Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Computer and Information Ethics" by Terrell Bynum

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Adam, A. (2000), “Gender and Computer Ethics,” Computers and Society, 30(4): 17–24. (Scholar)
  • Adam, A. and J. Ofori-Amanfo (2000), “Does Gender Matter in Computer Ethics?Ethics and Information Technology, 2(1): 37–47. (Scholar)
  • Anderson, R, D. Johnson, D. Gotterbarn and J. Perrolle (1993), “Using the New ACM Code of Ethics in Decision Making,” Communications of the ACM, 36: 98–107. (Scholar)
  • Bohman, James (2008), “The Transformation of the Public Sphere: Political Authority, Communicative Freedom, and Internet Publics,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 66–92. (Scholar)
  • Brennan, G. and P. Pettit (2008), “Esteem, Identifiability, and the Internet,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 175–94. (Scholar)
  • Brey, P. (2001), “Disclosive Computer Ethics,” in R. Spinello and H. Tavani (eds.), Readings in CyberEthics, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006a), “Evaluating the Social and Cultural Implications of the Internet,” Computers and Society, 36(3): 41–44. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006b), “Social and Ethical Dimensions of Computer-Mediated Education,” Journal of Information, Communication & Ethics in Society, 4(2): 91–102. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “Do We Have Moral Duties Toward Information Objects,” Ethics and Information Technology, 10(2–3): 109–114. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2012), “Anticipatory Ethics for Emerging Technologies,” Nanoethics, 6(1): 1–13. (Scholar)
  • ––– (eds.) (2012), The Good Life in a Technological Age, New York, NY: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Bynum, T. (1982), “A Discipline in its Infancy,” The Dallas Morning News, January 12, 1982, D/1, D/6. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1999), “The Development of Computer Ethics as a Philosophical Field of Study,” The Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics, 1(1): 1–29. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2000), “The Foundation of Computer Ethics,” Computers and Society, 30(2): 6–13. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “Ethical Challenges to Citizens of the ‘Automatic Age’: Norbert Wiener on the Information Society,” Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 2(2): 65–74. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005), “Norbert Wiener’s Vision: the Impact of the ‘Automatic Age’ on our Moral Lives,” in R. Cavalier (ed.), The Impact of the Internet on our Moral Lives, Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 11–25. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006), “Flourishing Ethics,” Ethics and Information Technology, 8(4): 157–173. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008a), “Milestones in the History of Information and Computer Ethics,” in K. Himma and H. Tavani (eds.), The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, New York: John Wiley, 25–48. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008b), “Norbert Wiener and the Rise of Information Ethics,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 8–25. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008c), “A Copernican Revolution in Ethics?,” in G. Crnkovic and S. Stuart (eds.), Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 302–329. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2010a), “Historical Roots of Information Ethics,” in L. Floridi (ed.), Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 20–38. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2010b), “Philosophy in the Information Age,” in P. Allo (ed.), Luciano Floridi and the Philosophy of Information, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 420–442. (Scholar)
  • Bynum, T. and P. Schubert (1997), “How to do Computer Ethics – A Case Study: The Electronic Mall Bodensee,” in J. van den Hoven (ed.), Computer Ethics – Philosophical Enquiry, Rotterdam: Erasmus University Press, 85–95. (Scholar)
  • Capurro, R. (2007a), “Information Ethics for and from Africa,” International Review of Information Ethics, 2007: 3–13. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2007b), “Intercultural Information Ethics,” in R. Capurro, J. Frühbauer and T. Hausmanninger (eds.), Localizing the Internet: Ethical Issues in Intercultural Perspective, (ICIE Series, Volume 4), Munich: Fink, 2007: 21–38. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006), “Towards an Ontological Foundation for Information Ethics,” Ethics and Information Technology, 8(4): 157–186. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “The German Debate on the Information Society,” The Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 2 (Supplement): 17–18. (Scholar)
  • Capurro, R. and J. Britz (2010), “In Search of a Code of Global Information Ethics: The Road Travelled and New Horizons, ” Ethical Space, 7(2/3): 28–36. (Scholar)
  • Capurro, R. and M. Nagenborg (eds.) (2009) Ethics and Robotics, Heidelberg: Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, IOS Press. (Scholar)
  • Cavalier, R. (ed.) (2005), The Impact of the Internet on Our Moral Lives, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • Cocking, D. (2008), “Plural Selves and Relational Identity: Intimacy and Privacy Online,” In J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 123–41. (Scholar)
  • de Laat, P., (2010), “How Can Contributions to Open-Source Communities be Trusted?,” Ethics and Information Technology, 12(4): 327–341. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2012), “Coercion or Empowerment? Moderation of Content in Wikipedia as Essentially Contested Bureaucratic Rules,” Ethics and Information Technology, 14(2): 123–135. (Scholar)
  • Edgar, S. (1997), Morality and Machines: Perspectives on Computer Ethics, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. (Scholar)
  • Elgesem, D. (1995), “Data Privacy and Legal Argumentation,” Communication and Cognition, 28(1): 91–114. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1996), “Privacy, Respect for Persons, and Risk,” in C. Ess (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Computer-Mediated Communication, Albany: SUNY Press, 45–66. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2002), “What is Special about the Ethical Problems in Internet Research?” Ethics and Information Technology, 4(3): 195–203. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “Information Technology Research Ethics,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 354–75. (Scholar)
  • Ess, C. (1996), “The Political Computer: Democracy, CMC, and Habermas,” in C. Ess (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Computer-Mediated Communication, Albany: SUNY Press, 197–230. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.) (2001a), Culture, Technology, Communication: Towards an Intercultural Global Village, Albany: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2001b), “What’s Culture got to do with it? Cultural Collisions in the Electronic Global Village,” in C. Ess (ed.), Culture, Technology, Communication: Towards an Intercultural Global Village, Albany: SUNY Press, 1–50. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “Computer-Mediated Communication and Human-Computer Interaction,” in L. Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information, Oxford: Blackwell, 76–91. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005), “Moral Imperatives for Life in an Intercultural Global Village, ” in R. Cavalier (ed.), The Impact of the Internet on our Moral Lives, Albany: SUNY Press, 161–193. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “Culture and Global Networks: Hope for a Global Ethics?” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 195–225. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2013), “Global? Media Ethics: Issues, Challenges, Requirements, Resolutions” in S. Ward (ed.), Global Media Ethics: Problems and Perspectives, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 253–271. (Scholar)
  • Fairweather, B. (1998), “No PAPA: Why Incomplete Codes of Ethics are Worse than None at all,” in G. Collste (ed.), Ethics and Information Technology, New Delhi: New Academic Publishers. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2011), “Even Greener IT: Bringing Green Theory and Green IT Together,” Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 9(2): 68–82. (Scholar)
  • Flanagan, M., D. Howe, and H. Nissenbaum (2008), “Embodying Value in Technology: Theory and Practice,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 322–53. (Scholar)
  • Flanagan, M. and H. Nissenbaum (2014), Values at Play in Digital Games, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Floridi, L. (1999), “Information Ethics: On the Theoretical Foundations of Computer Ethics”, Ethics and Information Technology, 1(1): 37–56. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.) (2004), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information, Oxford: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005b), “Internet Ethics: The Constructionist Values of Homo Poieticus,” in R. Cavalier (ed.), The Impact of the Internet on our Moral Lives, Albany: SUNY Press, 195–214. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006a), “Information Ethics: Its Nature and Scope,” Computers and Society, 36(3): 21–36. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006b), “Information Technologies and the Tragedy of the Good Will,” Ethics and Information Technology, 8(4): 253–262. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “Information Ethics: Its Nature and Scope,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 40–65. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.) (2010), Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2011), The Philosophy of Information, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2013a), “Distributed Morality in an Information Society,” Science and Engineering Ethics, 19(3): 727–743. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2013b), The Ethics of Information, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2014), The Fourth Revolution - How the Infosphere is Reshaping Human Reality, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Floridi, L. and J. Sanders (2004), “The Foundationalist Debate in Computer Ethics,” in R. Spinello and H. Tavani (eds.), Readings in CyberEthics, 2nd edition, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett, 81–95. (Scholar)
  • Forester, T. and P. Morrison (1990), Computer Ethics: Cautionary Tales and Ethical Dilemmas in Computing, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Fried, C. (1984), “Privacy,” in F. Schoeman (ed.), Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Friedman, B. (ed.) (1997), Human Values and the Design of Computer Technology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Friedman, B. and H. Nissenbaum (1996), “Bias in Computer Systems,” ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 14(3): 330–347. (Scholar)
  • Gerdes, A. (2013), “Ethical Issues in Human Robot Interaction,” in H. Nykänen, O. Riis, and J. Zelle (eds.), Theoretical and Applied Ethics, Aalborg, Denmark: Aalborg University Press, 125–143. (Scholar)
  • Gert, B. (1999), “Common Morality and Computing,” Ethics and Information Technology, 1(1): 57–64. (Scholar)
  • Goldman, A. (2008), “The Social Epistemology of Blogging,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 111–22. (Scholar)
  • Gordon, W. (2008), “Moral Philosophy, Information Technology, and Copyright: The Grokster Case,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 270–300. (Scholar)
  • Gorniak-Kocikowska, K. (1996), “The Computer Revolution and the Problem of Global Ethics,” in T. Bynum and S. Rogerson (eds.), Global Information Ethics, Guildford, UK: Opragen Publications, 177–90. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005) “From Computer Ethics to the Ethics of the Global ICT Society,” in T. Bynum, G. Collste, and S. Rogerson (eds.), Proceedings of ETHICOMP2005 (CD-ROM), Center for Computing and Social Responsibility, Linköpings University. Also in Library Hi Tech, 25(1): 47–57. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2007), “ICT, Globalization and the Pursuit of Happiness: The Problem of Change,” in Proceedings of ETHICOMP2007, Tokyo: Meiji University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “ICT and the Tension between Old and New: The Human Factor,” Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 6(1): 4–27. (Scholar)
  • Gotterbarn, D. (1991), “Computer Ethics: Responsibility Regained,” National Forum: The Phi Beta Kappa Journal, 71: 26–31. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2001), “Informatics and Professional Responsibility,” Science and Engineering Ethics, 7(2): 221–30. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2002) “Reducing Software Failures: Addressing the Ethical Risks of the Software Development Life Cycle,” Australian Journal of Information Systems, 9(2): 155–65. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008) “Once More unto the Breach: Professional Responsibility and Computer Ethics,” Science and Engineering Ethics, 14(1): 235–239. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2009) “The Public is the Priority: Making Decisions Using the SE Code of Ethics,” IEEE Computer, June: 42–49. (Scholar)
  • Gotterbarn, D., K. Miller, and S. Rogerson (1997), “Software Engineering Code of Ethics,” Information Society, 40(11): 110–118. (Scholar)
  • Gotterbarn, D. and K. Miller (2004), “Computer Ethics in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Case Studies and the Joint Software Engineer’s Code,” Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 20(2): 156–167. (Scholar)
  • Gotterbarn, D. and S. Rogerson (2005), “Responsible Risk Analysis for Software Development: Creating the Software Development Impact Statement,” Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 15(40): 730–50. (Scholar)
  • Grodzinsky, F. (1997), “Computer Access for Students with Disabilities,” SIGSCE Bulletin, 29(1): 292–295; [Available online]. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1999), “The Practitioner from Within: Revisiting the Virtues,” Computers and Society, 29(2): 9–15. (Scholar)
  • Grodzinsky, F., A. Gumbus and S. Lilley (2010), “Ethical Implications of Internet Monitoring: A Comparative Study,” Information System Frontiers, 12(4):433–431. (Scholar)
  • Grodzinsky, F., K. Miller and M. Wolf (2003), “Ethical Issues in Open Source Software,” Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 1(4): 193–205. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008), “The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents,” Ethics and Information Technology, 10(2–3): 115–121. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2011), “Developing Artificial Agents Worthy of Trust,” Ethics and Information Technology, 13(1): 17–27. (Scholar)
  • Grodzinsky, F. and H. Tavani (2002), “Ethical Reflections on Cyberstalking,” Computers and Society, 32(1): 22–32. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “Verizon vs. the RIAA: Implications for Privacy and Democracy,” in J. Herkert (ed.), Proceedings of ISTAS 2004: The International Symposium on Technology and Society, Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2010), “Applying the Contextual Integrity Model of Privacy to Personal Blogs in the Blogosphere,” International Journal of Internet Research Ethics, 3(1): 38–47. (Scholar)
  • Grodzinsky, F. and M. Wolf (2008), “Ethical Issues in Free and Open Source Software,” in K. Himma and H. Tavani (eds.), The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 245–272. (Scholar)
  • Himma, K. (2003), “The Relationship Between the Uniqueness of Computer Ethics and its Independence as a Discipline in Applied Ethics,” Ethics and Information Technology, 5(4): 225–237. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “The Moral Significance of the Interest in Information: Reflections on a Fundamental Right to Information,” Journal of Information, Communication, and Ethics in Society, 2(4): 191–202. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2007), “Artificial Agency, Consciousness, and the Criteria for Moral Agency: What Properties Must an Artificial Agent Have to be a Moral Agent?” in Proceedings of ETHICOMP2007, Tokyo: Meiji University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “There’s Something about Mary: The Moral Value of Things qua Information Objects”, Ethics and Information Technology, 6(3): 145–159. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006), “Hacking as Politically Motivated Civil Disobedience: Is Hacktivism Morally Justified?” in K. Himma (ed.), Readings in Internet Security: Hacking, Counterhacking, and Society, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. (Scholar)
  • Himma, K. and H. Tavani (eds.) (2008), The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. (Scholar)
  • Hongladarom, S. (2011), “Personal Identity and the Self in the Online and Offline Worlds,” Minds and Machines, 21(4): 533–548. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2013), “Ubiquitous Computing, Empathy and the Self,” AI and Society, 28(2): 227–236. (Scholar)
  • Huff, C. and T. Finholt (eds.) (1994), Social Issues in Computing: Putting Computers in Their Place, New York: McGraw-Hill. (Scholar)
  • Huff, C. and D. Martin (1995), “Computing Consequences: A Framework for Teaching Ethical Computing,” Communications of the ACM, 38(12): 75–84. (Scholar)
  • Huff, C. (2002), “Gender, Software Design, and Occupational Equity,” SIGCSE Bulletin: Inroads, 34: 112–115. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “Unintentional Power in the Design of Computing Systems.” in T. Bynum and S. Rogerson (eds.), Computer Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Oxford: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Huff, C., D. Johnson, and K. Miller (2003), “Virtual Harms and Real Responsibility,” Technology and Society Magazine (IEEE), 22(2): 12–19. (Scholar)
  • Huff, C. and L. Barnard (2009), “Good Computing: Life Stories of Moral Exemplars in the Computing Profession,” IEEE Technology and Society, 28(3): 47–54. (Scholar)
  • Introna, L. (1997), “Privacy and the Computer: Why We Need Privacy in the Information Society,” Metaphilosophy, 28(3): 259–275. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2002), “On the (Im)Possibility of Ethics in a Mediated World,” Information and Organization, 12(2): 71–84. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005a), “Disclosive Ethics and Information Technology: Disclosing Facial Recognition Systems,” Ethics and Information Technology, 7(2): 75–86. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005b) “Phenomenological Approaches to Ethics and Information Technology,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2005/entries/ethics-it-phenomenology/>. (Scholar)
  • Introna, L. and H. Nissenbaum (2000), “Shaping the Web: Why the Politics of Search Engines Matters,” The Information Society, 16(3): 1–17. (Scholar)
  • Introna, L. and N. Pouloudi (2001), “Privacy in the Information Age: Stakeholders, Interests and Values.” in J. Sheth (ed.), Internet Marketing, Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt College Publishers, 373–388. (Scholar)
  • Johnson, D. (1985), Computer Ethics, First Edition, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; Second Edition, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1994; Third Edition Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2001; Fourth Edition (with Keith Miller), New York: Pearson, 2009. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1997a), “Ethics Online,” Communications of the ACM, 40(1): 60–65. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1997b), “Is the Global Information Infrastructure a Democratic Technology?Computers and Society, 27(4): 20–26. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2004), “Computer Ethics,” in L. Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information, Oxford: Blackwell, 65–75. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2011), “Software Agents, Anticipatory Ethics, and Accountability,” in G. Merchant, B. Allenby, and J. Herkert, (eds.), The Growing Gap Between Emerging Technologies and Legal-Ethical Oversight: The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology, 7: 61–76. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Johnson, D. and H. Nissenbaum (eds.) (1995), Computing, Ethics & Social Values, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. (Scholar)
  • Johnson, D. and T. Powers (2008), “Computers as Surrogate Agents,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert, (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 251–69. (Scholar)
  • Kocikowski, A. (1996), “Geography and Computer Ethics: An Eastern European Perspective,” in T. Bynum and S. Rogerson (eds.), Science and Engineering Ethics (Special Issue: Global Information Ethics), 2(2): 201–10. (Scholar)
  • Lane, J., V. Stodden, S. Bender, and H. Nissenbaum (eds.) (2014), Privacy, Big Data and the Public Good, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lessig, L. (2004), “The Laws of Cyberspace,” in R. Spinello and H. Tavani (eds.), Readings in CyberEthics, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett, Second Edition, 134–144. (Scholar)
  • Lloyd, S. (2006), Programming the Universe, New York: Alfred A. Knopf Publishers. (Scholar)
  • Maner, W. (1980), Starter Kit in Computer Ethics, Hyde Park, NY: Helvetia Press and the National Information and Resource Center for Teaching Philosophy. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1996), “Unique Ethical Problems in Information Technology,” in T. Bynum and S. Rogerson (eds.), Science and Engineering Ethics (Special Issue: Global Information Ethics), 2(2): 137–154. (Scholar)
  • Martin, C. and D. Martin (1990), “Professional Codes of Conduct and Computer Ethics Education,” Social Science Computer Review, 8(1): 96–108. (Scholar)
  • Martin, C., C. Huff, D. Gotterbarn, K. Miller, et al. (1996), “A Framework for Implementing and Teaching the Social and Ethical Impact of Computing,” Education and Information Technologies, 1(2): 101–122. (Scholar)
  • Martin, C., C. Huff, D. Gotterbarn, and K. Miller (1996), “Implementing a Tenth Strand in the Computer Science Curriculum” (Second Report of the Impact CS Steering Committee), Communications of the ACM, 39(12): 75–84. (Scholar)
  • Marx, G. (2001), “Identity and Anonymity: Some Conceptual Distinctions and Issues for Research,” in J. Caplan and J. Torpey (eds.), Documenting Individual Identity, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mather, K. (2005), “The Theoretical Foundation of Computer Ethics: Stewardship of the Information Environment,” in Contemporary Issues in Governance (Proceedings of GovNet Annual Conference, Melbourne, Australia, 28–30 November, 2005), Melbourne: Monash University. (Scholar)
  • Matthews, S. (2008), “Identity and Information Technology.” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 142–60. (Scholar)
  • Miller, K. (2005), “Web standards: Why So Many Stray from the Narrow Path,” Science and Engineering Ethics, 11(3): 477–479. (Scholar)
  • Miller, K. and D. Larson (2005a), “Agile Methods and Computer Ethics: Raising the Level of Discourse about Technological Choices,” IEEE Technology and Society, 24(4): 36–43. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005b), “Angels and Artifacts: Moral Agents in the Age of Computers and Networks,” Journal of Information, Communication & Ethics in Society, 3(3): 151–157. (Scholar)
  • Miller, S. (2008), “Collective Responsibility and Information and Communication Technology.” in J. van den Hoven and J> Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 226–50. (Scholar)
  • Moor, J. (1979), “Are there Decisions Computers Should Never Make?” Nature and System, 1: 217–29. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1985) “What Is Computer Ethics?Metaphilosophy, 16(4): 266–75. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1996), “Reason, Relativity and Responsibility in Computer Ethics,” in Computers and Society, 28(1) (1998): 14–21; originally a keynote address at ETHICOMP96 in Madrid, Spain, 1996. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1997), “Towards a Theory of Privacy in the Information Age,” Computers and Society, 27(3): 27–32. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1999), “Just Consequentialism and Computing,” Ethics and Information Technology, 1(1): 65–69. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2001), “The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet,” Ethics and Information Technology, 3(2): 89–91. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005), “Should We Let Computers Get under Our Skin?” in R. Cavalier, The Impact of the Internet on our Moral Lives, Albany: SUNY Press, 121–138. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2006), “The Nature, Importance, and Difficulty of Machine Ethics,” IEEE Intelligent Systems, 21(4): 18–21. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2007), “Taking the Intentional Stance Toward Robot Ethics,” American Philosophical Association Newsletters, 6(2): 111–119. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2008) “Why We Need Better Ethics for Emerging Technologies,” in J. van den Hoven and J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 26–39. (Scholar)
  • Murata, K. and Y. Orito (2010), “Japanese Risk Society: Trying to Create Complete Security and Safety Using Information and Communication Technology”, Computers and Society, ACM SIGCAS 40(3): 38–49. (Scholar)
  • Murata, K., Y. Orito and Y. Fukuta (2014), “Social Attitudes of Young People in Japan Towards Online Privacy”, Journal of Law, Information and Science, 23(1): 137–157. (Scholar)
  • Nissenbaum, H. (1995), “Should I Copy My Neighbor’s Software?” in D. Johnson and H. Nissenbaum (eds), Computers, Ethics, and Social Responsibility, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1997), “Can We Protect Privacy in Public?” in Proceedings of Computer Ethics – Philosophical Enquiry 97 (CEPE97), Rotterdam: Erasmus University Press, 191–204; reprinted Nissenbaum 1998a. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1998a), “Protecting Privacy in an Information Age: The Problem of Privacy in Public,” Law and Philosophy, 17: 559–596. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1998b), “Values in the Design of Computer Systems,” Computers in Society, 1998: 38–39. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1999), “The Meaning of Anonymity in an Information Age,” The Information Society, 15: 141–144. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005a), “Hackers and the Contested Ontology of Cyberspace,” in R. Cavalier (ed.), The Impact of the Internet on our Moral Lives, Albany: SUNY Press, 139–160. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2005b), “Where Computer Security Meets National Security,” Ethics and Information Technology, 7(2): 61–73. (Scholar)
  • ––– (2011), “A Contextual Approach to Privacy Online,” Daedalus, 140(4): 32–48. (Scholar)
  • Ocholla, D, J. Britz, R. Capurro, and C. Bester, (eds.) (2013), Information Ethics in Africa: Cross-Cutting Themes, African Center of Excellence for Information Ethics, Pretoria, South Africa. (Scholar)
  • Orito, Y. (2011), “The Counter-Control Revolution: Silent Control of Individuals Through Dataveillance Systems,” Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 9(1): 5–19. (Scholar)
  • Parker, D. (1968), “Rules of Ethics in Information Processing,” Communications of the ACM, 11: 198–201. (Scholar)
  • ––– (1979), Ethical Conflicts in Computer Science and Technology. Arlington, VA: AFIPS Press. (Scholar)
  • Parker, D., S. Swope and B. Baker (1990), Ethical Conflicts in Information & Computer Science, Technology & Business, Wellesley, MA: QED Information Sciences. (Scholar)
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