. (Scholar)
  • Bekoff, M. & Pierce, J. (2009). Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Bennett, J. (1978). “Some Remarks about Concepts.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1: 557–560. (Scholar)
  • Beran, M., J. Brandl, J. Perner, & J. Proust (Eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition (p. 76). Oxford University Press.
  • Bermúdez, J. (2003a). Thinking Without Words. Cambridge MA, MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2003b). “Nonconceptual content: From perceptual experience to subpersonal computational states.” In Y.H. Gunther (ed.), Essays in Nonconceptual content. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2006). “Animal Reasoning and Proto-Logic.” In S. Hurley and M. Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford, Oxford University Press. 127–138. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2009). “Mindreading in the animal kingdom.” In Robert Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds, pp. 145–164, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Beynon, P., & Rasa, O. A. E. (1989). “Do Dwarf Mongooses Have a Language? Warning Vocalizations Transmit Complex Information.” Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Wetenskap, 85: 447–450. (Scholar)
  • Blumberg, M. S., & Wasserman, E. A. (1995). “Animal Mind and the Argument from Design.” American Psychologist, 50: 133–144. (Scholar)
  • Boesch, C. (2002). “Cooperative Hunting Roles among Taie Chimpanzees.” Human Nature, 13: 27–46. (Scholar)
  • Bolhuis, J. J., Okanoya, K., & Scharff, C. (2010). “Twitter evolution: converging mechanisms in birdsong and human speech.” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 11(11), 747–759. (Scholar)
  • Boysen, S. T. & Berntson, G. G. (1989). “Numerical Competence in a Chimpanzee.” Journal of Comparative Psychology, 103: 23–31. (Scholar)
  • Brandom, R. (1994). Making It Explicit: Reasoning, Representing, and Discursive Commitment. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brauer, J., Kaminski, J., Riedel, J., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2006). “Making Inference about the Location of Hidden Foods: Social Dog, Causal Ape.” Journal of Comparative Psychology, 120: 38–47. (Scholar)
  • Brosnan, S.F., & Bshary, R. (2010). “Cooperation and deception: from evolution to mechanisms.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 365: 2593–2598. (Scholar)
  • Brown, J. L. (1975). The Evolution of Behavior. New York: W.W. Norton. (Scholar)
  • Buckner, C. (2011). Two approaches to the distinction between cognition and mere association International Journal for Comparative Psychology 24(1), 1–35. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2013). Morgan’s Canon, meet Hume’s Dictum: Avoiding anthropofabulation in cross-species comparisons. Biology & Philosophy, 28(5): 853–871. (Scholar)
  • Bugnyar, T., Reber, S. A., Buckner, C. (2016). Ravens attribute visual access to unseen competitors. Nature Communications, 7, 10506. (Scholar)
  • Bugnyar, T., Schwab, C., Schloegl, C., Kotrschal, K., Heinrich, B. (2007). “Ravens judge competitors through experience with play caching.” Current Biology, 17(20): 1804–1808. (Scholar)
  • Burkart, J. M., Allon, O., Amici, F., Fichtel, C., Finkenwirth, C., Heschl, A.,Huber J., Isler K., Kosonen ZK., Martins E., Meulman EJ., Richiger R., Rueth K., Spillmann B., Wiesendanger S., van Schaik, C. P. (2014). The evolutionary origin of human hyper-cooperation. Nature Communications, 5, 4747. (Scholar)
  • Byrne, R. (1997). “What’s the Use of Anecdotes? Distinguishing Psychological Mechanisms in Primate Tactical Deception.” In R. W. Mitchell & N. S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Albany: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • –––. (1999). “Imitation Without Intentionality: Using String Parsing to Copy the Organization of Behavior.” Animal Cognition, 2: 63–72. (Scholar)
  • Byrne, R. & Russon, A. (1998). “Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21: 667–721. (Scholar)
  • Byrne, R. & Whiten, A. (eds.) (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Byrnit, J. (2015). Primates´ socio-cognitive abilities: What kind of comparisons makes sense? Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science. 49(3):485–511. (Scholar)
  • Call, J. & Carpenter, M. (2001). “Do Apes and Children Know What They Have Seen?” Animal Cognition, 4: 207–220. (Scholar)
  • Call, J. (2004). Inferences about the location of food in the great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus). Journal of Comparative Psychology 118(2): 232–241. (Scholar)
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  • –––. (2008). “Meta-cognition in Animals: A Skeptical Look.” Mind and Language, 23(1): 58–89. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2009). “Invertebrate concepts confront the generality constraint.” In Robert Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Carruthers, P., & Ritchie, J. B. (2012). “The Emergence of Metacognition: Affect and Uncertainty in Animals. In M. Beran, J. Brandl, J. Perner, & J. Proust (Eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition (p. 76). Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cavalieri, P., & Singer, P. (1994). The Great Ape Project: Equality Beyond Humanity. New York: St. Martin’s Press. (Scholar)
  • Chater, N. & Heyes, C. (1994). “Animal Concepts: Content and Discontent.” Mind and Language, 9: 209–246. (Scholar)
  • Cheney, D.L. & Seyfarth, R.M. (1990). How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species. The University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––. (2007). Baboon Metaphysics: The Evolution of a Social Mind. University Of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Chomsky, N. (1968). Language and Mind. New York, Harcourt, Brace and World. (Scholar)
  • –––. (1980). “Human Language and Other Semiotic Systems”. In T. A. Sebeok & J. Umiker-Sebeok (eds.), Speaking of Apes: A Critical Anthology of Two-Way Communication with Man. pp. 429–440. New York: Plenum Press. (Scholar)
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  • –––. (1983). “Intentional Systems in Cognitive Ethology: The ‘Panglossian Paradigm’ Defended.” Behavioral and Brian Sciences, 6: 343–390. (Scholar)
  • –––. (1987). The Intentional Stance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
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  • Griffin, D. R. (1984). Animal Thinking, Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
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  • –––. (1992). Animal Minds. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
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  • Hampton, R.R. (2001). “Rhesus Monkeys Know When They Remember.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 98: 5359–5362. (Scholar)
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  • –––. (2001). “Do Chimpanzees Know What Conspecifics Know?” Animal Behavior, 6(1): 139–151. (Scholar)
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