Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Happiness" by Dan Haybron

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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  • Alexandrova, A. (2005). “Subjective Well-Being and Kahneman's ‘Objective Happiness’,” Journal of Happiness Studies, 6: 301-324. (Scholar)
  • Alexandrova, A. (2008). “First-Person Reports and the Measurement of Happiness,” Philosophical Psychology, 21(5): 571-583. (Scholar)
  • Alexandrova, A. and D. M. Haybron (forthcoming). “High Fidelity Economics,” The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, W. Hands and J. Davis (eds.). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar. (Scholar)
  • Almeder, R. (2000). Human Happiness and Morality, Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Press. (Scholar)
  • Angner, E. (2010). “Are subjective measures of well-being ‘direct’?” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 89(1): 115–130. (Scholar)
  • Angner, E. (2011). “The Evolution of Eupathics: The Historical Roots of Subjective Measures of Well-Being,” International Journal of Wellbeing, 1(1): 4–41. (Scholar)
  • Annas, J. (1993). The Morality of Happiness, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Annas, J. (2011). Intelligent Virtue, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Argyle, M. (1999). “Causes and Correlates of Happiness,” Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology, D. Kahneman, E. Diener and N. Schwarz (eds.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation: 3-25. (Scholar)
  • Argyle, M. (2002). The Psychology of Happiness, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Barrow, R. (1980). Happiness and Schooling, New York: St. Martin's Press. (Scholar)
  • Barrow, R. (1991). Utilitarianism: A Contemporary Statement, Brookfield, VT: Edward Elgar. (Scholar)
  • Belliotti, R. A. (2004). Happiness Is Overrated, New York: Rowman & Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Benditt, T. M. (1974). “Happiness,” Philosophical Studies, 25: 1–20. (Scholar)
  • Benditt, T. M. (1978). “Happiness and Satisfaction--A Rejoinder to Carson,” The Personalist, 59: 108-9. (Scholar)
  • Biswas-Diener, R., J. Vittersø and E. Diener (2005). “Most People are Pretty Happy, but There is Cultural Variation: The Inughuit, The Amish, and The Maasai,” The Journal of Happiness Studies, 6(3): 205-226. (Scholar)
  • Block, N. (1995). “On a Confusion About A Function of Consciousness,” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 18: 227–247. (Scholar)
  • Bok, D. (2010a). The Politics of Happiness: What Government Can Learn from the New Research on Well-Being, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Bok, S. (2010b). Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Boniwell, I. and S. David, Eds. (forthcoming). The Oxford Handbook of Happiness, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Bortolotti, L., Ed. (2009). Philosophy and Happiness, New York: Palgrave Macmillan. (Scholar)
  • Brandt, R. B. (1959). Ethical Theory, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. (Scholar)
  • Brandt, R. B. (1979). A Theory of the Good and the Right, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Brandt, R. B. (1989). “Fairness to Happiness,” Social Theory & Practice, 15: 33–58. (Scholar)
  • Brandt, R. B. (1992). Morality, Utilitarianism, and Rights, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brülde, B. (2007). “Happiness theories of the good life,” Journal of Happiness Studies, 8(1): 15–49. (Scholar)
  • Buss, S. (2004). “The Irrationality of Unhappiness and the Paradox of Despair,” Journal of Philosophy, CI(4): 171–200. (Scholar)
  • Cahn, S. M. and C. Vitrano, Eds. (2008). Happiness: Classical and Contemporary Readings in Philosophy, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Campbell, R. (1973). “The Pursuit Of Happiness,” Personalist, 54: 325–337. (Scholar)
  • Carson, T. L. (1978a). “Happiness and Contentment: A Reply to Benditt,” The Personalist, 59: 101–7. (Scholar)
  • Carson, T. L. (1978b). “Happiness and the Good Life,” Southwestern Journal of Philosophy, 9: 73–88. (Scholar)
  • Carson, T. L. (1979). “Happiness and the Good Life: a Rejoinder to Mele,” Southwestern Journal of Philosophy, 10: 189–192. (Scholar)
  • Carson, T. L. (1981). “Happiness, Contentment, and the Good Life,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 62: 378–92. (Scholar)
  • Chekola, M. (2007). “Happiness, Rationality, Autonomy and the Good Life,” Journal of Happiness Studies, 8(1): 51–78. (Scholar)
  • Christakis, N., J. Fowler, Simon, i. Schuster, P. D. Audio and L. Findaway World (2009). Connected: The surprising power of our social networks and how they shape our lives, New York: Little, Brown and Co. (Scholar)
  • Davis, W. (1981a). “Pleasure and Happiness,” Philosophical Studies, 39: 305–318. (Scholar)
  • Davis, W. (1981b). “A Theory of Happiness,” American Philosophical Quarterly, 18: 111–20. (Scholar)
  • Den Uyl, D. and T. R. Machan (1983). “Recent Work on the Concept of Happiness,” American Philosophical Quarterly, 20: 115–34. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E. (2008). “Myths in the Science of Happiness, and Directions for Future Research,” The Science of Subjective Well-Being, M. Eid and R. J. Larsen (eds.), New York: Guilford Press: 493-514. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E. and R. Biswas-Diener (2008). Happiness: unlocking the mysteries of psychological wealth, Malden, MA: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E. and C. Diener (1996). “Most People Are Happy,” Psychological Science, 7(3): 181–185. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E., R. E. Lucas, U. Schimmack and J. F. Helliwell (2009). Well-Being for Public Policy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E., R. E. Lucas and C. N. Scollon (2006). “Beyond the Hedonic Treadmill: Revising the Adaptation Theory of Well-Being,” American Psychologist, 61(4): 305-314. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E., W. Ng, J. Harter and R. Arora (2010). “Wealth and happiness across the world: Material prosperity predicts life evaluation, whereas psychosocial prosperity predicts positive feeling,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 99(1): 52–61. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E. and M. Seligman (2004). “Beyond Money: Toward an economy of well-being,” Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 5(1): 1-31. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E. and E. M. Suh, Eds. (2000). Culture and Subjective Well-Being, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Diener, E., E. M. Suh, R. E. Lucas and H. L. Smith (1999). “Subjective Well-Being: Three Decades of Progress,” Psychological Bulletin, 125(2): 276-302. (Scholar)
  • Dolan, P. and M. P. White (2007). “How can measures of subjective well-being be used to inform public policy?” Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2(1): 71-85. (Scholar)
  • Doris, J. (2002). Lack of Character, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Doris, J. M. (2009). “Skepticism about persons,” Philosophical Issues, 19(1): 57–91. (Scholar)
  • Easterlin, R. (1974). “Does Economic Growth Improve the Human Lot?” Nations and Households in Economic Growth: Essays in Honor of Moses Abramovitz, P. A. David and M. W. Reder (eds.), New York: Academic Press. (Scholar)
  • Easterlin, R. (2003). “Explaining Happiness,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 100(19): 11176–11183. (Scholar)
  • Easterlin, R. A. (2005). “Building a Better Theory of Well-Being,” Economics and Happiness, L. Bruni and P. L. Porta (eds.), New York: Oxford, 29-65. (Scholar)
  • Ebenstein, A. O. (1991). The Greatest Happiness Principle: An Examination of Utilitarianism, New York: Garland. (Scholar)
  • Edgeworth, F. Y. (1881). Mathematical Psychics: an Essay on the Application of Mathematics to the Moral Sciences, London: Kegan Paul. (Scholar)
  • Eid, M. and R. J. Larsen, Eds. (2008). The Science of Subjective Well-Being, New York: Guilford. (Scholar)
  • Elster, J. (1983). Sour Grapes, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Epictetus (1925). The Discourses as Reported by Arrian, The Manual, and Fragments, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Everett, D. L. (2009). Don't sleep, there are snakes: Life and language in the Amazonian jungle, New York: Random House. (Scholar)
  • Feldman, F. (2004). Pleasure and the Good Life, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Feldman, F. (2010). What Is This Thing Called Happiness?, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • Flanagan, O. (2007). The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Fogel, R. W. (2005). “Changes in the disparities in chronic diseases during the course of the 20th century,” Perspectives in biology and medicine, 48(1 Supplement): S150-S165. (Scholar)
  • Frederick, S. and G. Loewenstein (1999). “Hedonic Adaptation,” Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology, D. Kahneman, E. Diener and N. Schwarz (eds.), New York: Russell Sage Foundation Press: 302-29. (Scholar)
  • Fredrickson, B. L. (2004). “The Broaden-and-Build Theory of Positive Emotions,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 359(1449): 1367–1377 (Scholar)
  • Fredrickson, B. L. and D. Kahneman (1993). “Duration neglect in retrospective evaluations of affective episodes,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65(1): 45–55. (Scholar)
  • Fredrickson, B. L. and M. F. Losada (2005). “Positive Affect and the Complex Dynamics of Human Flourishing,” American Psychologist, 60(7): 678–686. (Scholar)
  • Frey, B. S. (2008). Happiness: A Revolution in Economics, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Frumkin, H. (2001). “Beyond toxicity: Human health and the natural environment,” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 20(3): 234–240. (Scholar)
  • Gilbert, D. (2006). Stumbling on Happiness, New York: Knopf. (Scholar)
  • Gilovitch, T., D. Griffin and D. Kahneman, Eds. (2002). Heuristics and Biases: The Psychology of Intuitive Judgment, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Glaeser, E. L. (2006). “Paternalism and Psychology,” University of Chicago Law Review, 73(1): 133–156. (Scholar)
  • Goldstein, I. (1973). “Happiness: The Role of Non-Hedonic Criteria in Its Evaluation,” International Philosophical Quarterly, 13: 523-34. (Scholar)
  • Goldstein, I. (1981). “Cognitive Pleasure and Distress,” Philosophical Studies, 39: 15–23. (Scholar)
  • Goldstein, I. (1989). “Pleasure and Pain: Unconditional, Intrinsic Values,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 50(2): 255–276. (Scholar)
  • Goldstein, I. (2002). “Are emotions feelings? A further look at hedonic theories of emotions,” Consciousness and Emotion, 3(1): 21–33. (Scholar)
  • Graham, C. (2009). Happiness around the world: The paradox of happy peasants and miserable millionaires, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, J. (1979). “Is Unhappiness Morally More Important Than Happiness?Philosophical Quarterly, 29: 47–55. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, J. (1986). Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement, and Moral Importance, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, J. (2000). “Replies,” Well-Being and Morality, R. Crisp and B. Hooker (eds.), New York: Oxford: 281-313. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, J. (2007). “What Do Happiness Studies Study?” Journal of Happiness Studies, 8(1): 139–148. (Scholar)
  • Haidt, J. (2001). “The emotional dog and its rational tail: A social intuitionist approach to moral judgment,” Psychological Review, 108(4): 814–834. (Scholar)
  • Hare, R. M. (1963). Freedom and Reason, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hausman, D. M. and B. Welch (2009). “Debate: To Nudge or Not to Nudge,” Journal of Political Philosophy, 18(1): 123–136. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2000). “Two Philosophical Problems in the Study of Happiness,” The Journal of Happiness Studies, 1(2): 207–225. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2001). “Happiness and Pleasure,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 62(3): 501–528. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2003). “What Do We Want from a Theory of Happiness?Metaphilosophy, 34(3): 305–329. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2005). “On Being Happy or Unhappy,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 71(2): 287–317. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2007a). “Do We Know How Happy We Are?Nous, 41(3): 394–428. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2007b). “Life Satisfaction, Ethical Reflection and the Science of Happiness,” The Journal of Happiness Studies, 8: 99–138. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2008a). “Happiness, the Self, and Human Flourishing,” Utilitas, 20(1): 21–49. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2008b). “Philosophy and the Science of Subjective Well-Being,” The Science of Subjective Well-Being, M. Eid and R. J. Larsen (eds.). New York: Guilford Press: 17-43. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2008c). The Pursuit of Unhappiness: The Elusive Psychology of Well-Being, New York, Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Haybron, D. M. (2010). “Mood Propensity as a Constituent of Happiness: A Rejoinder to Hill,” The Journal of Happiness Studies, 11: 19–31. (Scholar)
  • Headey, B. (2007). The Set-Point Theory of Well-Being Needs Replacing: On the Brink of a Scientific Revolution?, DIW Berlin: German Institute for Economic Research. (Scholar)
  • Headey, B. (2008). “The Set-Point Theory of Well-Being: Negative Results and Consequent Revisions,” Social Indicators Research, 85(3): 389-403. (Scholar)
  • Hsee, C. K. and R. Hastie (2006). “Decision and experience: Why don't we choose what makes us happy?Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10(1): 31–37. (Scholar)
  • Hurka, T. (2010). The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Huxley, A. (1932 [2005]). Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited, New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics.
  • Inglehart, R., R. Foa, C. Peterson and C. Welzel (2008). “Development, freedom, and rising happiness: A global perspective (1981–2007),” Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3(4): 264–285. (Scholar)
  • Inglehart, R. and H.-D. Klingemann (2000). “Genes, Culture, Democracy, and Happiness,” Culture and Subjective Well-Being, E. Diener and E. M. Suh (eds.), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press: 165-183. (Scholar)
  • Kagan, S. (1992). “The Limits of Well-Being,” Social Philosophy and Policy, 9(2): 169-89. (Scholar)
  • Kagan, S. (1994). “Me and My Life,” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 94: 309–324. (Scholar)
  • Kahneman, D. (1999). “Objective Happiness,” Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology, D. Kahneman, E. Diener and N. Schwarz (eds.), New York: Russell Sage Foundation: 3-25. (Scholar)
  • Kahneman, D. and A. Deaton (2010). “High income improves evaluation of life but not emotional well-being,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(38): 16489-16493. (Scholar)
  • Kahneman, D., E. Diener and N. Schwarz, Eds. (1999). Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology, New York: Russell Sage Foundation Press. (Scholar)
  • Kahneman, D., B. L. Fredrickson, C. A. Schreiber and D. A. Redelmeier (1993). “When More Pain Is Preferred to Less: Adding a Better End,” Psychological Science, 4(6): 401–405. (Scholar)
  • Kahneman, D. and A. Tversky, Eds. (2000). Choices, Values, and Frames, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kekes, J. (1982). “Happiness,” Mind, 91: 358–76. (Scholar)
  • Kekes, J. (1988). The Examined Life, Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kekes, J. (1992). “Happiness,” Encyclopedia of Ethics, L. C. Becker and C. B. Becker (eds.), New York: Garland: 430–435. (Scholar)
  • Kellert, S. R. and E. O. Wilson, Eds. (1995). The Biophilia Hypothesis, Washington, D.C.: Island Press. (Scholar)
  • Kelman, M. (2005). “Hedonic Psychology and the Ambiguities of ‘Welfare’,” Philosophy & Public Affairs, 33(4): 391–412. (Scholar)
  • Kenny, A. and C. Kenny (2006). Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Utility, Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic. (Scholar)
  • Keyes, C. L. (2002). “The mental health continuum: From languishing to flourishing in life,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 43(2): 207–222. (Scholar)
  • Kraut, R. (1979). “Two Conceptions of Happiness,” The Philosophical Review, 138: 167–97. (Scholar)
  • Krueger, A., D. Kahneman, C. Fischler, D. Schkade, N. Schwarz and A. Stone (2009). “Time Use and Subjective Well-Being in France and the U.S,” Social Indicators Research(93): 7-18. (Scholar)
  • Larsen, R. J. and Z. Prizmic (2008). “Regulation of Emotional Well-Being: Overcoming the Hedonic Treadmill,” The Science of Subjective Well-Being, M. Eid and R. J. Larsen (eds.), New York: Guilford Press: 258-289. (Scholar)
  • Layard, R. (2005). Happiness: Lessons from a new science, New York: Penguin. (Scholar)
  • Loewenstein, G. and E. Haisley (2008). “The Economist as Therapist: Methodological Ramifications of ‘Light’ Paternalism,” The Foundations of Positive and Normative Economics, A. Caplin and A. Schotter (eds.), New York: Oxford University Press, 210–248. (Scholar)
  • Lucas, R. E. (2008). “Personality and Subjective Well-Being,” The Science of Subjective Well-Being, M. Eid and R. J. Larsen (eds.), New York: Guilford Press: 171-194. (Scholar)
  • Lucas, R. E., A. E. Clark, Y. Georgellis and E. Diener (2004a). “Re-Examining Adaptation and the Setpoint Model of Happiness: Reactions to Changes in Marital Status,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84: 527-539. (Scholar)
  • Lucas, R. E., A. E. Clark, Y. Georgellis and E. Diener (2004b). “Unemployment alters the set point for life satisfaction,” Psychological Science, 15(1): 8–13. (Scholar)
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  • Lyubomirsky, S. (2007). The How of Happiness, New York: Penguin. (Scholar)
  • Lyubomirsky, S., L. King and E. Diener (2005). “The Benefits of Frequent Positive Affect: Does Happiness Lead to Success?” Psychological Bulletin, 131(6): 803–855. (Scholar)
  • Lyubomirsky, S., K. M. Sheldon and D. Schkade (2005). “Pursuing Happiness: The Architecture of Sustainable Change,” Review of General Psychology, 9(2): 111–131. (Scholar)
  • Mayerfeld, J. (1996). “The Moral Asymmetry of Happiness and Suffering,” Southern Journal of Philosophy, 34: 317–338. (Scholar)
  • Mayerfeld, J. (1999). Suffering and Moral Responsibility, New York: Oxford. (Scholar)
  • McFall, L. (1989). Happiness, New York: Peter Lang. (Scholar)
  • McMahon, D. M. (2005). Happiness: A History, New York: Atlantic Monthly Press. (Scholar)
  • Meynell, H. (1969). “Human Flourishing,” Religious Studies, 5: 147–154. (Scholar)
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  • Montague, R. (1967). “Happiness,” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 67: 87–102. (Scholar)
  • Morris, S. (2011). “In defense of the hedonistic account of happiness,” Philosophical Psychology, 24(2): 261 – 281. (Scholar)
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  • Myers, D. G. and E. Diener (1995). “Who Is Happy?” Psychological Science, 6(1): 10–19. (Scholar)
  • Nettle, D. (2005). Happiness: The Science Behind Your Smile, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
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  • Seligman, M. (2002). Authentic Happiness, New York: Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Seligman, M. (2011). Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being, New York: Simon & Schuster. (Scholar)
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  • Sidgwick, H. (1907/1966). The Methods of Ethics, New York: Dover Publications. (Scholar)
  • Silventoinen, K., S. Sammalisto, M. Perola, D. I. Boomsma, B. K. Cornes, C. Davis, L. Dunkel, M. De Lange, J. R. Harris and J. V. B. Hjelmborg (2003). “Heritability of adult body height: a comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries,” Twin Research, 6(5): 399–408. (Scholar)
  • Singer, P. (1972). “Famine, Affluence, and Morality,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 1(3): 229–243. (Scholar)
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