Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Hate Speech" by Luvell Anderson and Michael Barnes

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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  • Anderson, Elizabeth, and Richard Pildes, 2000, “Expressive Theories of Law: A General Restatement,” University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 148: 1503–1575. (Scholar)
  • Anderson Luvell and Lepore, Ernest, 2013a, “Slurring Words,” Noûs, 47(1): 25–48. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013b, “What Did You Call Me? Slurs as Prohibited Words,” Analytic Philosophy, 54(3): 350–363. (Scholar)
  • Appiah, Kwame Anthony, 2012, “What’s Wrong with Defamation of Religion?” in Michael Herz, and Peter Molnar (eds.), The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Response, Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 164–182. (Scholar)
  • Ashwell, Lauren, 2016, “Gendered Slurs,” Social Theory and Practice, 42(2): 228–39. (Scholar)
  • Austin. J. L., 1962, How to do Things with Words, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Bach, Kent, 2018, “Loaded Words: On the Semantics and Pragmatics of Slurs,” in David Sosa (ed.), Bad Words: Philosophical Perspectives on Slurs, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 60–76. (Scholar)
  • Baker, C. Edwin, 2012, “Hate Speech,” in Michael Herz, and Peter Molnar (eds.), The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Response, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 57–80. (Scholar)
  • Bauer, Nancy, 2015, How to Do Things with Pornography, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Beauharnais v. People of the State of Illinois, 343 U.S. 250 (1952).
  • Behrens,Paul, Terry, N. and Jensen, O (eds.), 2017, Holocaust and Genocide Denial: A Contextual Perspective, Abingdon; New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. (Scholar)
  • Bolinger, Renée Jorgensen, 2017, “The Pragmatics of Slurs,” Noûs, 51(3): 439–462. (Scholar)
  • Brandenburg v. Ohio, 395 U.S. 444 (1969).
  • Brandom, Robert, 1994, Making it Explicit, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brown, Alexander, 2017a, “What Is Hate Speech? Part 1: The Myth of Hate,” Law and Philosophy, 36(4): 419–468. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017b, “What Is Hate Speech? Part 2: Family Resemblances,” Law and Philosophy, 36(5): 561–613. (Scholar)
  • Brison, Susan, 1998a, “The Autonomy Defense of Free Speech,” Ethics, 108(2): 312–339. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998b, “Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence,” Legal Theory, 4: 39–61. (Scholar)
  • Butler, Judith, 1997, Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Camp, Elisabeth, 2013, “Slurring Perspectives,” Analytic Philosophy, 54(3): 330–349. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “Slurs as Dual-Act Expressions,” in David Sosa (ed.), Bad Words, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 29–59. (Scholar)
  • Caponetto, Laura, 2021, “A Comprehensive Definition of Illocutionary Silencing,” Topoi, 40: 191–202. (Scholar)
  • Cepollaro, Bianca, 2015, “In Defense of a Presuppositional Account of Slurs,” Language Sciences, 52: 36–45. (Scholar)
  • Croom, Adam, 2011, “Slurs,” Language Sciences, 33: 343–358. (Scholar)
  • Delgado, Richard, 1993, “Words that Wound: A Tort Action for Racial Insults, Epithets, and Name Calling,” in Mari Matsuda, Charles Lawrence III, Richard Delgado, and Kimberlé Crenshaw (eds.), Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 89–110. (Scholar)
  • Delgado, Richard, and Jean Stefancic, 2004, Understanding Words that Wound, Boulder, CO: Westview Press. (Scholar)
  • Dummett, Michael, 1993, Frege: Philosophy of Language, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gallie, W. B., 1955, “Essentially Contested Concepts,” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 56: 167–198. (Scholar)
  • Gelber, Katharine, 2012a, “Reconceptualizing Counterspeech in Hate-Speech Policy (with a Focus on Australia),” in Michael Herz, and Peter Molnar (eds.), The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Response, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 198–216. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012b, “‘Speaking Back’: The Likely Fate of Hate Speech Policy in the United States and Australia,” in Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech & Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 50–71. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Hate Speech—Definitions & Empirical Evidence,” Constitutional Commentary, 32(3): 619–629. (Scholar)
  • Gelber, Katharine, and Luke McNamara, 2016, “Evidencing the Harms of Hate Speech,” Social Identities, 22 (3): 324–341. (Scholar)
  • Herz, Michael, and Peter Molnar (eds.), 2012, The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Responses, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hesni, Samia, 2018, “Illocutionary Frustration,” Mind, 127(508): 947–976. (Scholar)
  • Heyman, Steven, 2008, Free Speech and Human Dignity, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hom, Christopher, 2008, “The Semantics of Racial Epithets,” Journal of Philosophy, 105: 416–440. (Scholar)
  • Hornsby, Jennifer, 1994, “Illocution and its Significance,” in Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), Foundations of Speech Act Theory: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives, London: Routledge, pp. 187–207. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, “Meaning and Uselessness: How to Think About Derogatory Words,” Midwest Studies in Philosophy, 25(1): 128 – 141. (Scholar)
  • Hornsby, Jennifer, and Rae Langton, 1998, “Free Speech and Illocution,” Legal Theory, 4: 21–37. (Scholar)
  • Imbleau, Martin, 2011, “Denial of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity,” in Ludovic Hennebel and Thomas Hochmann (eds.) Genocide Denials and the Law, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 235–277. (Scholar)
  • Jeshion, Robin, 2013a, “Expressivism and the Offensiveness of Slurs,” Philosophical Perspectives, 27: 231–259. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013b, “Slurs and Stereotypes,” Analytic Philosophy, 54 (3): 314–329. (Scholar)
  • Khoo, Justin, 2017, “Code Words in Political Discourse,” Philosophical Topics, 45 (2): 33–64. (Scholar)
  • Kirk-Giannini, Cameron Domenico, 2019, “Slurs are Directives,” Philosopher’s Imprint, 19(48): 1–28. (Scholar)
  • Kukla, Quill [writing as Rebecca], 2014, “Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice,” Hypatia, 29 (2): 440–457. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “Slurs, Interpellation, and Ideology,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 56(S1): 7–32. (Scholar)
  • Langton, Rae, 1993, “Speech Acts and Unspeakable Acts,” Philosophy & Public Affairs, 22(4): 293–330. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, “Beyond Belief: Pragmatics in Hate Speech and Pornography,” in Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech & Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 72–93. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018a, “The Authority of Hate Speech,” in John Gardner, Leslie Green, and Brian Leiter (eds.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law (Volume 3), New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 123–152. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018b, “Blocking as Counter Speech,” in Daniel W. Harris Daniel Fogal, and Matt Moss (eds.), New Works on Speech Acts, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 144–164. (Scholar)
  • Langton Rae, and Caroline West, 1999, “Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 77(3): 303–319. (Scholar)
  • Lawrence, Charles III, 1993, “If He Hollers Let Him Go: Regulating Racist Speech on Campus,” in Mari Matsuda, Charles Lawrence III, Richard Delgado, and Kimberlé Crenshaw (eds.), Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 53–88. (Scholar)
  • Haney Lopez, Ian, 2014, Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • MacKinnon, Catharine, 1993, Only Words, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Maitra, Ishani, 2009, “Silencing Speech,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 39(2): 309–338. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, “Subordinating Speech,” in Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech & Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 94–120. (Scholar)
  • Maitra, Ishani, and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), 2012, Speech & Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Matsuda, Mari, 1993, “Public Response to Racist Speech: Considering the Victim’s Story,” in Mari Matsuda, Charles Lawrence III, Richard Delgado, and Kimberlé Crenshaw (eds.), Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 17–51. (Scholar)
  • Matsuda, Mari, Charles Lawrence III, Richard Delgado, and Kimberlé Crenshaw (eds.), 1993, Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment, Boulder, CO: Westview Press. (Scholar)
  • McGowan, Mary Kate, 2004, “Conversational Exercitives: Something Else We Do With Our Words,” Linguistics and Philosophy, 27: 93–111. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “Oppressive Speech,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 87(3): 389–407. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, “On ‘Whites Only’ Signs and Racist Hate Speech: Verbal Acts of Racial Discrimination,” in Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech & Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 121–47. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, “Sincerity Silencing,” Hypatia, 29(2): 458–473. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “On Covert Exercitives: Speech and the Social World,” in Daniel W. Harris Daniel Fogal, and Matt Moss (eds.), New Works on Speech Acts, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 185–201. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, Just Words: On Speech and Hidden Harm, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • McGowan, Mary Kate, and Ishani Maitra, 2009, “On Racist Hate Speech and the Scope of a Free Speech Principle,” Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence, 23(2): 343–372. (Scholar)
  • Mendelberg, Tali, 2001, The Race Card: Campaign Strategy, Implicit Messages, and the Norm of Equality, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mikkola, Mari, 2011, “Illocution, Silencing and the Act of Refusal,” Pacific Philosophy Quarterly, 92: 415–437. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, Pornography: a Philosophical Introduction, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15 (1973).
  • Neufeld, Eleonore, 2019, “An Essentialist Theory of the Meaning of Slurs,” Philosopher’s Imprint, 19(35): 1–29. (Scholar)
  • Nunberg, Geoff, 2018, “The Social Life of Slurs,” in Daniel W. Harris, Daniel Fogal, and Matt Moss (eds.), New Works on Speech Acts, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 237–295. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 2000, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Capabilities as Fundamental Entitlements: Sen and Social Justice,” Feminist Economics, 9(2/3): 33–59. (Scholar)
  • O’Donnell, Patrick, 2017, “Generics, Race, and Social Perspectives,” Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy, published online 26 January 2017. doi:10.1080/00207543.2016.1266801 (Scholar)
  • Parekh, Bhikhu, 2012, “Is There a Case for Banning Hate Speech?” in Michael Herz, and Peter Molnar (eds.), The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Response, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 37–56. (Scholar)
  • Popa-Wyatt, Mihaela, and Jeremy L. Wyatt, 2017, “Slurs, Roles and Power,” Philosophical Studies, 175(11): 2879–2906. (Scholar)
  • Post, Robert, 2009, “Hate Speech,” in Ivan Hare and James Weinstein (eds.), Extreme Speech and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Reichman, Ammon, 2009, “Criminalizing Religiously Offensive Satire: Free Speech, Human Dignity, and Comparative Law,” in Ivan Hare and James Weinstein (eds.), Extreme Speech and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 331–355. (Scholar)
  • Richard, Mark, 2010, When Truth Gives Out, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Saul, Jennifer M., 2018, “Dogwhistles, Political Manipulation, and Philosophy of Language,” in Daniel W. Harris Daniel Fogal, and Matt Moss (eds.), New Works on Speech Acts, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 360–383. (Scholar)
  • Sbisà, Marina, 2009, “Illocution and Silencing,” in Bruce Fraser, and Ken Turner (eds.), Language in Life, and a Life in Language: Jacob Mey—a Festschrift, Bradford: Emerald, pp. 351–357. (Scholar)
  • Schwartzman, Lisa H., 2002, “Hate Speech, Illocution, and Social Context: A Critique of Judith Butler,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 33(3): 421–441. (Scholar)
  • Sen, Amartya, 1992, Inequality Reexamined, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Stanley, Jason, 2015, How Propaganda Works, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Steinberger, Florian, and Julien Murzi, 2017, “Inferentialism,” in Bob Hale, Crispin Wright, Alexander Miller (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Language, second edition, Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, pp. 197–224. (Scholar)
  • Tesler, M., and D. O. Sears, 2010, Obama’s Race: The 2008 Election and the Dream of a Post-Racial America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Tirrell, Lynne, 1999, “Derogatory Terms: Racism, Sexism, and the Inferential Role Theory of Meaning,” in Christina Hendricks, and Kelly Oliver (eds.), Language and Liberation: Feminism, Philosophy, and Language, Albany: State University of New York Press, pp. 41–79. (Scholar)
  • Tonhauser, Judith, 2012, “Diagnosing (not-)at-issue content,” Proceedings of Semantics of Underrepresented Languages in the Americas, 6: 239–254. (Scholar)
  • UN General Assembly, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 16 December 1966.
  • UN General Assembly, International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, 21 December 1965, [available online].
  • Waldron, Jeremy,2014, The Harm in Hate Speech, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • West, Caroline, 2012, “Words that Silence? Freedom of Expression and Racist Hate Speech,” in Ishani Maitra, and Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech and Harm: Controversies over Free Speech, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 222–248. (Scholar)
  • Whine, Michael, 2009, “Expanding Holocaust Denial and Legislation Against It,” in Ivan Hare and James Weinstein (eds.), Extreme Speech and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 538–556. (Scholar)
  • White, Ismail, 2007, “When Race Matters and When It Doesn’t: Racial Group Differences in Response to Racial Cues,” American Political Science Review, 101(2): 339–54. (Scholar)
  • Whiting, Daniel, 2008, “Conservatives and Racists: Inferential Role Semantics and Pejoratives,” Philosophia, 36(3): 375–388. (Scholar)
  • Williamson, Timothy, 2009, “Reference, Inference, and the Semantics of Pejoratives,” in J. Almog, and P. Leonardi (eds.), The Philosophy of David Kaplan, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 137–158. (Scholar)
  • Wistrich, Robert, 2012, Holocaust Denial: The Politics of Perfidy, Berlin: De Gruyter. (Scholar)

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