Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Feminist Perspectives on Sex Markets" by Laurie Shrage

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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Works Cited

  • Agustín, L., 2007, Sex at the Margins: Migration, Labour Markets, and the Rescue Industry, London: Zed Books. (Scholar)
  • Allen, A., 2001, “Pornography and Power”, Journal of Social Philosophy, 32: 512–31. (Scholar)
  • Almodovar, N.J., 1993, From Cop to Call Girl: Why I Left the LAPD to Make an Honest Living as a Beverly Hills Prostitute, New York: Simon and Schuster. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, “For Their Own Good: The Results of the Prostitution Laws as Enforced by Cops, Politicians, and Judges”, in Liberty for Women, W. McElroy (ed.), Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, pp. 781–87. (Scholar)
  • Anderson, E., 1993, Value in Ethics and Economics, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Anderson, S., 2006, “Prostitution and Sexual Autonomy: Making Sense of Prohibition and Prostitution”, in Spector 2006: 358–93. (Scholar)
  • Antony, L., 2017, “Be What I Say: Authority Versus Power in Pornography”, in Beyond Speech: Pornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy, M. Mikkola (ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 59–90. (Scholar)
  • Assiter, A., 1988, “Autonomy and Pornography”, in Feminist Perspectives in Philosophy, M. Griffiths and M. Whitford (eds.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Barry, K., 1996, The Prostitution of Sexuality, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • Bauer, N., 2015, How to Do Things with Pornography, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Beloso, B., 2012, “Sex, Work, and the Feminist Erasure of Class”, Signs, 38: 47–70. (Scholar)
  • Bernstein, M., (ed.), 2000, Tricks and Treats: Sex Workers Write About Their Clients, New York: Harrington Park Press. (Scholar)
  • Bianchi, C., 2008, “Indexicals, Speech Acts and Pornography”, Analysis, 68: 310–16. (Scholar)
  • Bishop, R. and L. Robinson, 1998, Night Market: Sexual Cultures and the Thai Economic Miracle, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Bordo, S., 1994, “Reading the Male Body”, in The Male Body: Features, Destinies, Exposures, L. Goldstein (ed.), Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. (Scholar)
  • Brison, S., 1998, “The Autonomy Defense of Free Speech”, Ethics, 108: 312–39. (Scholar)
  • Brod, H., 1992, “Pornography and the Alienation of Male Sexuality”, in Rethinking Masculinity: Philosophical Explorations in Light of Feminism, L. May and R. Strikwerda (eds.), Lanham: Littlefield Adams, pp. 237–54. (Scholar)
  • Bronstein, C., 2011, Battling Pornography: The American Feminist Anti-Pornography Movement, 1976–1986, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Butler, C., 2015, “A Critical Race Feminist Perspective on Prostitution & Sex Trafficking in America”, Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, 27: 95–139. (Scholar)
  • Butler, J., 2000, “The Force of Fantasy: Feminism, Mapplethorpe, and Discursive Excess”, in Cornell 2000b: 487–508. (Scholar)
  • Cahill, A., 2014, “The Difference Sameness Makes: Objectification, Sex Work, and Queerness”, Hypatia, 29: 840–56. (Scholar)
  • Cameron, D. and E. Frazer, 2000, “On the Question of Pornography and Sexual Violence: Moving Beyond Cause and Effect”, in Cornell 2000b: 240–53. (Scholar)
  • Concepcion, C., 1999, “On Pornography, Representation, and Sexual Agency”, Hypatia, 14: 97–100. (Scholar)
  • Cornell, D., 2000a, “Pornography’s Temptation”, in Cornell 2000b: 551–68. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2000b, Feminism and Pornography, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Davis, A., 2015, “Regulating Sex Work: Erotic Assimilationism, Erotic Exceptionalism, and the Challenge of Intimate Labor”, California Law Review, 103: 1195–1275. (Scholar)
  • de Marneffe, P., 2010, Liberalism and Prostitution, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “Vice Laws and Self-Sovereignty”, Criminal Law and Philosophy, 7: 29–41. (Scholar)
  • Ditmore, M.H., 2011, Prostitution and Sex Work, Santa Barbara: Greenwood. (Scholar)
  • Duggan, L., N. Hunter, and C. Vance, 1986, “False Promises: Feminist Antipornography Legislation”, in Ellis et al. 1986: 72–85. (Scholar)
  • Dworkin, A., 1979, Pornography: Men Possessing Women, New York: Perigee Books. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Intercourse, New York: Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Dwyer, S. (ed.), 1995, The Problem of Pornography, Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Company. (Scholar)
  • Eaton, A., 2007, “A Sensible Antiporn Feminism”, Ethics, 117: 674–715. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Feminist Pornography”, in Beyond Speech: Pornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy, M. Mikkola (ed.), Oxford Scholarship Online. (Scholar)
  • Ellis, K., et al., 1986, Caught Looking: Feminism, Pornography, and Censorship, Seattle: The Real Comet Press. (Scholar)
  • Enloe, C., 1989, Bananas, Beaches, and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Ferguson, C. and R. Hartley, 2009, “The Pleasure is Momentary…The Expense Damnable? The Influence of Pornography on Rape and Sexual Assault”, Aggression and Violent Behavior, 14: 323–29. (Scholar)
  • Garry, A., 1978, “Pornography and Respect for Women”, in Social Theory and Practice, 4: 395–421. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, “Sex, Lies, and Pornography”, in Ethics in Practice, 2nd edition, H. La Follette (ed.), Malden: Blackwell Publishing, pp. 344–55. (Scholar)
  • Highleyman, L., 1997, “Professional Dominance: Power, Money, and Identity”, in Nagle 1997: 145–55. (Scholar)
  • Hornsby, J., 1995, “Speech Acts and Pornography”, in Dwyer 1995: 220–32. (Scholar)
  • Hunt, L. (ed.), 1993, The Invention of Pornography: Obscenity and the Origins of Modernity, 1500–1800, New York: Zone Books. (Scholar)
  • Jaggar, A., 1985, “Prostitution”, in Women and Values, M. Pearsall (ed.), Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Company, pp. 132–46. (Scholar)
  • Jeffreys, S., 1998, The Idea of Prostitution, North Melbourne, AU: Spinifex Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, The Industrial Vagina, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Kempadoo, K. (ed.), 1999, Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean, Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, “Women of Color and the Global Sex Trade: Transnational Feminist Perspectives”, Meridians, 1: 28–51. (Scholar)
  • Kempadoo, K. and J. Doezema (eds.), 1998, Global Sex Workers: Rights, Resistance, and Redefinition, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Kotiswaran, P., 2011, Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Langton, R., 1995, “Speech Acts and Unspeakable Acts”, in Dwyer 1995: 203–19. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, Sexual Solipsism, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Leigh, C., 1997, “Inventing Sex Work”, in Nagle 1997: 225–31. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, Unrepentant Whore: Collected Works of Scarlot Harlot, San Francisco: Last Gasp. (Scholar)
  • LeMoncheck, L., 1997, Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lerner, G., 1986, The Creation of Patriarchy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Levin, A., 2009, “Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Dworkin’s Egalitarian Liberalism”, Public Affairs Quarterly, 23: 357–73. (Scholar)
  • Liberto, H.R., 2009, “Normalizing Prostitution versus Normalizing the Alienability of Sexual Rights: A Response to Scott A. Anderson”, Ethics, 120: 138–45. (Scholar)
  • Longino, H., 1980, “Pornography, Oppression, and Freedom: A Closer Look”, in Take Back the Night: Women on Pornography, L. Lederer (ed.), New York: William Morrow and Company, pp. 40–54. (Scholar)
  • MacKinnon, C., 1987, Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993, Only Words, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Malamuth, N., T. Addison, and M. Koss, 2000, “Pornography and Sexual Aggression: Are There Reliable Effects and Can We Understand Them?” Annual Review of Sex Research, 11: 26–91. (Scholar)
  • Marganski, A., 2012, “Prostitution, Contemporary”, in The Social History of Crime and Punishment in America, W.R. Miller (ed.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, pp. 1450–56. (Scholar)
  • Marino, P., 2008, “The Ethics of Sexual Objectification: Autonomy and Consent”, Inquiry, 51: 345–64. (Scholar)
  • McGowan, M., 2005, “On Pornography: MacKinnon, Speech Acts, and ‘False’ Construction”, Hypatia, 20: 23–49. (Scholar)
  • McGowan, M.K., A. Adelman, S.Helmers, and J. Stolzenberg, 2011, “A Partial Defense of Illocutionary Silencing”, Hypatia, 26: 132–49. doi: 10.1111/j.1527-2001.2010.01122.x (Scholar)
  • Mikkola, M., 2008, “Contexts and Pornography”, Analysis, 68: 316–20. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Illocution, Silencing and the Act of RefusalPacific Philosophical Quarterly, 92: 415–37. (Scholar)
  • Mikkola, M. (ed.) 2017, Beyond Speech: Pornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy, Oxford Scholarship Online. (Scholar)
  • Moen, O.M., 2012, “Is Prostitution Harmful?Journal of Medical Ethics, 40: 73–81. (Scholar)
  • Nagle, J., 1997, (ed.), Whores and Other Feminists, New York: Routledge.
  • Nestle, J., 1987, “Lesbians and Prostitutes: A Historical Sisterhood”, in Sex Work: Writings by Women in the Sex Industry, F. Delacoste and P. Alexander (eds.) San Francisco: Cleis Press, pp. 247–65. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, M., 1999, Sex and Social Justice, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Overall, C., 1992, “What’s Wrong with Prostitution?: Evaluating Sex Work”, Signs, 17: 705–24. (Scholar)
  • O’Connell Davidson, J., 1998, Prostitution, Power, and Freedom, Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. (Scholar)
  • Pateman, C., 1988, The Sexual Contract, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pendleton, E., 1997, “Love for Sale: Queering Heterosexuality”, in Nagle 1997: 73–82. (Scholar)
  • Phillips, A., 2011, “It’s My Body and I’ll Do What I Like With It: Bodies as Objects and Property”, Political Theory, 39: 724–48. (Scholar)
  • Quan, T., 2001, Diary of a Manhattan Call Girl, New York: Crown. (Scholar)
  • Queen, C., 1997, Real Live Nude Girl: Chronicles of Sex-Positive Culture, San Francisco: Cleis. (Scholar)
  • Radin, M., 1996, Contested Commodities, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Radway, J., 1991, Reading the Romance: Women, Patriarchy, and Popular Literature, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. (Scholar)
  • Rajan, R.S., 2003, The Scandal of the State: Women, Law, and Citizenship in Postcolonial India, Durham: Duke University Press. (Scholar)
  • Raymond, J., 2004, “Prostitution on Demand: Legalizing the Buyers as Sexual Consumers”, Violence Against Women, 10: 1156–86. (Scholar)
  • Ross, B., 2000, “‘It’s Merely Designed for Sexual Arousal’: Interrogating the Indefensibility of Lesbian Smut”, in Cornell 2000b: 264–317. (Scholar)
  • Rossiaud, J., 1988, Medieval Prostitution, Oxford: Basil Blackwell Press. (Scholar)
  • Rubin, G., 1975, “The Traffic in Women: Notes on the ‘Political Economy’ of Sex”, in Toward an Anthropology of Women, R. Reiter (ed.), New York: Monthly Review Press, pp. 157–210. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993, “Misguided, Dangerous and Wrong, an Analysis of Anti-pornography Politics”, in Bad Girls and Dirty Pictures: The Challenge to Reclaim Feminism, A. Assiter and A. Carol (eds.), London: Pluto Press, pp. 18–40. (Scholar)
  • Satz, D., 1995, “Markets in Women’s Sexual Labor”, Ethics, 106: 63–85. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010, Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Saul, J., 2006a, “On Treating Things as People: Objectification, Pornography, and the History of the Vibrator”, Hypatia, 21: 45–61. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006b, “Pornography, Speech Acts, and Contexts”, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 106: 229–248. (Scholar)
  • Schwarzenbach, S., 1991, “Contractarians and Feminists Debate Prostitution”, New York University Review of Law and Social Change, 18: 103–30. (Scholar)
  • Scully, D., 1990, Understanding Sexual Violence: A Study of Convicted Rapists, London: HarperCollins Academic. (Scholar)
  • Shrage, L., 1989, “Should Feminists Oppose Prostitution?Ethics, 99: 347–61. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994, Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery, and Abortion, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, “Prostitution and the Case for Decriminalization”, Dissent, 43: 41–45. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Do Lesbian Prostitutes Have Sex With Their Clients? A Clintonesque Reply”, Sexualities, 2: 259–61. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Exposing the Fallacies of Anti-Porn Feminism”, Feminist Theory, 6: 45–65. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015, “When Prostitution is Nobody’s Business”, The New York Times (Opinionator/The Stone section), August 10, 2015. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, “Prostitution”, in Philosophy of Sex and Love, J. Petrik and A. Zucker (eds.), Farmington Hills: Macmillan Reference USA. (Scholar)
  • Shrage, L. and Stewart, R.S., 2015, Philosophizing About Sex, Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press. (Scholar)
  • Snitow, A., 1986, “Retrenchment vs. Transformation”, in Ellis et al. 1986: 10–17. (Scholar)
  • Spector, J. (ed.), 2006, Prostitution and Pornography: Philosophical Debate About the Sex Industry, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sprinkle, A., 1998, Post-Porn Modernist: My 25 Years as a Multimedia Whore, San Francisco: Cleis. (Scholar)
  • Stark, C. and R. Whisnant (eds.), 2004, Not For Sale: Feminists Resisting Prostitution and Pornography, North Melbourne: Spinifex Press. (Scholar)
  • Stewart, R.S., 2019, “Is Feminist Porn Possible?”, Sexuality & Culture, 23: 254–70. (Scholar)
  • Strossen, N., 1995, Defending Pornography: Free Speech, Sex, and the Fight for Women’s Rights, New York: Scribner. (Scholar)
  • Tuana, N. and L. Shrage, 2003, “Sexuality”, in The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics, H. LaFollette (ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 15–41. (Scholar)
  • Vadas, M., 2005, “The Manufacture-for-use of Pornography and Women’s Inequality”, The Journal of Political Philosophy, 13: 174–93. (Scholar)
  • Warnke, G., 1999, Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Watson, L., 2019, “Philosophical Debates About Prostitution: The State of the Question”, The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 57: 165–93. (Scholar)
  • White, L., 1990, The Comforts of Home: Prostitution in Colonial Nairobi, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Zheng, R., 2017, “Race and Pornography: The Dilemma of the (Un)Desirable”, in Beyond Speech: Pornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy, M. Mikkola (ed.), Oxford Scholarship Online. (Scholar)

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