Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Japanese Confucian Philosophy" by John Tucker

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Abe, Yoshio, 1965. Nihon Shushigaku to Chōsen, Tōkyō: Tōkyō daigaku shuppansha. (Scholar)
  • Ansart, Oliver, 1998. L’empire du rite: La pensée politique d’Ogyū Sorai, Japan, 1666–1728, Geneva: Droz.
  • Bellah, Robert, 1985. Tokugawa Religion: The Cultural Roots of Modern Japan, New York: The Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Boot, W. J., 1983. The Adoption and Adaptation of Neo-Confucianism in Japan: The Role of Fujiwara Seika and Hayashi Razan, Leiden. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012. Critical Readings in the Intellectual History of Early Modern Japan, Leiden: E. J. Brill. (Scholar)
  • Collcutt, Martin, 1991. “The Confucian Legacy in Japan,” in Gilbert Rozman, ed. The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage and Its Modern Adaptation, Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 111–154. (Scholar)
  • De Bary, William Theodore, Carol Gluck, and Arthur E. Tiedemann (eds.), 2002. Sources of Japanese Tradition, 1600–2000, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • De Bary, William Theodore, Carol Gluck, Arthur E. Tiedemann, and Irene Bloom (eds.), 1979. Principle and Practicality: Essays in Neo-Confucianism and Practical Learning, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Dilworth, David, Valdo H. Viglielmo, and Agustin Jacinto Zavala (eds.), 1998. Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. (Scholar)
  • Dore, Ronald, 1984. Education in Tokugawa Japan, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies. (Scholar)
  • Dufourmont, Eddy, 2010. “Is Confucianism Philosophy? The Answers of Inoue Tetsujirō and Nakae Chōmin.” Whither Japanese Philosophy? Reflections Through Other Eyes, Tōkyō: University of Tōkyō Center for Philosophy (UTCP Booklet 14). (Scholar)
  • Harootunian, H. D., 1970. Toward Restoration: The Growth of Political Consciousness in Tokugawa Japan, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988. Things Seen and Unseen: Discourse and Ideology in Tokugawa Nativism, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W., 2004. Japanese Philosophy Abroad, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W., Thomas P. Kasulis, and John C. Maraldo (eds.), 2011. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Inoue, Tetsujirō, 1905. Nippon Shushigakuha no tetsugaku, Tōkyō: Fuzanbō. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1902. Nippon Kogakuha no tetsugaku, Tōkyō: Fuzanbō. (Scholar)
  • Joly, Jacques, 1996. Le naturel selon Andō Shōeki, Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. (Scholar)
  • Koschmann, J. Victor (ed.), 1978. Authority and the Individual in Japan: Citizen Protest in Historical Perspective, Tōkyō: University of Tōkyō Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987. The Mito Ideology: Discourse, Reform, and Insurrection in Late Tokugawa Japan, 1790–1864, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Koyasu, Nobukuni, 1998. Edo shisō shi kōgi, Tōkyō: Iwanami shoten. (Scholar)
  • Kurozumi, Makoto and Herman Ooms, 1994. “The Nature of Early Tokugawa Confucianism,” Journal of Japanese Studies, 20(2): 331–375. (Scholar)
  • Lidin, Olof G., 1973. The Life of Ogyū Sorai: A Tokugawa Confucian Philosopher, Lund: Studentlitteratur. (Scholar)
  • Lam, Wing-Keung, 2011. “The Making of ‘Japanese Philosophy’: Nishi Amane, Nakae Chōmin, Nishida Kitarō,” Whither Japanese Philosophy? Reflections from Other Eyes, Tōkyō: University of Tōkyō Center for Philosophy (UTCP Booklet 19). (Scholar)
  • Maruyama, Masao, 1974. Studies in the Intellectual History of Tokugawa Japan, Mikiso Hane, trans. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • McEwan, J. R., 1962. The Political Writings of Ogyū Sorai, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • McMullen, Ian James, 1999. Idealism, Protest, and The Tale of Genji : The Confucianism of Kumazawa Banzan (1619–91), New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Minamoto, Ryōen, 1986. Jitsugaku shisō no keifu, Tōkyō: Kōdansha. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988. Edo no Jugaku: Daigaku no jūyō no rekishi, Tōkyō: Shibunkaku shuppan. (Scholar)
  • Moore, Charles A., 1967. The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Najita, Tetsuo, 1978. Japanese Thought in the Tokugawa Period, 1600–1868: Methods and Metaphors, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987. Visions of Virtue in Tokugawa Japan: The Kaitokudō Merchant Academy of Osaka, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998. Tokugawa Political Writings, Cambridge: University of Cambridge Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008. Doing思想史, Tōkyō: Misuzu shobō. (Scholar)
  • Nakajima, Takahiro. 2017. “Confucianism in Modern Japan.” Michiko Yusa, ed. The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy. New York: Bloomsbury Academic. (Scholar)
  • Nishi, Junzō, Abe Ryūichi, and Maruyama Masao, eds. 1980. Yamazaki Ansai gakuha, Tōkyō: Iwanami shoten. (Scholar)
  • Nosco, Peter, 1984. Confucianism and Tokugawa Culture, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990. Remembering Paradise: Nativism and Nostalgia in Eighteenth-Century Japan, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ooms, Herman, 1985. Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570–1680, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Paramore, Kiri, 2009. Ideology and Christianity in Japan, London: Routledge Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016. Japanese Confucianism: A Cultural History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Piovesana, Gino K., 1997. Recent Japanese Philosophical Thought, 1862–1996: A Survey, Richmond, Surrey: Curzon Press. (Scholar)
  • Reitan, Richard M., 2010. Making a Moral Society: Ethics and the State in Meiji Japan, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Sawada, Janine, 1993. Confucian Values and Popular Zen: Sekimon Shingaku in Eighteenth-Century Japan, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004. Practical Pursuits: Religion, Politics, and Personal Cultivation in Nineteenth-Century Japan, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Smits, Gregory, 1999. Visions of Ryukyu: Identity and Ideology in Early-Modern Thought and Politics, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Spae, Joseph John, 1948. Itō Jinsai: A Philosopher, Educator, and Sinologist of the Tokugawa Period, Beijing: Catholic University Press; reprinted, New York: Paragon Book Company, 1967. (Scholar)
  • Steben, Barry, 2014. “Orthodoxy and Legitimacy in the Yamazaki Ansai School,” in Chun-chieh Huang and John A. Tucker, eds., Dao Companion to Japanese Confucian Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer. 331–410. (Scholar)
  • Takayanagi, Nobuo, 2011. “Japan’s ‘Isolated Father’ of Philosophy: Nishi Amane and His ‘Tetsugaku’”, Whither Japanese Philosophy? Reflections from Other Eyes, Tōkyō: University of Tokyo Center for Philosophy (UTCP Booklet 19). (Scholar)
  • Tucker, John A., 1998. Itō Jinsai’s Gomō jigi and the Philosophical Definition of Early-Modern Japan, Leiden: E. J. Brill. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006. Ogyū Sorai’s Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendō and Benmei, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, ed., 2013. Critical Readings on Japanese Confucianism, Volume One: History; Volume Two: Philosophy; Volume Three: Religion; Volume Four: Translations, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013. “Dreams, Nightmares, and Green Reflections on Kurosawa and Confucian Humanism,” in Ishii Tsuyoshi and Lam Wing-keung, eds. APF Series 1: Philosophizing in Asia (UTCP-Uehiro Booklet 3), Tōkyō: University of Tōkyō Center for Philosophy, 47–92. (Scholar)
  • ––– and Chun-chieh Huang, eds., 2014. Dao Companion to Japanese Confucian Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017. “Philosophy after Fukushima: Generative Force, Nationalism, and the Global Environmental Imperative,” Keynote Presentation at the International Association for Japanese Philosophy Conference on Globalizing Japanese Philosophy from East Asia to the World, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan. (Scholar)
  • Tucker, Mary Evelyn, 1989. Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism: The Life and Thought of Kaibara Ekken (1630–1714), Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, ed., 1998. Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans, Cambridge: Harvard University Center for the Study of World Religions. (Scholar)
  • ––– and Tu Weiming, eds., 2003. Confucian Spirituality, New York: Crossroad Publishing Company. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007. The Philosohy of Qi: The Record of Great Doubts, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Uno Seiichi, 1988. Jukyō shisō, Tōkyō: Kōdansha. (Scholar)
  • Wajima, Yoshio, 1988. Nihon Sō gaku shi no kenkyū, Tōkyō: Yoshikawa kobunkan. (Scholar)
  • Watanabe, Hiroshi, 2010. Nihon seiji shisō shi, 17–20 seiki, Tōkyō: University of Tōkyō Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012. A History of Japanese Political Thought, 1600–1901, David Noble, trans. Tōkyō: International House of Japan. (Scholar)
  • Yamashita, Samuel Hideo, 1994. Master Sorai’s Responsals: An Annotated Translation of Sorai sensei tōmonsho. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Yoshikawa, Kojirō, 1983. Jinsai, Sorai, Norinaga: Three Classical Philologists of Mid-Tokugawa Japan, Tōkyō: Tōhō gakkai. (Scholar)

Generated Sun Aug 14 10:09:27 2022