Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Frederick Douglass" by Ronald Sundstrom

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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Primary Sources

Works by Douglass

  • 1845, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written By Himself. Two modern editions are
    • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, 2nd edition, David W. Blight (ed.), Boston, MA: Bedford Books of St. Martin’s Press, 2003.
    • [FDN-Davis], Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself: A New Critical Edition, Angela Y. Davis (ed.), San Francisco: City Lights Books, 2010.
  • 1848a, “Address to the Colored People of the United States”, in FDLW v.1: 331–36.
  • 1848b, “The Folly of Racially Exclusive Organization”, in FDP1 v.2: 109–11.
  • 1851, “To Gerrit Smith, Esq.”, January 21, in FDSW: 171–172. (Scholar)
  • 1852a, My Bondage and My Freedom, in FDAB: 103–452); also the standalone edition:
    • My Bondage and My Freedom, William L. Andrews (ed.), Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1987.
  • 1852b, “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro”, in FDLW v.2: 181–204.
  • 1854, “The Claims of the Negro Ethnologically Considered: An Address Before the Literary Societies, Western Reserve College”, July 12, Rochester, NY: Lee, Mann & co. Reprinted in FDP1 v.2: 497–525. (Scholar)
  • 1859, “Capt. John Brown Not Insane”, in FDLW v.2: 458–60.
  • 1860, “The Trials and Triumphs of Self-Made Men”, in FDP1 v.3: 289–300.
  • 1869, “We Welcome the Fifteenth Amendment: Addresses Delivered in New York, on 12–13 May 1869”, in FDP1 v.4: 213–19.
  • 1876, “Oration in Memory of Abraham Lincoln”, in FDLW v.4: 309–20.
  • 1879, “The Negro Exodus from the Gulf States”, in FDP1 v.4: 510–33.
  • 1881 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, in FDAB 453–1045.
  • 1883a, “The Civil Rights Case”, in FDLW v.4: 392–403.
  • 1883b, “Address to the People of the United States”, delivered at a Convention of Colored Men, Louisville, Kentucky, September 25, in FDSW: 669–85. (Scholar)
  • 1884, “God Almighty Made but One Race”, in FDP1 v.5: 145–47.
  • 1888, “In Law Free; in Fact, Slave”, in FDP1 v.5: 357–73.
  • 1893, “Self-Made Men”, in FDP1 v.5: 545–75.
  • 1894a, “Lessons of the Hour”, in FDP1 v.5: 575–607.
  • 1894b, “The Folly of Colonization”, in Brotz 1992: 328–31. (Scholar)

Collections

  • [FDAB] Douglass: Autobiographies: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass | My Bondage and My Freedom | Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, 1994, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (ed.), New York, NY: Library of America. (Scholar)
  • [FDLW] The Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass, 1950–1975, 5 volumes (annotated v.1 – v.5 above), Philip Sheldon Foner (ed.), New York, NY: International Publishers.
  • [FDP] The Frederick Douglass Papers, New Haven, CN: Yale University Press.
    • [FDP1] Series One, Speeches, Debates, and Interviews, 5 volumes (annotated v.1 – v.5 above), John W. Blassingame (ed.), 1979.
    • [FDP2] Series Two, Autobiographical Writings, John W. Blassingame (ed.), 1979–1999.
    • [FDP3] Series Three, Correspondence, John R. McKivigan (ed.), 2009.
  • [FDSW] Frederick Douglass: Selected Speeches and Writings, 1999, 1st edition, The Library of Black America, Philip Sheldon Foner and Yuval Taylor (eds.), Chicago, IL: Lawrence Hill Books. (Scholar)
  • [FDWR] Frederick Douglass on Women’s Rights, 1976, Philip Sheldon Foner (ed.), Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies. Westport, CN: Greenwood Press. (Scholar)

Secondary Literature

  • Appiah, Anthony, 1985, “The Uncompleted Argument: Du Bois and the Illusion of Race”, Critical Inquiry, 12(1): 21–37. Reprinted in 1986 “Race”, Writing and Difference, Henry Louis Gates. Jr. (ed.), Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 21–37. doi:10.1086/448319 (Scholar)
  • Boxill, Bernard R., 1984 [1992], Blacks and Social Justice, original edition, Totowa, NJ: Rowman and Allanheld, 1984; revised edition, Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 1992. (Pages numbers from the revised edition.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992 [1997], “Two Traditions in African American Political Philosophy”, Philosophical Forum, 24 (1992): 119–35; issue reprinted as a book, African-American Perspectives and Philosophical Traditions, John P. Pittman (ed.), New York, NY: Routledge, 1997, 119–35; also reprinted as African Philosophy: An Anthology, Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (ed.), Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 1998. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, “The Fight with Covey”, in Existence in Black: An Anthology of Black Existential Philosophy, Lewis R. Gordon (ed.), New York, NY: Routledge, 273–90. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998, “Radical Implications of Locke’s Moral Theory: The Views of Frederick Douglass”, in Lott 1998: 29–48. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Douglass against the Emigrationists”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 21–49. (Scholar)
  • Brotz, Howard, 1992, African-American Social and Political Thought, 1850–1920, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. (Scholar)
  • Buccola, Nicholas, 2012, The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty, New York: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • Casas, Bartolomé de las, 1552 [1992], The Devastation of the Indies: A Brief Account, Herma Briffault (trans.), Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cruse, Harold, 1967, The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual: A Historical Analysis of the Failure of Black Leadership, New York: Morrow. Reprinted 2005 New York Review Books Classics. New York: New York Review Books. (Scholar)
  • Davis, Angela Y., 1971, Lectures on Liberation, New York: New York Committee to Free Angela Davis. (Scholar)
  • –––, [1971] 1983, “Unfinished Lecture on Liberation-II”, in Philosophy Born of Struggle: Anthology of Afro-American Philosophy from 1917, Leonard Harris (ed.), Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 130–36. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison: Frederick Douglass and the Convict Lease System”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 339–62. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture, first edition, New York: Seven Stories Press. (Scholar)
  • Delany, Martin Robison, 1852, The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States, reprinted in 1968 (The American Negro: His History and Literature series), New York: Arno Press and the New York Times. (Scholar)
  • Du Bois, W.E.B., 1897, “The Conservation of Races”, in Brotz 1992: 483–92. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1903, The Souls of Black Folk, Reprinted by
    • 1997, David W. Blight, and Robert Gooding-Williams (eds), Boston: Bedford Books. (Scholar)
    • 1999, Henry Louis Gates, and Terri Hume Oliver (eds), 1st edition, A Norton Critical Edition, New York: W.W. Norton.
  • –––, 1909, John Brown, (American Crisis Biographies), Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer (ed.), Philadelphia: G.W. Jacobs & company. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1935, Black Reconstruction in America: An Essay toward a History of the Part Which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America, 1860–1880, New York: Harcourt, Brace. Reprinted 2007 as part of the The Oxford W.E.B. Du Bois series, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • DuBois, Ellen Carol, 1978, Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women’s Movement in America, 1848–1869, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1850 [2004], Representative Men: Seven Lectures, Brenda Wineapple (ed.), Modern Library pbk. ed. New York, NY: Modern Library. (Scholar)
  • Foner, Philip Sheldon, 1964, Frederick Douglass: A Biography, New York: Citadel Press. (Scholar)
  • Frederickson, George M., 2002, Racism: A Short History, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gooding-Williams, Robert, 2009, In the Shadow of Du Bois: Afro-Modern Political Thought in America, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gordon, Lewis R., 1999, “Douglass as an Existentialist”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 207–26. (Scholar)
  • Gordon, Milton Myron, 1964, Assimilation in American Life: The Role of Race, Religion, and National Origins, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Guy-Sheftall, Beverly (ed.), 1995, Words of Fire: An Anthology of African-American Feminist Thought, New York: New Press. (Scholar)
  • Haney-López, Ian, 2006, White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race, revised and updated, 10th anniversary edition, (Critical America), New York, NY: New York University Press. (Scholar)
  • Harris, Leonard (ed.), 1989, The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond, Philadelphia: Temple University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hine, Darlene Clark, 1994, Hine Sight: Black Women and the Re-Construction of American History, Brooklyn, NY: Carlson Pub.. (Scholar)
  • Howe, Daniel Walker, 1997, Making the American Self, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • James, Joy, 1997, Transcending the Talented Tenth: Black Leaders and American Intellectuals, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1998, The Angela Y. Davis Reader (Blackwell Readers), Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Jefferson, Thomas, 1785, Notes on the State of Virginia, reprinted 1999, Frank Shuffelton (ed.), New York, NY: Penguin Books. (Scholar)
  • Lawson, Bill E. and Frank M. Kirkland (eds), 1999, Frederick Douglass: A Critical Reader, Blackwell Critical Readers, Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. (Scholar)
  • Lee, Maurice S. (ed.), 2009, The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass (Cambridge Companions to American Studies), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lemert, Charles C. and Esme Bhan (eds), 1998, The Voice of Anna Julia Cooper: Including a Voice from the South and Other Important Essays, Papers, and Letters, Legacies of Social Thought. Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Lott, Tommy Lee (ed.), 1998, Subjugation and Bondage: Critical Essays on Slavery and Social Philosophy, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, The Invention of Race: Black Culture and the Politics of Representation, Malden, MA: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Martin, Waldo E., 1985, The Mind of Frederick Douglass, Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. (Scholar)
  • McCarthy, Thomas, 2009, Race, Empire, and the Idea of Human Development, Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • McFeely, William S., 1991, Frederick Douglass, New York: Norton & Company. (Scholar)
  • McGary, Howard, 1999a, “Douglass on Racial Assimilation and Racial Institutions”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 50–63. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999b, Race and Social Justice, Malden, MA: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • McGary, Howard, and Bill E. Lawson, 1992, Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mills, Charles W., 1997, The Racial Contract, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Whose Fourth of July? Frederick Douglass and ‘Original Intent’”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 100–42. (Scholar)
  • Moses, Wilson Jeremiah, 1978, The Golden Age of Black Nationalism, 1850–1925, Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books. (Scholar)
  • Myers, Peter C., 2008, Frederick Douglass: Race and the Rebirth of American Liberalism, American Political Thought. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. (Scholar)
  • Nott, Josiah Clark, and George R. Gliddon, 1854, Types of Mankind: Or, Ethnological Researches, Based Upon the Ancient Monuments, Paintings, Sculptures, and Crania of Races, and Upon Their Natural, Geographical, Philological and Biblical History; Illustrated by Selections from the Inedited Papers of Samuel George Morton … And by Additional Contributions from Prof. L. Agassiz, Ll. D., W. Usher, M.D., and Prof. H.S. Patterson, M.D., Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & co. [Nott and Gliddon 1854 available online] (Scholar)
  • Outlaw, Lucius, 1996, “Against the Grain of Modernity: The Politics of Difference and the Conservation of ‘Race’”, in On Race and Philosophy, Lucius Outlaw (ed.), New York, NY: Routledge, 135–57. (Scholar)
  • Patterson, Orlando, 1982, Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pettit, Philip, 1997,Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government, Oxford Political Theory, New York, NY: Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/0198296428.001.0001 (Scholar)
  • Pittman, John, 1999, “Douglass’s Assimilationism and Antislavery”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 64–81. (Scholar)
  • Preston, Dickson J., 1980, Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, [D], “The Discourses” and Other Early Political Writings, Victor Gourevitch (ed./trans.), Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought. Cambridge, U.K.; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997. (Scholar)
  • –––, [SC], “The Social Contract” and Other Later Political Writings, Victor Gourevitch (ed./trans.), Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought. Cambridge, U.K.; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997. (Scholar)
  • Schrader, David E., 1999, “Natural Law in the Constitutional Thought of Frederick Douglass”, in Lawson and Kirkland 1999: 85–99. (Scholar)
  • Shelby, Tommie, 2005, We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, 1997a, “Manhood Suffrage”, in The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony: In the School of Anti-Slavery, 1866 to 1873, volume 2, Ann D. Gordon (ed.), New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 194–99. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997b, “The Sixteenth Amendment”, in The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony: In the School of Anti-Slavery, 1866 to 1873, volume 2, Ann D. Gordon (ed.), New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 236–38. (Scholar)
  • Sundstrom, Ronald R., 2003, “Douglass & Du Bois’s Der Schwarze Volksgeist”, in Race and Racism in Continental Philosophy, Robert Bernasconi (ed.), Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 32–52. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, The Browning of America and the Evasion of Social Justice, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Van Wyhe, John, 2004, Combe’s Constitution of Man, and Nineteenth-Century Responses, 3 volumes, Bristol, England: Thoemmes Continuum. (Scholar)
  • Wallace, Maurice O., 2009, “Violence, Manhood, and War in Douglass”, in Lee 2009: 73–88. (Scholar)
  • Washington, Booker T., 1907, Frederick Douglass, American Crisis Biographies. Philadelphia, PA; London: G.W. Jacobs & Co. (Scholar)
  • Wells-Barnett, Ida B., 2002, On Lynchings, Classics in Black Studies. Amherst, NY: Humanity Books. Reprint of “Southern Horrors” (1892), “A Red Record” (1895), and “Mob Rule in New Orleans” (1900). (Scholar)
  • Wilkerson, Isabel, 2010, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration, 1st edition, New York: Random House. (Scholar)
  • Willett, Cynthia, 1998, “The Master-Slave Dialectic: Hegel vs. Douglass”, in Lott 1998: 151–70. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, The Soul of Justice: Social Bonds and Racial Hubris, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)

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