Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Feminist Perspectives on Class and Work" by Ann Ferguson, Rosemary Hennessy and Mechthild Nagel

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  • Eisenstein, Zillah (ed.), 1979, Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, New York: Monthly Review. (Scholar)
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  • –––, 2004, Caliban and the Witch: Women, the Body and Primitive Accumulation, Brooklyn, NY: Autonomedia. (Scholar)
  • Ferguson, Ann, 1979, “Women as a New Revolutionary Class in the US”, in Walker (ed.) 1979, pp. 279–309. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989, Blood at the Root: Motherhood, Sexuality and Male Domination, New York: Pandora/Unwin and Hyman. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution, Boulder CO: Westview Press. (Scholar)
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  • –––, 2004. “A Feminist Analysis of the Care Crisis”, in Fina Birulés and Maria Isabel Peña Aguado (eds.), La Passió per la Libertat/A Passion for Freedom, The Proceedings of the International Women’s Philosophy Association (IAPh) conference, October 1–5, 2002, Barcelona, Spain: Universitat de Barcelona. (Scholar)
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  • –––, 2000. “Women, Care and the Public Good: A Dialogue”, in Anatole Anton, Milton Fisk and Nancy Holmstrom (eds.),Not for Sale: In Defense of Public Goods, Boulder CO: Westview Press, pp. 95–108. (Scholar)
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  • –––, 1993, “Socialism: Feminist or Scientific?” in M. Ferber and Julie Nelson (eds.), Beyond Economic Man, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994, Who Pays for the Kids? Gender and the Structures of Constraint, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000, The Invisible Heart: Economics and Family Values, New York: The New Press. (Scholar)
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