Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia" by Lisa Shapiro

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Primary Sources

  • Barclay, Robert, 1870, Reliquiae Barclaianae: Correspondence of Colonel David Barclay and Robert Barclay of Urie, London: Winter & Bailey, Lithograph. (Scholar)
  • Blom, John, 1978, Descartes: His Moral Philosophy and Psychology, New York: New York University Press. (Includes translation of much of the Descartes-Elisabeth correspondence.) (Scholar)
  • Descartes, René, 1996, Oeuvres. Vol. III–V, Charles Adam and Paul Tannery (eds.), Paris: Vrin (cited internally by AT followed by volume and page number). (Scholar)
  • –––, 1984–1991, The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. I–III, John Cottingham, Robert Stoothof and Dugald Murdoch(eds.), and for Vol III, Anthony Kenny (eds.), London: Cambridge University Press (cited internally as CSM or CSMK, followed by volume and page number). (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989, Correspondance avec Elisabeth, Jean-Marie Beyssade and Michelle Beyssade (eds.), Paris: Garnier-Flammarion. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, Der Briefwechsel zwischen René Descartes und Elisabeth von der Pfalz, Benno Wirz, Isabelle Wienand and Olivier Ribordy (eds.), Hamburg: Meiner. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1935, Lettres sur la morale: corréspondence avec la princesse Elisabeth, Chanut et la reine Christine, Jacques Chevalier (ed.), Paris: Hatier-Boivin. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1657–67, Lettres de Monsieur Descartes, Claude Clerselier (ed.), 3 vols. Paris:Angot. (Scholar)
  • Elisabeth van der Pfalz and René Descartes, Der Briefeschel zwischen Elisabeth van der Pfalz und René Descartes, Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed. and transl), Paderborn: Verlag Wilhelm Fink, 2015.
  • Foucher de Careil, Alexandre, 1879, Descartes, la Princesse Elisabeth et la Reine Christine, Paris: Felix Alcan. (Scholar)
  • Malebranche, Nicholas, 1961, Oeuvres. Vol. XVIII, André Robinet (ed.), Paris: Vrin. (Scholar)
  • Müller, Frederick. 1876, “27 onuitgegeven brieven aan Descartes,” De Nederlandsche Spectator, 336–39. (Scholar)
  • Nye, Andrea, 1999, The Princess and the Philosopher: Letters of Elisabeth of the Palatine to René Descartes, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Penn, William, 1695 and 1714, An Account of W. Penn’s Travails in Holland and Germany, Anno MDCLXXVII, London: T. Sowle. (Scholar)
  • Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, 2007, The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, Lisa Shapiro (ed. and transl.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Reynolds, Edward, 1640, Treatise of the Passions and the Faculties of the Soule of Man, London: Robert Bostock, facsimile reproduction, Margaret Lee Wiley (ed.), Gainesville, FL: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1971. (Scholar)
  • Strickland, Lloyd (ed. and transl.), 2011, Leibniz and the Two Sophies: The Philosophical Correspondence, Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies. (Scholar)
  • Verbeek, Theo, Erik-Jan Bos and Jeroen van de Ven (eds.), 2003, The Correspondence of René Descartes 1643, Utrecht: Zeno Institute for Philosophy. (Scholar)

Secondary Sources

  • Adam, Charles, 1917, Descartes et ses amities féminines, Paris: Boivin. (Scholar)
  • Akkerman, Nadine, 2021, “Elisabeth of Bohemia’s Aristocratic Upbringing and Education at the Prinsenhof, Rapenburg 4–10, Leiden, c. 1627/8–1632,” in S. Ebbersmeyer and S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 17–32. (Scholar)
  • Alanen, Lilli, 2021, “The Soul’s Extension: Elisabeth’s Solution to Descartes’s Mind-Body Problem,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 145–162. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Descartes and Elisabeth: A Philosophical Dialogue?” in Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, Lilli Alanen and Charlotte Witt (eds.), New York/Dordrecht: Kluwer, 193–218. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, Descartes’s Concept of Mind, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Blaze de Bury, Marie Pauline Rose Stewart, 1853, Memoirs of the Princess Palatine, Princess of Bohemia, London: Richard Bentley. (Scholar)
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2002, Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Broughton, Janet and Ruth Mattern, 1978: “Reinterpreting Descartes on the Notion of the Union of Mind and Body,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 16(1): 23–32. (Scholar)
  • Clatterbaugh, Kenneth, 1999, The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy 1637–1739, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Creese, Anna, 1993, The letters of Elisabeth, Princess Palatine: A seventeenth century correspondence, Ph.D. Dissertation (Princeton University), Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International 9328035. (Scholar)
  • De Baar, Mirjam, 2021, “Elisabeth of Bohemia’s Lifelong Friendship with Anna Maria van Schurman (1607–1678),” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 33–50. (Scholar)
  • Ebbersmeyer, Sabrina, 2021, “Elisabeth of Bohemia and the Sciences: the case of Astronomy,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 51–70. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, “An Inventory of the Extant Correspondence of Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Palatine (1618–1680),” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 58(2): 325–98. (Scholar)
  • Ebbersmeyer, Sabrina and Sarah Hutton (eds.), 2021, Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–1680): A Philosopher in her Historical Context, Dordrecht: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Foucher de Careil, Alexandre, 1862, Descartes et la Princesse Palatine, ou de l’influence du cartésianisme sur les femmes au XVIIe siécle, Paris: Auguste Durand. (Scholar)
  • Gabbey, Alan, 1990, “The Case of Mechanics: One revolution or many?” in Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution, David C. Lindberg and Robert S. Westman (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Garber, Daniel, 1992, Descartes’ Metaphysical Physics, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, “Descartes’ Physics” in The Cambridge Companion to Descartes, John Cottingham (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983, “Understanding Interaction: What Descartes Should Have Told Elisabeth,” Southern Journal of Philosophy (Supplement), 21: 15–37. (Scholar)
  • Garber, Daniel, John Henry, Lynn Joy and Alan Gabbey, 1998, “New Doctrines of body and its powers, place and space” in The Cambridge History of Seventeenth Century Philosophy, Daniel Garber and Michael Ayers (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Garber, Daniel and Margaret Wilson, 1998, “Mind-body problems” in The Cambridge History of Seventeenth Century Philosophy, Daniel Garber and Michael Ayers (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Godfrey, Elizabeth, 1909, A Sister of Prince Rupert: Elizabeth Princess Palatine and Abbess of Herford, London and New York: John Lane. (Scholar)
  • Harth, Erica, 1992, Cartesian Women: Versions and Subversions of Rational Discourse in the Old Regime, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hatfield, Gary, 1992, “Descartes’ physiology and its relation to his psychology” in The Cambridge Companion to Descartes, John Cottingham, (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2021, “Princess Elisabeth and Anne Conway (1631–1679): the Interconnected Circles of Two Philosophical Women,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 71–88. (Scholar)
  • Janssen-Lauret, Frédérique, 2018, “Elisabeth of Bohemia as a Naturalist Dualist” in Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Emily Thomas, (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kambouchner, Denis, 2021, “What is Elisabeth’s Cartesianism?” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 205–214. (Scholar)
  • Kolesnik-Antoine, D. and M.-F. Pellegrin (eds.), 2012, Elisabeth de Boheme face a Descartes: Deux Philosophes, Paris: Vrin. (Scholar)
  • Marshall, John, 1998, Descartes’s Moral Theory, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mattern, Ruth, 1978, “Descartes’s Correspondence with Elizabeth: Concerning Both the Union and Distinction of Mind and Body,” in Descartes: Critical and Interpretative Essays, Michael Hooker (ed.), Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mesnard, Pierre, 1936, Essai sur la morale de Descartes, Paris: Boivin &Cie. (Scholar)
  • Nadler, Steven (ed.), 1993, Causation in Early Modern Philosophy, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Néel, Marguerite, 1946, Descartes et la princess Elisabeth, Paris: Editions Elzévier. (Scholar)
  • Nye, Andrea, 1996, “Polity and Prudence: The Ethics of Elisabeth, Princess Palatine” in Hypatia’s Daughters, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • O’Neill, Eileen, 1998, “Disappearing Ink: Early Modern Women Philosophers and Their Fate in History,” in Philosophy in a Feminist Voice, Janet A Kourany (ed.), Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Women Cartesians, ‘Feminine Philosophy’ and Historical Exclusion” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, “Mind-Body Interaction and Metaphysical Consistency: A defense of Descartes,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 25(2): 227–45. (Scholar)
  • Paganini, Gianni, 2021, “Elisabeth and Descartes read Machiavelli in the time of Hobbes,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 109–126. (Scholar)
  • Pal, Carol, 2021, “A Persistent Princess: How Elisabeth of Bohemia Constructed her Personal Politics,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 89–108. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, Republic of Women: Rethinking the Republic of Letters in the Seventeenth Century, New York/Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pellegrin, Marie-Frédérique, 2021, “The Feminine Body in the Correspondence between Descartes and Elisabeth,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 193–204. (Scholar)
  • Perler, Dominick, 2021, “Is Our Happiness Up to Us? Elisabeth on the Limits of Internalism,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 177–192. (Scholar)
  • Petit, Léon, 1969, Descartes et Princesse Elisabeth: roman d’amour vécu, Paris: A-G Nizet. (Scholar)
  • Radner, Daisie, 1971, “Descartes’ Notion of the Union of Mind and Body,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 9: 159–71. (Scholar)
  • Reuter, Martina, 2021, “Elisabeth on Free Will, Preordination, and Philosophical Doubt,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 163–176. (Scholar)
  • Richardson, RC, 1982, “The ‘Scandal’ of Cartesian Interactionism,” Mind, 92: 20–37. (Scholar)
  • Rodis-Lewis, Genevieve, 1999, “Descartes et les femmes: l’exceptionnel rapport de la princesse Elisabeth” in Donna Filosofia e cultura nel seicento, Pina Totaro (ed.), Rome: Consiglio Nazionale delle recherche, 155–72. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1957, La morale de Descartes, Paris: PUF. (Scholar)
  • Rozemond, Marleen, 1998, Descartes’s Dualism, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction: What’s the Problem?”, Journal of the History of Philosophy, 37(3): 435–467. (Scholar)
  • Scheibinger, Londa, 1989, The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Schmaltz, Tad, 2019, “Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia on the Cartesian Mind: Interaction, Happiness, Freedom,” in Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought, E. O’Neill and M. Lascano (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Shapiro, Lisa, 2021, “Princess Elisabeth and the Challenges of Philosophizing,” in S. Ebbersmeyer & S. Hutton (eds.) 2021, pp. 127–144. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, “Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia as a Cartesian,” in Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism, Tad Schmaltz and Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 287–302. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, “Elisabeth, Descartes, et la psychologie morale du regret” in Élisabeth de Bohème face à Descartes: Deux Philosophes, M.-F. Pellegrin and D. Kolesnik (eds.), Paris: Vrin. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The Union of Mind and Body and the Practice of Philosophy,”British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7(3): 503–20. (Scholar)
  • Tollefson, Deborah, 1999, “Princess Elisabeth and the Problem of Mind-Body Interaction,” Hypatia, 14(3): 59–77. (Scholar)
  • Wartenburg, Thomas, 1999, “Descartes’s Mood: The Question of Feminism in the Correspondence with Elisabeth” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wilson, Margaret, 1978, Descartes, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Yandell, David, 1997, “What Descartes Really Told Elisabeth: Mind-Body Union as a Primitive Notion,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 5(2): 249–73. (Scholar)
  • Zendler, Beatrice, 1989, “The Three Princesses,” Hypatia, 4(1): 28–63. (Scholar)

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