Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Implicit Bias" by Michael Brownstein

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  • Aberson, C., M. Porter, & A. Gaffney, 2008, “Friendships predict Hispanic student’s implicit attitudes toward Whites relative to African Americans”, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 30: 544–556. (Scholar)
  • Ajzen, I., & M. Fishbein, 1977, “Attitude-behavior relations: A theoretical analysis and review of empirical research,” Psychological Bulletin, 84: 888–918. (Scholar)
  • Allport, G., 1954, The Nature of Prejudice, Reading: Addison-Wesley. (Scholar)
  • Amodio, D. & P. Devine, 2006, “Stereotyping and evaluation in implicit race bias: evidence for independent constructs and unique effects on behavior”, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91(4): 652. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “On the interpersonal functions of implicit stereotyping and evaluative race bias: Insights from social neuroscience”, in Attitudes: Insights from the new wave of implicit measures, R. Petty, R. Fazio, & P. Briñol (eds.), Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, pp. 193–226. (Scholar)
  • Amodio, D. & K. Ratner, 2011, “A memory systems model of implicit social cognition”, Current Directions in Psychological Science, 20(3): 143–148.
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  • Antony, L., 2016, “Bias: friend or foe? Reflections on Saulish Skepticism”, in Brownstein & Saul (eds.) 2016A. (Scholar)
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  • Bandura, A., 1978, “The self system in reciprocal determinism,” American Psychologist, 33: 344–358. Banks, R. R., & R.T. Ford, 2008, “(How) Does Unconscious Bias Matter: law, Politics, and Racial Inequality,” Emory LJ, 58: 1053–1152. (Scholar)
  • Banse, R., J. Seise, & N. Zerbes, 2001, “Implicit attitudes towards homosexuality: Reliability, validity, and controllability of the IAT”, Zeitschrift für Experimentelle Psychologie, 48: 145–160. (Scholar)
  • Bar-Anan, Y. & B. Nosek, 2014, “A Comparative Investigation of Seven Implicit Measures of Social Cognition”, Behavior Research Methods, 46(3): 668–688. doi:10.3758/s13428-013-0410-6 (Scholar)
  • Bargh, J., 1994, “The four horsemen of automaticity: Awareness, intention, efficiency, and control in social cognition”, in Handbook of social cognition (2nd ed.), R. Wyer, Jr. & T. Srull (eds.), Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., pp 1–40. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “The cognitive monster: The case against the controllability of automatic stereotype effects”, in Chaiken & Trope (eds.) 1999: 361–382. (Scholar)
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  • Beeghly, E., 2014, Seeing Difference: The Epistemology and Ethics of Stereotyping, PhD diss., University of California, Berkeley, California. (Scholar)
  • Beeghly, E. & A. Madva, forthcoming, An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Begby, E., 2013, “The Epistemology of Prejudice”, Thought: A Journal of Philosophy, 2(2): 90–99. (Scholar)
  • Berger, J., forthcoming, “Implicit attitudes and awareness,” Synthese, first online 14 March 2018. doi:10.1007/s11229-018-1754-3 (Scholar)
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  • Bertrand, M. & S. Mullainathan, 2004, “Are Emily and Greg more employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A field experiment on labor market”, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., No. 9873. (Scholar)
  • Blanton, H., & E.G. Ikizer, 2019, “Elegant Science Narratives and Unintended Influences: An Agenda for the Science of Science Communication,” Social Issues and Policy Review, 13(1): 154–181. (Scholar)
  • Blair, I., J. Ma, & A. Lenton, 2001, “Imagining Stereotypes Away: The Moderation of Implicit Stereotypes through Mental Imagery”, Journal of personality and social psychology, 81(5): 828–841. (Scholar)
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  • Bodenhausen, G. & B. Gawronski, 2014, “Attitude Change”, in The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Psychology, D. Reisberg (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brennan, S., 2013, “Rethinking the Moral Significance of Micro-Inequities: The Case of Women in Philosophy”, in Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?, F. Jenkins and K. Hutchinson (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brewer, M., 1999, “The psychology of prejudice: Ingroup love and outgroup hate?”, Journal of social issues, 55(3): 429–444. (Scholar)
  • Brownstein, M., 2016a, “Attributionism and moral responsibility for implicit bias, Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 7(4): 765–786. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016b, “Implicit Bias, Context, and Character”, in Brownstein & Saul (eds.) 2016B. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, The Implicit Mind: Cognitive Architecture, the Self, and Ethics, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, forthcoming, “Skepticism about Bias,” in Beeghly & Madva (eds.), forthcoming. (Scholar)
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  • –––, 2012b, “The Normativity of Automaticity”, Mind and Language, 27(4): 410–434. (Scholar)
  • Brownstein, M., Madva, A., & Gawronski, B., 2019, “What do implicit measures measure?,” WIREs Cognitive Science. doi:10.1002/wcs.1501 (Scholar)
  • Brownstein, M. & J. Saul (eds.), 2016A, Implicit Bias & Philosophy: Volume I, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (eds.), 2016B, Implicit Bias and Philosophy: Volume 2, Moral Responsibility, Structural Injustice, and Ethics, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Buckwalter, W., forthcoming, “Implicit attitudes and the ability argument,” Philosophical Studies, first online 15 September 2018. doi:10.1007/s11098-018-1159-7 [available online] (Scholar)
  • Byrd, N., forthcoming, “What we can (and can’t) infer about implicit bias from debiasing experiments,” Synthese, first online 12 February 2019. doi:10.1007/s11229-019-02128-6 (Scholar)
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  • Carruthers, P., 2009, “How we know our own minds: the relationship between mindreading and metacognition”, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32: 121–138. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “On knowing your own beliefs: A representationalist account,” in N. Nottelmann (ed.), New essays on belief: Constitution, content and structure, pp. 145– 165, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.Center for Policing Equity, 2016, [available online]. (Scholar)
  • Cervone, D. Caldwell, T. L., & N.D. Mayer, 2015, “Personality systems and the coherence of social behavior,” In. B. Gawronski & G. V. Bodenhausen (Eds.), Theory and explanation in social psychology, pp. 157–179, New York: Guilford. (Scholar)
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  • Conrey, F., J. Sherman, B. Gawronski, K. Hugenberg, & C. Groom, 2005, “Separating multiple processes in implicit social cognition: The Quad-Model of implicit task performance”, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89: 469–487. (Scholar)
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  • Correll, J., Wittenbrink, B., Crawford, M., & M. Sadler, 2015, “Stereotypic Vision: How Stereotypes Disambiguate Visual Stimuli,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108(2): 219–233. (Scholar)
  • Cortina, L., 2008, “Unseen injustice: Incivility as modern discrimination in organizations”, Academy of Management Review, 33: 55–75. (Scholar)
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  • Cunningham, W. & P. Zelazo, 2007, “Attitudes and evaluations: A social cognitive neuroscience perspective”, Trends in cognitive sciences, 11(3): 97–104. (Scholar)
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  • Dasgupta, N. & A. Greenwald, 2001, “On the malleability of automatic attitudes: Combating automatic prejudice with images of admired and disliked individuals”, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81: 800–814. (Scholar)
  • Dasgupta, N. & L. Rivera, 2008, “When social context matters: The influence of long-term contact and short-term exposure to admired group members on implicit attitudes and behavioral intentions”, Social Cognition, 26: 112–123. (Scholar)
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  • Gawronski, B., R. Deutsch, S. Mbirkou, B. Seibt, & F. Strack, 2008, “When ‘Just Say No’ is not enough: Affirmation versus negation training and the reduction of automatic stereotype activation”, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44: 370–377. (Scholar)
  • Gawronski, B. & A. Hahn, 2019, “Implicit Measures: Procedures, Use, and Interpretation,” in Measurement in Social Psychology, Blanton, H., LaCroix, J.M., and G.D. Webster (eds.), New York: Taylor & Francis, 29–55. (Scholar)
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  • Gendler, T., 2008a, “Alief and belief”, The Journal of Philosophy, 105(10): 634–663. (Scholar)
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  • Hehman, E., Flake, J. K., & J. Calanchini, J., 2017, “Disproportionate use of lethal force in policing is associated with regional racial biases of residents,” Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550617711229. (Scholar)
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  • Hermanson, S., 2017a, “Implicit Bias, Stereotype Threat, and Political Correctness in Philosophy,” Philosophies, 2(2): 12. doi:10.3390/philosophies2020012 [available online]. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017b, “Review of Implicit Bias and Philosophy (vol. 1 & 2), Edited by Michael Brownstein and Jennifer Saul, Oxford University Press, 2016,” The Journal of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, 315—322. (Scholar)
  • Helton, G., forthcoming, “If you can’t change what you believe, you don’t believe it,” Nous, first online 26 August 2018. doi:10.1111/nous.12265 (Scholar)
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  • Hofmann, W., Gawronski, B., Gschwendner, T., Le, H., & M. Schmitt, 2005, “A meta-analysis on the correlation between the Implicit Association Test and explicit self-report measures,” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31(10): 1369–1385. (Scholar)
  • Holroyd, J., 2012, “Responsibility for Implicit Bias”, Journal of Social Philosophy, 43(3): 274–306. (Scholar)
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  • Holroyd, J. & J. Sweetman, 2016, “The Heterogeneity of Implicit Biases”, in Brownstein & Saul (eds.) 2016A. (Scholar)
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