Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Feminist Philosophy of Law" by Leslie Francis and Patricia Smith

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Abrams, K. and H. Keren, 2010. “Law and Emotion,” Minnesota Law Review, 94: 1997–2074. (Scholar)
  • Ackerly, B.A., 2008. Universal Human Rights in a World of Difference, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Allen, A., 2011. Unpopular Privacy: What must we hide?, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005 After Privacy: A Feminist Analysis of Preferential Regulation in the Liberal State, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Appleton, S.F., 2011. “Reproduction and Regret,” Yale Journal of Law & Feminism, 23: 255–333. (Scholar)
  • Bartlett, K., 1990. “Feminist Legal Methods,” Harvard Law Review, 1039(4): 829–888. (Scholar)
  • Bartlett, K. and R. Kennedy (eds.), 1991. Feminist Legal Theory, Boulder: Westview Press. (Scholar)
  • Bracewell, L. N., 2016. “Beyond Barnard: Liberalism, Antipornography Feminism, and the Sex Wars,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 42: 23–48. (Scholar)
  • Brake, E., 2014. Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cahill, A.J., 2016. “Unjust Sex vs. Rape,” Hypatia, 31: 746–761. (Scholar)
  • Campo-Engelstein, L., 2016. “Rape as a Hate Crime: An Analysis of New York Law ,” Hypatia, 31: 91–106. (Scholar)
  • Carr, M, with M. Chen, and R. Jhabvala (eds.), 1996. Speaking Out: Women’s Economic Empowerment in South Asia, London: IT Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Case, M.A., 2014. “The Ladies? Forget About Them. A Feminist Perspective on the Limits of Originalism,” Constitutional Commentary, 29: 431–456. (Scholar)
  • Chamallas, M., 2010. “Who is the Reasonable Person? Gaining Some Perspective in Tort Law: A New Take on Third Party Criminal Attack Cases,” Lewis & Clark Law Review, 14: 1351–1400. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003. Introduction to Feminist Legal Theory, 2d edition, Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Law & Business. (Scholar)
  • Chamallas, M. and J. Wriggins, 2010. The Measure of Injury: Race, Gender, and Tort Law, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • Chen, M.A., 2011. “Recognizing Domestic Workers, Regulating Domestic Work: Conceptual, Measurement, and Regulatory Challenges,” Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, 23(1): 167–184. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995. “A Matter of Survival: Women’s Right to Employment in India and Bangladesh,” in M. Nussbaum and J. Glover (eds.) 1995, pp. 37–60. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983. A Quiet Revolution: Women in Transition in Rural Bangladesh, Cambridge, MA: Schenkman Publishing Co. (Scholar)
  • Cornell, D., 1995. The Imaginary Domain, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Crenshaw, K., 2012. “From Private Violence to Mass Incarceration: Thinking Intersectionally About Women, Race, and Social Control,” UCLA Law Review, 59: 1418–1472. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex,” University of Chicago Legal Forum, 1989: 139–167; reprinted in D. Kairys (ed.), The Politics of Law: A Progressive Critique, 2nd edition, Pantheon, 1990, 195–217. (Scholar)
  • Crenshaw, K., with N. Gotanda, G. Peller and K. Thomas (eds.), 1996. Critical Race Theory: Key Writing that Formed the Movement, New York: New Press. (Scholar)
  • Cuevas, J.-J., and T. Jacobi, 2016. “The Hidden Psychology of Constitutional Criminal Procedure,” Cardozo Law Review, 37: 2161–2237. (Scholar)
  • Danaher, J., 2017. “Robotic Rape and Robotic Child Sexual Abuse: Should They Be Criminalised?,” Criminal Law and Philosophy, 11: 71–95. (Scholar)
  • De Melo-Martin, I., 2016. Rethinking Reprogenetics: Enhancing Ethical Analyses of Reprogenetic Technologies, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Dempsey, M.M., 2010. “Sex Trafficking and Criminalization: In Defense of Feminist Abolitionism,” University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 158: 1729–1778.  (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009. Prosecuting Domestic Violence, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Dickenson, D., 2007. Property in the Body: Feminist Perspectives, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Dotson, K., 2011. “Tracking Epistemic Violence, Tracking Patterns of Silencing,” Hypatia, 26: 236–257. (Scholar)
  • Dreze, J. and A. Sen, 1989. Hunger and Public Action, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Engle, K., 2005. “International Human Rights and Feminisms: When Discourses Keep Meeting,” Ch. 3 in D. Buss and A. Manji (eds.), International Law: Modern Feminist Approaches, Oxford and Portland: Hart Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Ertman, M., 2001. “Marriage as a Trade: Bridging the Public-Private Distinction,” Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, 36: 79–132. (Scholar)
  • Estrich, S., 2001. Sex & Power, New York: Riverhead Books. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987. Real Rape, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fineman, M., 2004. The Autonomy Myth, New York: The New Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995. The Neutered Mother, the Sexual Family, and Other 20th Century Tragedies, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Fineman, M. and T. Dougherty (eds.), 2005. Feminism Confronts Homo Economicus, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fitz-Gibbon, K., and J. Maher, 2015. “Feminist Challenges to the Constraints of Law: Donning Uncomfortable Robes?,” Feminist Legal Studies, 23: 253–271. (Scholar)
  • Francis, L.P. (ed.), 2017. The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Freedman, J., 2008. “Women’s Right to Asylum: Protecting the Rights of Female Asylum Seekers in Europe?,” Human Rights Review, 9: 423–433. (Scholar)
  • Fricker, M., 2007. Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Frug, M.J., 1992. “Sexual Equality and Sexual Difference in American Law,” New England Law Review, 26: 665–682. (Scholar)
  • Funk, N. and M. Mueller (eds.), 1993. Gender Politics & Post-Communism, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Gilson, E., 2016. “The Perils and Privileges of Vulnerability: Intersectionality, Relationality, and the Injustices of the U.S. Prison Nation,” philoSOPHIA, 6: 43–59. (Scholar)
  • Goldin, C. and C. Rouse, 2000. “Orchestrating Impartiality: The Impact of ‘Blind’ Auditions on Female Musicians,” American Economic Review, 90(4): 715–741. (Scholar)
  • Gould, C., 2003. “Women’s Human Rights & the U.S. Constitution,” in S. Schwarwenbach and P. Smith (eds.), Women and the United States Constitution, New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 197–219. (Scholar)
  • Grebowicz, M., 2015. Why Internet Porn Matters, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Greenhouse, L. and R. Siegel (eds.), 2010. Before Roe v. Wade: Voices that Shaped the Abortion Debate before the Supreme Court’s Ruling, New York: Kaplan Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Halley, J. with P. Kotiswaran, H. Shamir, and C. Thomas C., 2006. “From the International to the Local in Feminist Responses to Rape, Prostitution/Sex Work, and Sex Trafficking:  Four Studies in Contemporary Governance Feminism,” Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, 29: 335–423. (Scholar)
  • Harris, A., 1990. “Race and Essentialism in Feminist Legal Theory,” Stanford Law Review, 42(3): 581–616. (Scholar)
  • Hathaway, O., 2005. “Between Power and Principle: A Political Theory of International Law,” University of Chicago Law Review, 71: 469–536. (Scholar)
  • Haslanger, S., 2012. Resisting Reality, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hassan, Y., 1998. The Haven Becomes Hell: A Study of Domestic Violence in Pakistan, Lahore, Pakistan: Shirhat Gah. (Scholar)
  • Heyes, C., 2016. “Dead to the World: Rape, Unconsciousness, and Social Media,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 41: 361–383. (Scholar)
  • Husseini, R., 2007. Murder in the Name of Honor, Oxford: Oneworld Publishers. (Scholar)
  • International Women’s Rights Action Watch–Asia Pacific (IWRAW-AP), 2012. “The Principle of Equality,” linked into the page CEDAW Principles. (Scholar)
  • Jain, D., 2005. Women, Development & the United Nations, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Jeffry, P. and A. Basu (eds.), 1998. Appropriating Gender: Women’s Activism & Politicized Religion in South Asia, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Jones, K., 2014. “Intersectionality and Ameliorative Analyses of Race and Gender,” Philosophical Studies , 171: 99–107. (Scholar)
  • Kellerman, B. and D. Rhode (eds.), 2007. Women and Leadership, New York: Jossey-Bass Pub. (Scholar)
  • Kim, S.A., 2010. “Marital Naming/Naming Marriage: Language and Status in Family Law,” Indiana Law Journal , 85: 893–953. (Scholar)
  • Laufer-Ukeles, P., 2011. “Reproductive Choices and Informed Consent: Fetal Interests, Women’s Identity, and Relational Autonomy,” American Journal of Law & Medicine, 37: 567–623. (Scholar)
  • Li, X., 1995. “Gender Inequality in China & Cultural Relativism,” in M. Nussbaum and J. Glover (eds.) 1995, pp. 407–425. (Scholar)
  • McGregor, J., 2005. Is it Rape? On Acquaintance Rape and Taking Women’s Consent Seriously, London: Ashgate. (Scholar)
  • MacKinnon, C., 2006. Are Women Human?, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. Toward a Feminist Theory of the State, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1979. Sexual Harassment of Working Women, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • MacKinnon, C. and R. Siegel (eds.), 2004. Directions in Sexual Harassment, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Manderson, L., 2003. Violence Against Women in Asian Societies, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Matsuda, M., 1987. “Looking to the Bottom: CLS and Reparations,” Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, 22(2): 374–380. (Scholar)
  • Mayeri, S., 2011. Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • McClain, L.C., 2006. The Place of Families: Fostering Capacity, Equality and Responsibility, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • McKinnon, R., 2016. “Epistemic Injustice,” Philosophy Compass, 11: 437–446. (Scholar)
  • Medina, J., 2013. The Epistemology of Ignorance: Gender and Racial Oppression, Epistemic Injustice, and Resistant Imaginations, Oxford, Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Minow, M., 1991. Making All the Difference: Inclusion, Exclusion & American Law, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mir-Hosseini, Z., 2006. “Muslim Women’s Quest for Equality: Between Islamic Law and Feminism,” Critical Inquiry, 32: 629–645. (Scholar)
  • Miriam, K., 2005. “Stopping the Traffic in Women: Power, Agency and Abolition in Feminist Debates over Sex-Trafficking,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 36: 1–17. (Scholar)
  • Mirza, Q. (ed.), 2006. Islamic Feminism & the Law, London: Routledge Cavendish. (Scholar)
  • Mookherjee, M., 2009. Women’s Rights as Multicultural Claims: Reconfiguring Gender and Diversity in Political Philosophy, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. (Scholar)
  • Nourse, V. and G. Shaffer, 2009. “Varieties of New Legal Realism:  Can a New World Order Prompt a New Legal Theory?,” Cornell Law Review, 95: 61–137. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, M., 2006. Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, M. and J. Glover (eds.), 1995. Women, Culture & Development, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Okin, S., 1995. “Inequality Between the Sexes in Different Cultural Contexts,” in M. Nussbaum and J. Glover (eds.) 1995, pp. 274–297. (Scholar)
  • Olsen, F. (ed.), 1995. Feminist Legal Theory, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993. “Unraveling Compromise,” in P. Smith (ed.) 1993, pp. 335–353. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983. “The Family & the Market,” Harvard Law Review, 96: 1497–1578. (Scholar)
  • Otto, D., 2005. “Disconcerting ‘Masculinities’: Reinventing the Gendered Subject(s) of International Human Rights Law,” Ch. 6 in D. Buss and A. Manji (eds.), International Law: Modern Feminist Approaches, Oxford and Portland, OR: Hart Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Parekh, S., 2012. “Does Ordinary Injustice Make Extraordinary Injustice Possible? Gender, Structural Injustice, and the Ethics of Refugee Determination,” Journal of Global Ethics, 8 : 269–281. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011. “ Getting to the Root of Gender Inequality: Structural Injustice and Political ResponsibilityHypatia, 26 :672–689. (Scholar)
  • Peach, L., 2002. Religious Lawmaking in a Secular State, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pearce, D., 1978. “The Feminization of Poverty: Women, Work, and Welfare,” Urban and Social Change Review, 11: 28–36. (Scholar)
  • Peters, J. and A. Wolper (eds.), 1995. Women’s Rights, Human Rights, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Petrova, D., 1993. “The Winding Road to Emancipation in Bulgaria,” in N. Funk and M. Mueller (eds.) 1993, pp. 22–29. (Scholar)
  • Quraishi, A., 2011. “What if Sharia weren’t the Enemy?: Rethinking International Women’s Rights Advocacy on Islamic Law,” Columbia Journal of Gender and the Law, 22: 173–249. (Scholar)
  • Radin, M.J., 1996. Contested Commodities: The Trouble with Trade in Sex, Children, Body Parts, and Other Things, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Rainey, S. S., 2017. “In Sicness and in Health: Cripping and Queering Marriage Equality.” Hypatia,32: 230–246. (Scholar)
  • Reed, B. and K. Pollitt (eds.), 2002. Nothing Sacred: Women Respond to Religious Fundamentalism, New York: Nation Books. (Scholar)
  • Rhode, D., 1997. Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. Justice and Gender, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Rhode, D. and C. Sanger (eds.), 2005. Gender and Rights, New York: International Library of Essays on Rights. (Scholar)
  • Roberts, D., 2002. Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare, New York: Basic Books. (Scholar)
  • Robson, R.A., 2002. “Assimilation, Marriage, & Lesbian Liberation,” Temple Law Review, 75: 709–820. (Scholar)
  • Scales, A., 2006. Legal Feminism:  Activism, Lawyering and Legal Theory, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1986. “The Emergence of Feminist Jurisprudence: An Essay,” Yale Law Journal, 95: 1373–1403. (Scholar)
  • Schneider, E., 2000. Battered Women & Feminist Lawmaking, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004. “Transnational Law as a Domestic Resource,” New England Law Review, 38: 689–724. (Scholar)
  • Schroeder, J., 1991. “Feminist Methodologies and the Logic of Imagination,” Texas Law Review, 70: 109–210. (Scholar)
  • Schulhofer, S., 1998. Unwanted Sex: The Culture of Intimidation & the Failure of Law, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Schultz, V., 2003. “The Sanitized Workplace,” Yale Law Journal, 112: 2061–2193. (Scholar)
  • Schwarzenbach, S. and P. Smith (eds.), 2003. Women & the United States Constitution, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sen, A., 1995. “Gender Inequality & Theories of Justice,” in M. Nussbaum and J. Glover (eds.) 1995, pp. 259–273. (Scholar)
  • Smith, P., 2005. “Four Themes in Feminist Legal Theory: Difference, Dominance, Domesticity & Denial,” in M. Golding and W. Edmundson, Philosophy of Law & Legal Theory, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, pp. 90–104.  (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1993. Feminist Jurisprudence, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Smock, P., with M. Manning and S. Gupta, 1999. “The Effect of Marriage and Divorce on Women’s Economic Well-Being,” American Sociological Review, 64: 794–812. (Scholar)
  • Stark, B., 2004. “Women, Globalization, & Law,” Pace International Law Review, 16: 333–356. (Scholar)
  • Sunder, M. (ed.), 2007. Gender and Feminist Theory in Law and Society, Aldershot: Ashgate. (Scholar)
  • Taslitz, A., 1999. Rape & the Culture of the Courtroom, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • Taub, N. and W. Williams, 1993. “Will Equality Require More Than Assimilation, Accommodation, or Separation from the Existing Social Structure” in P. Smith (ed.) 1993, pp. 48–56. (Scholar)
  • Threedy, D., 2010. “Dancing Around Gender: Lessons from Arthur Murray about Gender and Contracts,” Wake Forest Law Review, 45: 749–777. (Scholar)
  • United Nations, Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), 1979, available online.
  • United Nations, 2012 Millennium Development Goals Report 2012, available online. (Scholar)
  • Valdes, F., 1995. “Queers, Sissies, Dykes and Tomboys,” California Law Review, 83: 1–377. (Scholar)
  • Walker, L., 1979. The Battered Woman, New York: Harper & Rowe. (Scholar)
  • Weitzman, L., 1987. The Divorce Revolution: The Unexpected Social and Economic Consequences for Women and Children in America, New York: Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Weitzman, L. & M. Maclean, 1992. Economic Consequences of Divorce: International Perspectives, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Williams, J., 2010. Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001. Unbending Gender: Why Family & Work Conflict & What to Do About It, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Williams, P., 1997. Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992. The Alchemy of Race and Rights, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)

Generated Sun May 22 08:56:34 2022