Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Feminist Perspectives on Science" by Sharon Crasnow

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

Sources Cited

Additional Readings:

  • Almassi, Ben, 2019, “Beyond Science Wars Redux: Feminist Philosophy of Science as Trustworthy Science Criticism”, Hypatia, 34(4): 858–868. doi:10.1111/hypa.12500 (Scholar)
  • Amoretti, Maria Cristina and Nicla Vassallo (eds), 2016, Meta-Philosophical Reflection on Feminist Philosophies of Science, (Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science 317), Cham: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-26348-9 (Scholar)
  • Barad, Karen, 2003, “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3): 801–831. doi:10.1086/345321 (Scholar)
  • Bleier, Ruth (ed.), 1986, Feminist Approaches to Science, New York: Routledge (Scholar)
  • Blizzard, Deborah, 2007, Looking Within: A Socio-cultural Examination of Fetoscopy, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Bug, Amy, 2003, “Has Feminism Changed Physics?”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3): 881–899. doi:10.1086/345323 (Scholar)
  • Campion, Patricia and Wesley Shrum, 2004, “Gender and Science in Development: Women Scientists in Ghana, Kenya, and India”, Science, Technology, & Human Values, 29(4): 459–485. doi:10.1177/0162243904265895 (Scholar)
  • Chilly Collective, 1995, Breaking Anonymity: The Chilly Climate for Women Faculty, Waterloo ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. (Scholar)
  • Code, Lorraine, 1993, “Taking Subjectivity into Account”, in Alcoff and Potter 1993: 15–48. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, What Can She Know? Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cole, Jonathan R., 1979, Fair Science: Women in the Scientific Community, New York: The Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Crasnow, Sharon, 2018, “Contemporary Standpoint Theory: Tensions, Integrations, and Extensions”, in Garavaso 2018: 188–211. (Scholar)
  • Crasnow, Sharon and Kristen Intemann (eds), forthcoming, The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Science, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Dahlberg, Frances (ed.), 1981, Woman the Gatherer, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Douglas, Heather, 2009, Science, Policy, and the Value Free Ideal, Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ebbersmeyer, Sabrina and Gianni Paganini (eds.), 2020, Women, Philosophy and Science: Italy and Early Modern Europe, (Women in the History of Philosophy and Sciences 4), Cham: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-44548-5 (Scholar)
  • Elliott, Kevin C. and Daniel Steel (eds.), 2017, Current Controversies in Values and Science, New York: Routledge. doi:10.4324/9781315639420 (Scholar)
  • Fausto-Sterling, Anne, 1985, Myths of Gender: Biological Theories About Women and Men, New York: Basic Books. (Scholar)
  • Fedigan, Linda Marie, 1986, “The Changing Role of Women in Models of Human Evolution”, Annual Review of Anthropology, 15(1): 25–66. doi:10.1146/annurev.an.15.100186.000325 (Scholar)
  • Fedigan, Linda Marie and Laurence Fedigan, 1989, “Gender and the Study of Primates”, in Gender and Anthropology: Critical Reviews for Research and Teaching, Sandra Morgen (ed.), Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association, pp. 41–64. (Scholar)
  • Fonow, Mary Margaret and Judith A. Cook, 2005, “Feminist Methodology: New Applications in the Academy and Public Policy”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 30(4): 2211–2236. doi:10.1086/428417 (Scholar)
  • Fonow, Mary Margaret and Judith A. Cook (eds), 1991, Beyond Methodology: Feminist Scholarship as Lived Research, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fortmann, Louise (ed.), 2008, Participatory Research in Conservation and Rural Livelihoods: Doing Science Together, London: Wiley-Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Fujimura, Joan H., 2006, “Sex Genes: A Critical Sociomaterial Approach to the Politics and Molecular Genetics of Sex Determination”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 32(1): 49–82. doi:10.1086/505612 (Scholar)
  • Garry, Ann, Serene J. Khader, and Alison Stone (eds.), 2017, The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy, New York: Routledge. doi:10.4324/9781315758152 (Scholar)
  • Ginther, Donna K., 2004, “Why Women Earn Less: Economic Explanations for the Gender Salary Gap in Science”, AWIS Magazine, 33: 6–10. (Scholar)
  • Goodman, Alan H., Deborah Heath, and M. Susan Lindee (eds.), 2003, Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science beyond the Two-Culture Divide, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Greaves, Lorraine, Alison Wylie, Cheryl Champagne, Louise Karch, Ruth Lapp, Julie Lee and Bina Osthoff, 1995, “Women and Violence: Feminist Practice and Quantitative Method”, in Changing Methods: Feminist Transforming Practice, Sandra Burt and Lorraine Code (eds.), Peterborough ON: Broadview Press, pp. 301–326. (Scholar)
  • Greenwood, Mary Rita Cooke, 2000, “Plenary IV: Advancing Women into Science Leadership”, Who Will Do the Science of the Future? A Symposium on Careers of Women in Science Washington DC: National Academy Press, pp. 57–74. (Scholar)
  • Hall, Kim Q., 2017, “Feminist and Queer Intersections with Disability Studies”, in Garry, Khader, and Stone 2017: 405–418. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, “Feminism, Disability, and Embodiment”, NWSA Journal, Special Issue: Feminist Disability Studies, 14(3): vii–xii. doi:10.1353/nwsa.2003.0006 (Scholar)
  • Hammonds, Evelynn and Banu Subramaniam, 2003, “A Conversation on Feminist Science Studies”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3): 923–944. doi:10.1086/345455 (Scholar)
  • Haraway, Donna, 1989, Primate Visions: Gender, Race, and Nature in the World of Modern Science, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, New York, Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Harding, Sandra, 1991, Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking from Women’s Lives, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993, The “Racial” Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2006, Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues, Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. (Scholar)
  • Harding, Sandra and Kathryn Norberg, 2005, “New Feminist Approaches to Social Science Methodologies: An Introduction”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 30(4): 2009–2015. doi:10.1086/428420 (Scholar)
  • Hastorf, Christine A., 1991, “Gender, Space, and Food in Prehistory”, in Engendering Archaeology: Women and Prehistory, Joan M. Gero and Margaret W. Conkey (eds.), Oxford: Blackwell, 132–159. (Scholar)
  • Hesse-Biber, Sharlene (ed.), 2011, Handbook of Feminist Research, second edition, New York: Sage. (Scholar)
  • Hesse-Biber, Sharlene and Michelle L. Yaiser, 2004, Feminist Perspectives on Social Research, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hubbard, Ruth, 2003, “Science, Power, Gender: How DNA Became the Book of Life”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3): 791–799. doi:10.1086/345334 (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, The Politics of Women’s Biology, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kafer, Alison, 2003, “Compulsory Bodies: Reflections on Heterosexuality and Able- bodiedness”, Journal of Women’s History, 15(3): 77–89 (Scholar)
  • Keller, Evelyn Fox, 1983, A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock, New York: W. H. Freeman and Company. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death: Essays on Language, Gender and Science, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “The Origin, History, and Politics of the Subject Called ‘Gender and Science’: A First Person Account”, in Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, Sheila Jasanoff, Gerald E. Markle, James C. Petersen, and Trevor Pinch (eds.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 80–94. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, The Mirage of a Space Between Nature and Nurture, Durham, NC: Duke University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kitcher, Philip, 2011, Science in a Democratic Society, Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books. (Scholar)
  • Kittay, Eva, Anita Silvers, and Susan Wendell (eds.), 2001, Feminism and Disability, Special Issue of Hypatia, 16(4). (Scholar)
  • Kourany, Janet, 2017, “Philosophy of Science and the Feminist Legacy”, in Garry, Khader, and Stone 2017: 303–313. (Scholar)
  • Lloyd, Elisabeth A., 1993, “Pre-Theoretical Assumptions in Evolutionary Explanations of Female Sexuality”, Philosophical Studies, 69(2–3): 139–153. doi:10.1007/bf00990080 (Scholar)
  • Longino, Helen E., 1995, “Gender, Politics, and the Theoretical Virtues”, Synthese, 104(3): 383–397. doi:10.1007/bf01064506 (Scholar)
  • Longino, Helen and Ruth Doell, 1983, “Body, Bias, and Behavior: A Comparative Analysis of Reasoning in Two Areas of Biological Science”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 9(2): 206–227. doi:10.1086/494044 (Scholar)
  • Nelson, Lynn Hankinson, 1993, “Epistemological Communities”, in Alcoff and Potter 1993: 121–159. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “A Feminist Naturalized Philosophy of Science”, Synthese, 104(3): 399–421. doi:10.1007/bf01064507 (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, “Empiricism Without Dogmas”, in Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science, Lynn H. Nelson and Jack Nelson (eds.), Dordrecht, Boston and London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 95–119. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “Feminist Philosophies of Science: The Social and Contextual Nature of Science”, in Garavaso 2018: 236–259. (Scholar)
  • Newcombe, Nora S., 2010, “On Tending to Our Scientific Knitting: Thinking About Gender in the Context of Evolution”, in Handbook of Gender Research in Psychology, Volume 1: Gender Research in General and Experimental Psychology, Joan C. Chrisler and Donald R. McCreary (eds.), New York, NY: Springer New York, 259–274. doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-1465-1_13 (Scholar)
  • Meynell, Letitia, 2012, “Evolutionary Psychology, Ethology, and Essentialism (Because What They Don’t Know Can Hurt Us)”, Hypatia, 27(1): 3–27. doi:10.1111/j.1527-2001.2011.01240.x (Scholar)
  • Pohlhaus, Gaile, 2002, “Knowing Communities: An Investigation of Harding’s Standpoint Epistemology”, Social Epistemology, 16(3): 283–293. doi:10.1080/0269172022000025633 (Scholar)
  • Pérez Sedeño, E., 2001, “Gender: The Missing Factor in STS”, in Visions of STS: Counterpoints in Science, Technology and Society Studies, Stephen H. Cutcliffe and Carl Mitcham (eds.), Albany, NY: SUNY Press, pp. 123–138. (Scholar)
  • Potter, Elizabeth, 1995, “Good Science and Good Philosophy of Science”, Synthese, 104(3): 423–439. doi:10.1007/bf01064508 (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Gender and Boyle’s Law of Gases, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ramazanoglu, Caroline with Janet Holland, 2002, Feminist Methodology: Challenges and Choices, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (Scholar)
  • Reardon, Jenny, 2005, Race to the Finish: Identity and Governance in an Age of Genomics, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Reinharz, Shulamit, 1992, Feminist Methods in Social Research, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Richardson, Sarah S., 2010, “Feminist Philosophy of Science: History, Contributions, and Challenges”, Synthese, 177(3): 337–362. doi:10.1007/s11229-010-9791-6 (Scholar)
  • Rose, Hilary, 1983, “Hand, Brain, and Heart: A Feminist Epistemology for the Natural Sciences”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 9(1): 73–90. doi:10.1086/494025 (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994, Love, Power and Knowledge: Towards a Feminist Transformation of the Sciences, Cambridge, MA: Polity Press. (Scholar)
  • Rosser, Sue V., 2002, “Twenty-five Years of NWSA: Have We Built the Two-Way Streets Between Women’s Studies and Women in Science and Technology?” NWSA Journal, 14(1): 103–128. doi: 10.1353/nwsa.2002.0017 (Scholar)
  • Rossiter, Margaret, 1982, Women Scientists in America: Struggles and Strategies to 1940, Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins. (Scholar)
  • –––1995, Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action, 1940–1972, Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Roughgarden, Joan, 2013, Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Schiebinger, Londa 1989, The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “How Women Contribute”, Science, 285(5429): 835b–8835. doi:10.1126/science.285.5429.835b (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2003, Gender and Science: New Issues, special issue of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3). (Scholar)
  • Smith, Dorothy E., 1974, “Women’s Perspective as a Radical Critique of Sociology”, Sociological Inquiry, 44(1): 7–13. doi:10.1111/j.1475-682x.1974.tb00718.x (Scholar)
  • Smith, Dorothy E., 1978, “A Peculiar Eclipsing: Women’s Exclusion from Man’s Culture”, Women’s Studies International Quarterly, 1(4): 281–295. doi:10.1016/s0148-0685(78)91175-2 (Scholar)
  • Sonnert, Gerhard and Gerald Holton, 1995, Who Succeeds in Science? The Gender Dimension, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sperling, Susan, 1991, “Baboons with Briefcases: Feminism, Functionalism, and Sociobiology in the Evolution of Primate Gender”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 17(1): 1–27. doi:10.1086/494711 (Scholar)
  • Squier, Susan and Melissa M. Littlefield, 2004, “Feminist Theory and/of Science: Feminist Theory Special Issue”, Feminist Theory, 5(2): 123–126. doi:10.1177/1464700104045403 (Scholar)
  • Star, Susan Leigh (ed.), 1995, Ecologies of Knowledge: Work and Politics in Science and Technology, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • Strum, Shirley C. and Linda Marie Fedigan (eds.), 2000, Primate Encounters: Models of Science, Gender, and Society, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Suchman, Lucy, 2008, “Feminist STS and the Sciences of the Artificial”, in The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, third edition, Edward J. Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael E. Lynch, and Judy Wajcman (eds.), Cambridge, Massachusetts and London: The MIT Press, pp. 139–164. (Scholar)
  • Symons, Donald, 1979, The Evolution of Human Sexuality New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Tejani, Sheba, 2019, “What’s Feminist about Feminist Economics?”, Journal of Economic Methodology, 26(2): 99–117. doi:10.1080/1350178x.2018.1556799 (Scholar)
  • Watson, Patty Jo and Mary C. Kennedy, 1991, “The Development of Horticulture in the Eastern Woodlands of North America: Women’s Role”, in Engendering Archaeology: Women and Prehistory, Joan M. Gero and Margaret W. Conkey (eds.), Oxford: Blackwell, 276–300. (Scholar)
  • Wertheim, Margaret, 1995, Pythagoras’ Trousers: God, Physics and the Gender Wars, New York: Random House. (Scholar)
  • Whelan, Emma, 2001, “Politics by Other Means: Feminism and Mainstream Science Studies”, Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers Canadiens de Sociologie, 26(4): 535–581. doi:10.2307/3341492 (Scholar)
  • Wyer, Mary, Mary Barbercheck, Donna Cookmeyer, Hatice Öztürk, and Marta Wayne (eds), 2014, Women, Science and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies, third edition, New York: Routledge. doi:10.4324/9780203427415 (Scholar)
  • Wylie, Alison, 1992, “Reasoning About Ourselves: Feminist Methodology in the Social Sciences”, in Women and Reason, Elizabeth Harvey and Kathleen Okruhlik (eds.), Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, pp. 611–624. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “The Contexts of Activism on ‘Climate’ Issues”, in Breaking Anonymity: The Chilly Climate for Women Faculty, The Chilly Collective (eds.), Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, pp. 26–60. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, “The Feminism Question in Science: What Does It Mean to ‘Do Social Science as a Feminist’?”, in Handbook of Feminist Research: Theory and Praxis, Sharlene Hesse-Biber (ed.), New York: Sage, pp. 567–577. doi:10.4135/9781483384740.n26 (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “What Knowers Know Well: Standpoint Theory and the Formation of Gender Archaeology”, Scientiae Studia 15(1): 13–38. (Scholar)
  • Wylie, Alison, Janet R. Jakobsen, and Gisela Fosado, 2008, Women, Work, and the Academy: Strategies for Responding to ‘Post-civil Rights Era’ Gender Discrimination, (New Feminist Solutions, 2), New York: Barnard Center for Research on Women [Wylie, Jakobsen, and Fosado 2008 available online]. (Scholar)
  • Xie, Yu and Kimberlee A. Shauman, 2003, Women in Science: Career Processes and Outcomes, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)

Generated Sun Jan 16 12:55:35 2022