Linked bibliography for the SEP article "The Kyoto School" by Bret W. Davis

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Works Cited

Abbreviations Used in this Article

  • NKC Nishitani Keiji chosakushū [Collected Works of Nishitani Keiji], Tokyo: Sōbunsha, 1986–95. (Volume numbers are given in Roman numerals.)
  • NKZ Nishida Kitarō zenshū [Complete Works of Nishida Kitarō], Tokyo: Iwanami, 1987–89. (Volume numbers are given in Roman numerals.)
  • THZ Tanabe Hajime zenshū [Complete Works of Tanabe Hajime], Tokyo: Chikuma Shobō, 1964. (Volume numbers are given in Roman numerals.)
  • USS Ueda Shizuteru shū [Collected Writings of Ueda Shizuteru], Tokyo: Iwanami, 2001–2003. (Volume numbers are given in Roman numerals.)

Other Sources Cited in this Article

  • Akizuki, Ryōmin, 1996, Zettai-mu to basho: Suzuki-zengaku to Nishida-tetsugaku [Absolute Nothingness and Place: Suzuki’s Zen Studies and Nishida’s Philosophy], Tokyo: Seishisha. (Scholar)
  • Arisaka, Yoko, 1996, “The Nishida Enigma: ‘The Principle of the New World Order’,” Monumenta Nipponica, 51/1: 81–106. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Beyond East and West: Nishida’s Universalism and Postcolonial Critique,” in Border Crossings: Toward a Comparative Political Theory, Fred Dallmayr (ed.), New York: Lexington Books. (Scholar)
  • Aristotle, 1973, Introduction to Aristotle, second edition, Richard McKeon (ed.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Bercholz, Samuel and Sherab Chödzin Kohn (eds.), 1993, The Buddha and His Teachings, Boston: Shambhala. (Scholar)
  • Bouso, Raquel and James W. Heisig (eds.), 2009, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • Buchner, Harmut (ed.), 1989, Japan und Heidegger, Sigmaringen: Thorbecke. (Scholar)
  • Cleary, J. C. (trans.), 1999, Wumen’s Gate, in Three Zen Classics, Berkeley: Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research. (Scholar)
  • Cobb, John B. Jr. and Christopher Ives (eds.), 1990, The Emptying God: A Buddhist-Jewish-Christian Conversation with Masao Abe on God, Kenosis, and Sunyata, Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books. (Scholar)
  • Dale, Peter, 1986, The Myth of Japanese Uniqueness, New York: St. Martin’s Press. (Scholar)
  • Dalissier, Michel, 2009, “Nishida Kitarō and Chinese Philosophy,” in Lam & Cheung (eds.) 2009, pp. 211–250. (Scholar)
  • Dallmayr, Fred, 1993, “Heidegger and Zen Buddhism: a Salute to Nishitani Keiji,” in The Other Heidegger, Fred Dallmayr, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, pp. 200–226. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, Beyond Orientalism, Albany: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • Davis, Bret W., 2002, “Introducing the Kyoto School as World Philosophy: Reflections on James. W. Heisig’s Philosophers of Nothingness,” The Eastern Buddhist, 34/2: 142–170. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004a, “The Step Back through Nihilism: The Radical Orientation of Nishitani Keiji’s Philosophy of Zen,” Synthesis Philosophica 37: 139–59. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004b, “Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen,” in Heisig 2004, pp. 246–274. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008a, “Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru’s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism,” in Hori & Curley 2008, pp. 221–250. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008b, “Turns to and from Political Philosophy: The Case of Nishitani Keiji,” in Goto-Jones 2008, pp. 26–45. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011a, “Nishitani after Nietzsche: From the Death of God to the Great Death of the Will,” in Davis & Schroeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 82–101. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011b, “Nothingness and (not or) the Individual: Reflections on Robert Wilkinson’s Nishida and Western Philosophy,” The Eastern Buddhist, 42/2: 143–156. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013a, “Forms of Emptiness in Zen,” in Steven Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 190–213. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013b, “Nishida’s Multicultural Worldview: Contemporary Significance and Immanent Critique,” Nishida Tetsugakkai Nenpō [The Journal of the Society for Nishida Philosophy], 10: 183–203. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013d, “Heidegger and Asian Philosophy,” in François Raffoul and Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 459–471. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, “Ethical and Religious Alterity: Nishida after Levinas,” in Elberfeld & Arisaka 2014, pp. 313–341. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Encounter in Emptiness: The I-Thou Relation in Nishitani Keiji’s Philosophy of Zen,” in Yusa (ed.) 2017, pp. 231–254. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019a, “Expressing Experience: Language in Ueda Shizuteru’s Philosophy of Zen,” in Gereon Kopf (ed.), Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist Philosophy, New York: Springer. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2019b, The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Davis, Bret W., Brian Schroeder and Jason M. Wirth (eds.), 2011, Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Denker, Alfred et al. (eds.), 2013, Heidegger-Jahrbuch 7: Heidegger und das ostasiatische Denken, Freiburg & Munich: Alber Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Derrida, Jacques, 1992, The Other Heading: Reflections on Today’s Europe, Pascale-Anne Brault and Michael B. Naas (trans.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Döll, Steffen, 2011, “Ueda Shizuteru’s Phenomenology of Self and World: Critical Dialogues with Descartes, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty,” in Davis & Schroeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 120–137. (Scholar)
  • Eckehart, Meister, 1963, Deutsche Predigten und Traktate, Josef Quint (ed. and trans.), München: Carl Hanser. (Scholar)
  • Elberfeld, Rolf, 1999, Kitarō Nishida (1870–1945). Moderne japanische Philosophie und die Frage nach der Interkulturalität, Amsterdam: Rodopi. (Compellingly argues for Nishida’s significance as a cross-cultural philosopher.) (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • Elberfeld, Rolf and Yōko Arisaka (eds.), 2014, Kitarō Nishida in der Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts, Freiburg & Munich: Alber Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Faure, Bernard, 1995, “The Kyoto School and Reverse Orientalism,” in Japan in Traditional and Postmodern Perspectives, Charles Wei-Hsun Fu and Steven Heine (eds.), New York: SUNY Press, pp. 245–281. (Scholar)
  • Feenberg, Andrew, 1995, “The Problem of Modernity in Nishida’s Philosophy,” in Alternative Modernity, Andrew Feenberg, Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 169–192. (Scholar)
  • Franck, Fredrick (ed.), 2004, The Buddha Eye: An Anthology of the Kyoto School, Bloomington: World Wisdom. (Scholar)
  • Friedländer, Paul, 1969, Plato: An Introduction, second edition, Hans Meyerhoff (trans.), Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fujita, Masakatsu (ed.), 2001, Kyōtogakuha no tetsugaku [The Philosophy of the Kyoto School], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Logos and Pathos: Miki Kiyoshi’s Logic of the Imagination,” Bret W. Davis with Moritsu Ryū and Takehana Yōsuke (trans.), in Davis & Schroeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 305–318. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “The Significance of Japanese Philosophy,” Bret W. Davis (trans.), Journal of Japanese Philosophy, 1: 5–20. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2018, The Philosophy of the Kyoto School, Robert Chapeskie with John W. M. Krummel (trans.), Singapore: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Fujita, Masakatsu, et al. (eds.), 2003, Higashiajia to tetsugaku [East Asia and Philosophy], Kyoto: Nakanishiya Press. (Scholar)
  • Fujita, Masakatsu and Bret W. Davis (eds.), 2005, Sekai no naka no nihon no tetsugaku [Japanese Philosophy in the World], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (Scholar)
  • Fukuyama, Francis, 1992, The End of History and the Last Man, New York: The Free Press. (Scholar)
  • Gadamer, Hans-Georg, 1989, Das Erbe Europas, Frankfurt: Suhrkamp. (Scholar)
  • Garfield, Jay L., 1995, The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Goto-Jones, Christopher S., 2002, “If not a clash, then what? Huntington, Nishida Kitarō, and the politics of civilizations,” International Relations of the Asian Pacific, 2: 223–43. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2008, Re-politicising the Kyoto School as Philosophy, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “The Kyoto School, the Cambridge School, and the History of Political Philosophy in Wartime Japan,” Positions, 17/1: 13–42. (Scholar)
  • Habermas, Jürgen, 1979, Communication and the Evolution of Society, Thomas McCarthy (trans.), Boston: Beacon Press. (Scholar)
  • Harootunian, Harry, 2000, Overcome by Modernity: History, Culture, and Community in Interwar Japan. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hattori, Kenji, 2004, “‘Kyōtogakuha-saha’ zō” [The Image of the “Left-Wing of the Kyoto School”], in Ōhashi 2004, pp. 23–43. (Scholar)
  • Heidegger, Martin, 1956, Was ist das—die Philosophie?, Pfullingen: Neske. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1975ff., Gesamtausgabe, Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann.
  • Heisig, James W., 1994, “Tanabe’s Logic of the Specific and the Spirit of Nationalism,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994, pp. 255–288. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Philosophers of Nothingness: An Essay on the Kyoto School, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2004, Japanese Philosophy Abroad, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2006, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W., Thomas P. Kasulis and John C. Maraldo (eds.), 2011, Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook, Honolulu: Hawai‘i University Press. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W. and John C. Maraldo (eds.), 1994, Rude Awakenings: Zen, The Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W. and Uehara Mayuko (eds.), 2008, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 3: Origins and Possibilities, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • Himi, Kiyoshi, 1990, Tanabe-tetsugaku kenkyū: Shūkyōgaku no kanten kara [Studies in the Philosophy of Tanabe: From the Perspective of Religious Studies], Tokyo: Hokujushuppan. (Scholar)
  • Hiromatsu, Wataru, 1989, “Kindai no chōkoku”-ron [Theories on “Overcoming Modernity”], Tokyo: Kōdansha. (Scholar)
  • Hisamatsu Shin’ichi, 1960, “The Characteristics of Oriental Nothingness,” Richard DeMartino (trans.), Philosophical Studies of Japan, 2: 65–97.
  • Hori, Victor Sōgen and Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), 2008, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 3: Origins and Possibilities, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Horio, Tsutomu, 1994, “The Chūōkōron Discussions, Their Background and Meaning,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994, pp. 289–315. (Scholar)
  • Ives, Christopher (ed.), 1995, Divine Emptiness and Historical Fullness: A Buddhist-Jewish-Christian Conversation with Masao Abe, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: Trinity Press International. (Scholar)
  • Izutsu, Toshihiko (trans.), 2001, Lao-tzu: The Way and Its Virtue, Tokyo: Keio University Press. (A bilingual edition) (Scholar)
  • Jacinto Zavala, Agustín, 2001, “On Some Elements of the Concept of Basho,” Dokkyo International Review, 14: 119–134. (Scholar)
  • Kasulis, T. P., 1981, Zen Action/Zen Person, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, Engaging Japanese Philosophy: A Short History, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Kawakami, Tetsutarō, Takeuchi Yoshimi et al., 1979, Kindai no chōkoku [The Overcoming of Modernity], Sendai: Fuzanbō. (Scholar)
  • Kenneth K. Inada, 1993, Nāgārjuna: A Translation of his Mūlamadhyamakakārikā with an Introductory Essay, Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications. (Scholar)
  • Kopf, Gereon, 2004, “Between Identity and Difference: Three Ways of Reading Nishida’s Non-Dualism,” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, 31/1: 73–103. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Ambiguity, Diversity, and an Ethics of Understanding: What Nishida’s Philosophy Can Contribute to the Pluralism Debate,” Culture and Dialogue, 1/1: 21–44. (Scholar)
  • Kōsaka, Masaaki, Nishitani Keiji, Kōyama Iwao, and Suzuki Shigetaka, 1943, Sekaishi-teki tachiba to Nihon [The World-Historical Standpoint and Japan], Tokyo: Chūōkōronsha. (Scholar)
  • Krummel, John W. M., 2012, “Basho, World, and Dialectics: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nishida Kitarō,” in Nishida 2012a, pp. 3–48. (Scholar)
  • Krummel, John W. M., 2015, Nishida Kitarō’s Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic, Dialectic of Place, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lai, Whalen, 1990, “Tanabe and the Dialectics of Mediation: A Critique,” in The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime, Taitetsu Unno and James W. Heisig (eds.), Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press, pp. 256–276. (Scholar)
  • Lam, Wing-keung and Cheung Ching-yuen (eds.), 2009, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • Maraldo, John, 1995, “The Problem of World Culture: Towards an Appropriation of Nishida’s Philosophy of Nation and Culture,” The Eastern Buddhist, 28/2: 183–197. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Defining Philosophy in the Making,” in Heisig 2004, pp. 220–245. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Ōbei no shiten kara mita Kyōtogakuha no yurai to yukue” [The Whence and Whither of the Kyoto School from a Western Perspective], Azumi Yurika (trans.), in Fujita & Davis 2005, pp. 31–56. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “The War Over the Kyoto School,” Monumenta Nipponica, 61/3 (Autumn 2006): 375–401. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “Japanese Philosophy as a Lens on Greco-European Thought,” Journal of Japanese Philosophy, 1: 21–56. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • Minamoto, Ryōen, 1994, “The Symposium on ‘Overcoming Modernity’,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994. (Scholar)
  • Najita, Tetsuo and H. D. Harootunian, 1998, “Japan’s Revolt against the West,” in Modern Japanese Thought, Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 207–272. (Scholar)
  • Nakamura, Hajime (ed.), 1975, Bukkyō-go daijiten [Large Dictionary of Buddhist Terms], Tokyo: Tōkyōshoseki. (Scholar)
  • Nakamura, Yūjirō, 1983, Nishida Kitarō, Tokyo: Iwanami. (Scholar)
  • Nishida, Kitarō, 1958, Intelligibility and the Philosophy of Nothingness, Robert Schinzinger (trans.), Honolulu: East-West Center Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1964, “The Problem of Japanese Culture,” Masao Abe (trans.), in Sources of Japanese Tradition, Vol. 2, Ryusaku Tsunoda et al. (eds.), New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 350–365. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1970, Fundamental Problems of Philosophy, David A. Dilworth (trans.), Tokyo: Sophia University Press. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Last Writings: Nothingness and the Religious Worldview, David A. Dilworth (trans.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, An Inquiry into the Good, Masao Abe and Christopher Ives (trans.), New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012a, Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitarō, John W. M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo (trans.), Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Nishimura, Eshin (ed.), 1994, Mumonkan [The Gateless Barrier], Tokyo: Iwanami. (Scholar)
  • Nishitani, Keiji, 1982, Religion and Nothingness, Jan Van Bragt (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, The Self-Overcoming of Nihilism, Graham Parkes with Setsuko Aihara (trans.), Albany: SUNY. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, Nishida Kitarō, Yamamoto Seisaku and James W. Heisig (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “The I-Thou Relation in Zen Buddhism,” in Franck 2004, pp. 29–53. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, On Buddhism, Seisaku Yamamoto and Robert E. Carter (trans.), Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Ōhashi, Ryōsuke, 1984, Zeitlichkeitsanalyse der Hegelschen Logik. Zur Idee einer Phänomenologie des Ortes, Munich: Karl Alber. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1990, revised edition 2012, Die Philosophie der Kyōto-Schule, Freiburg: Karl Alber. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, Nihon-tekina mono, Yōroppa-tekina mono [Things Japanese, Things European], Tokyo: Shinchōsha. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Kyōtogakuha to Nihon-kaigun [The Kyoto School and the Japanese Navy], Kyoto: PHP Shinsho. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2004, Kyōtogakuha no shisō [The Thought of the Kyoto School], Kyoto: Jinbunshoin. (Scholar)
  • Ōshima, Yasuma, 2000, “Daitōasensō to Kyōtogakuha: Chishikijin no seijisanka ni tsuite” [The Pacific War and the Kyoto School: On the Political Participation of Intellectuals], in Sekaishi no riron: Kyōtogakuha no rekishigaku ronkō [Theory of World History: The Kyoto School’s Writings on History], Mori Tetsurō (ed.), Kyoto: Tōeisha, pp. 274–304. (Scholar)
  • Panikkar, K. M., 1969, Asia and Western Dominance, Collier Books. (Scholar)
  • Parkes, Graham, 1884, “Nietzsche and Nishitani on the Self through Time,” The Eastern Buddhist, 17/2: 55–74. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1987, Heidegger and Asian Thought, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, “Nietzsche and East Asian Thought: Influences, Impacts, and Resonances,” in The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche, Bernd Magnus and Kathleen M. Higgins (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 356–383. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, “The Putative Fascism of the Kyoto School and the Political Correctness of the Modern Academy,” Philosophy East and West, 47/3: 305–336. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Heidegger and Japanese Fascism: An Unsubstantiated Connection,” in Davis & Schroeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 247–265. (Scholar)
  • Plato, 1961, The Collected Dialogues of Plato, Edith Hamilton and Huntington Cairns (eds.), Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Said, Edward, 1978, Orientalism, New York: Vintage Books. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993, Culture and Imperialism, New York: Vintage Books. (Scholar)
  • Schürmann, Reiner, 1978, Meister Eckhart: Mystic and Philosopher, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sugimoto, Kōichi, 2011, “Tanabe Hajime’s Logic of Species and the Philosophy of Nishida Kitarō: A Critical Dialogue within the Kyoto School,” in Davis & Schroeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 52–67. (Scholar)
  • Synthesis Philosophica, 37, 2004, Zagreb, Croatia. (A special issue devoted to “Japanese Philosophy.”) (Scholar)
  • Takeuchi, Yoshinori, 1999, Takeuchi Yoshinori chosakushū [Collected Works of Takeuchi Yoshinori], Kyoto: Hōzōkan. (Scholar)
  • Tanabe, Hajime, 1986, Philosophy as Metanoetics, Takeuchi Yoshinori (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000, Zangedō toshite no tetsugaku – Shi no tetsugaku [Philosophy as the Way of Metanoetics, The Philosophy of Death], Hase Shōtō (ed.), Kyoto: Tōeisha. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Shūkyōtetsugaku no kadai to zentei” [The Tasks and Presuppositions of the Philosophy of Religion], in Bukkyō to seiyōtetsugaku [Buddhism and Western Philosophy], Tanabe Hajime, Kosaka Kunitsugu (ed.), Tokyo: Kobushibunko, pp. 9–42. (Scholar)
  • Ueda, Shizuteru, 1991, Ikiru to iu koto: keiken to jikaku [What is Called Life: Experience and Self-Awareness], Kyoto: Jinbunshoin. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994, “Nishida, Nationalism, and the War in Question,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994, pp. 77–106. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, “Nishitani Keiji: Shūkyō to hishūkyō no aida” [Nishitani Keiji: Between Religion and Non-Religion], in Shūkyō to hishūkyō no aida [Between Religion and Non-Religion], Nishitani Keiji, Ueda Shizuteru (ed.), Tokyo: Iwanami, pp. 287–316. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011a, “Contributions to Dialogue with the Kyoto School,” Bret W. Davis (trans.), in Davis &Schoeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 19–32. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011b, “Language in a Twofold World,” Bret W. Davis (trans.), in Heisig & Kasulis & Maraldo 2011, pp. 765–784. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011c, Wer und was bin ich: Zur Phänomenologie des Selbst im Zen-Buddhismus, Freiburg: Verlag Karl Alber. (Scholar)
  • Ueda, Yoshifumi, 1990, “Tanabe’s Metanoetics and Shinran’s Thought,” in The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime, Taitetsu Unno and James W. Heisig (eds.), Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press, pp. 134–149. (Scholar)
  • Wagner, Rudolf G., 2003, A Chinese Reading of the Daodejing: Wang Bi’s Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Commentary, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Wargo, Robert J. J., 2005, The Logic of Nothingness: A Study of Nishida Kitarō, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Watson, Burton, 1968, The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wilkinson, Robert, 2009, Nishida and Western Philosophy, Surrey, UK: Ashgate. (Scholar)
  • Williams, Paul, 1989, Mahāyāna Buddhism: The Doctrinal Foundations, London/New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Yusa, Michiko, 1994, “Nishida and Totalitarianism: A Philosopher’s Resistance,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994, pp. 107–131. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2017, The Bloombury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy, New York: Bloomsbury. (Scholar)
  • Zhang, Dainian, 2002, Key Concepts in Chinese Philosophy, Edmund Ryden (trans.), New Haven and London: Yale University Press. (Scholar)

Selected Kyoto School Works available in English and other Western languages

Anthologies containing works by more than one Kyoto School author

The texts contained in these anthologies are not listed here separately. (For a complete list of Western language translations of works by Nishida, Tanabe, Nishitani, Takeuchi, and Ueda, see the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture website listed below.)

  • Dilworth, David A. and Valdo H. Viglielmo with Agustín Jacinto Zavala (eds.), 1998, Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents. Westport: Greenwood Press. (A valuable anthology containing translations of selected works by Nishida, Tanabe, Kuki, Watsuji, Miki, Tosaka, and Nishitani, together with helpful editorial material.) (Scholar)
  • Frank, Fredrick (ed.), 2004 (first edition 1982), The Buddha Eye: An Anthology of the Kyoto School, Bloomington: World Wisdom. (While somewhat misnamed as an anthology of the Kyoto School, this collection does include a good selection of essays by Nishitani, Ueda, and other modern Japanese religious thinkers.) (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W., Thomas P. Kasulis and John C. Maraldo (eds.), 2011, Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (This encyclopedic anthology contains a selection of representative works by all members of, and thinkers affiliated with, the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Jacinto Zavala, Augustín (ed.), 1995, Textos de la filosofía japonesa, Michoacán: El Colegio de Michoacán. (Scholar)
  • Ōhashi, Ryōsuke (ed.), 1990, revised edition 2012, Die Philosophie der Kyōto-Schule, Freiburg: Karl Alber. (This landmark anthology contains valuable introductions by the editor, as well as German translations of key essays by Nishida, Tanabe, Hisamatsu, Nishitani, Kōyama Iwao, Kōsaka Masaaki, Shimomura Toratarō, Suzuki Shigetaka, Takeuchi Yoshinori, Tsujimura Kōichi, and Ueda Shizuteru.) (Scholar)

Other Kyoto School Works

  • Abe, Masao, 1985, Zen and Western Thought, William R. LaFleur (ed.), London: Macmillan Press (published in North America by University of Hawai‘i Press). (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “Kenotic God and Dynamic Sunyata,” in The Emptying God: A Buddhist-Jewish-Christian Conversation with Masao Abe on God, Kenosis, and Sunyata, John B. Cobb, Jr. and Christopher Ives (eds.), Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books, pp. 3–65. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, Zen and Comparative Studies, Steven Heine (ed.), London: Macmillan Press (published in North America by University of Hawai‘i Press). (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, Zen and the Modern World, Steven Heine (ed.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Includes Abe’s articles on Nishida.) (Scholar)
  • Hisamatsu, Shin’ichi, 1960, “The Characteristics of Oriental Nothingness,” Richard DeMartino (trans.), Philosophical Studies of Japan, 2: 65–97.
  • –––, 2002, Critical Sermons of the Zen Tradition, Christopher Ives and Tokiwa Gishin (ed. and trans.), New York: Palgrave. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982, Zen and the Fine Arts, Gishin Tokiwa (trans.), Tokyo: Kodansha. (Scholar)
  • Kuki, Shūzō, 2004, A Philosopher’s Poetry and Poetics, Michael F. Marra (trans. and ed.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, The Stucture of Iki, in The Structure of Detachment: The Aesthetic Vision of Kuki Shūzō, Hiroshi Nara (ed.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Nishida, Kitarō, 1958, Intelligibility and the Philosophy of Nothingness, Robert Schinzinger (trans.), Honolulu: East-West Center Press. (Contains translations of three important essays.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1964, “The Problem of Japanese Culture,” Masao Abe (trans.), in Sources of Japanese Tradition, Vol. 2, Ryusaku Tsunoda et al. (eds.), New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 350–365. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1970, Fundamental Problems of Philosophy, David A. Dilworth (trans.), Tokyo: Sophia University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1973, Art and Morality, David A. Dilworth (trans.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1986, “The Logic of Topos and the Religious Worldview,” Michiko Yusa (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 19/2: 1–29 & 20/1: 81–119. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Intuition and Reflection in Self-Consciousness, Valdo Viglielmo et al. (trans.), New York, SUNY. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Last Writings: Nothingness and the Religious Worldview, David A. Dilworth (trans.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar) (Contains a translation of “The Logic of Place and the Religious World-view” as well as introductory and critical essays by the translator.)
  • –––, 1990, An Inquiry into the Good, Masao Abe and Christopher Ives (trans.), New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, La culture japonaise en question, Pierre Lavelle (trans.), Paris: Publications Orientalistes de France. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, Logik des Ortes. Der Anfang der modernen Philosophie in Japan, Rolf Elberfeld (trans.), Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. (Contains translations of Nishida’s prefaces to his books and of three of his key essays.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, Logique du lieu et vision religieuse de monde, Sugimura Yasuhiko and Sylvain Cardonnel (trans.), Paris: Editions Osiris. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “General Summary” from The System of Self-Consciousness of the Universal, in Robert J. J., Wargo, The Logic of Nothingness: A Study of Nishida Kitarō, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, pp. 186–216. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012a, Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitarō, John W. M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo (trans.), Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar) (Contains translations of “Basho” [Place] and “Logic and Life” as well as an insightful and informative introduction by John Krummel.)
  • –––, 2012b, Ontology of Production, William Haver (trans.), Durham and London: Duke University Press. (Contains translations of “Expressive Activity,” “The Standpoint of Active Intuition,” and “Human Being.”) (Scholar)
  • Nishitani, Keiji, 1982, Religion and Nothingness, Jan Van Bragt (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1984, “The Standpoint of Zen,” John C. Maraldo (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 18/1: 1–26. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1986, Was is Religion?, Dora Fischer-Barnicol (trans.), Frankfurt: Insel Verlag. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, The Self-Overcoming of Nihilism, Graham Parkes with Setsuko Aihara (trans.), Albany: SUNY. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, Nishida Kitarō, Yamamoto Seisaku and James W. Heisig (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Emptiness and Sameness,” in Modern Japanese Aesthetics, Michele Marra (ed.), Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, La religión y la nada, Raquel Bouso García (trans.), Madrid: Ediciones Siruela. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, On Buddhism, Seisaku Yamamoto and Robert E. Carter (trans.), Albany: SUNY. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, The Philosophy of Nishitani Keiji 1900-1990: Lectures on Religion and Modernity, Jonathan Morris Augustine and Seisaku Yamamoto (trans.), Lewiston: The Edwin Mellen Press. (Scholar)
  • Takeuchi, Yoshinori, 1983, The Heart of Buddhism, James W. Heisig (ed. and trans.), New York: Crossroad. (Scholar)
  • Tanabe, Hajime, 1959, “Todesdialektik,” in Martin Heidegger zum siebzigsten Geburtstag: Festschrift, Günther Neske (ed.), Pfullingen: Neske, pp. 93–133. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1969, “The Logic of Species as Dialectics,” David Dilworth and Satō Taira (trans.), Monumenta Nipponica, 24/3: 273–88. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1986, Philosophy as Metanoetics, Takeuchi Yoshinori (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Ueda, Shizuteru, 1965, Die Gottesgeburt in der Seele und der Durchbruch zu Gott. Die mystische Anthropologie Meister Eckharts und ihre Konfrontation mit der Mystik des Zen Buddhismus. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus Gerd Mohn. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982, “Emptiness and Fullness: Śūnyatā in Mahāyāna Buddhism,” James W. Heisig and Frederick Greiner (trans), The Eastern Buddhist, 15/1: 9–37. (Outlines many of the contours of Ueda’s understanding of Zen by way of interpreting the Ten Oxherding Pictures.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983a, “Ascent and Descent: Zen Buddhism in Comparison with Meister Eckhart (Part 1),” James W. Heisig (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 16/1: 52–73. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983b, “Ascent and Descent: Zen Buddhism in Comparison with Meister Eckhart (Part 2),” Ian Astly and James W. Heisig (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 16/2: 72–91. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989, “The Zen Buddhist Experience of the Truly Beautiful,” John C. Maraldo (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 22/1: 1–36. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “Freedom and Language in Meister Eckhart and Zen Buddhism (Part One),” Richard F. Szippl (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 23/2: 18–59. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991, “Freedom and Language in Meister Eckhart and Zen Buddhism (Part Two),” Richard F. Szippl (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 24/1: 52–80. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, “The Place of Man in the Noh Play,” Paul Shepherd (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 25/2: 59–88. (In the first part of this essay, Ueda outlines his account of “living-in-the-double-world.”) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993a, “Zen and Philosophy in the Thought of Nishida Kitarō,” Mark Unno (trans.), Japanese Religions, 18/2: 162–193. (Examines Nishida’s early attempt to develop a philosophy of pure experience on the basis of his practice of Zen.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993b, “Pure Experience, Self-Awareness, ‘Basho’,” Etudes Phénoménologiques, 18: 63–86. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994a, “The Practice of Zen,” Ron Hadley and Thomas L. Kirchner (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 27/1: 10–29. (Succinctly introduces Ueda’s interpretation of the practice of Zen.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994b, “Nishida, Nationalism, and the War in Question,” in Heisig & Maraldo 1994, pp. 77–106. (Ueda’s influential response to the controversy surrounding Nishida’s political writings.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “Nishida’s Thought,” Jan Van Bragt (trans.), The Eastern Buddhist, 28/1: 29–47. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, Zen y la filosofia, Raquel Bouso (ed.), Barcelona: Editorial Herder. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011a, “Contributions to Dialogue with the Kyoto School,” Bret W. Davis (trans.), in Davis & Schoeder & Wirth 2011, pp. 19–32. (In this essay composed especially for this volume, Ueda reflects on the problem of nihilism in an age of globalization and on the contributions to a global philosophical dialogue made by Nishida’s philosophy of “absolute nothingness” and Nishitani’s philosophy of “emptiness.”) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011b, “Language in a Twofold World,” Bret W. Davis (trans.), in Heisig & Kasulis & Maraldo 2011, pp. 765–784. (Scholar) (Based on texts originally written in 1990 and 1997, Ueda prepared this essay to represent his thought in this first comprehensive sourcebook of Japanese philosophy.)
  • –––, 2011c, Wer und was bin ich: Zur Phänomenologie des Selbst im Zen-Buddhismus, Freiburg: Verlag Karl Alber. (Scholar) (A valuable collection of some of Ueda’s essays written in German. Earlier versions of the first four chapters are available in English translation in Ueda 1982, 1989, 1992, and 1983a. For a review of this book and overview of Ueda’s thought, see Davis 2013g).
  • Watsuji, Tetsurō, 1988, Climate and Culture: A Philosophical Study, Geoffrey Bownas (trans.), New York: Greenwood Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, Watsuji Tetsurō’s Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan, Yamamoto Seisaku and Robert Carter (trans.), Albany: SUNY Press. (Scholar)

Further Reading

Special Issues of Journals

  • Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie, 36/3, 2011. (A special issue devoted to Nishida’s philosophy.)
  • The Eastern Buddhist New Series, 25/1, 1992. (A special edition, “In Memoriam Nishitani Keiji 1900–1990.”)
  • The Eastern Buddhist New Series, 28/2, 1995. (A “Nishida Kitarō Memorial Issue.”)
  • Études phénoménologique, 18, 1993. (A special issue devoted to “L’école de Kyōto.”)
  • Journal of Japanese Philosophy, 1, 2013. (The first issue of this new journal contains articles that treat Kyoto School philosophers, as will presumably subsequent issues.)
  • Revue philosophique de Louvain, 1994 (no. 4, Novembre). (A special issue devoted to the theme: “La réception européenne de l’école de Kyōto.”)
  • Synthesis Philosophica, 37, 2004, Zagreb, Croatia. (A special issue devoted to “Japanese Philosophy,” with articles in German, English, and French, many of which are written by leading Japanese scholars of the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Zen Buddhism Today, 14, 1997. (An important collection of articles on the theme: “Religion and the Contemporary World in Light of Nishitani Keiji’s Thought.”)
  • Zen Buddhism Today, 15, 1998. (An important collection of articles on the theme: “Nishida’s Philosophy, Nishitani’s Philosophy, and Zen.”)

Other Works

  • Abe, Masao, 1997, “Buddhism in Japan,” in Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy, Brian Carr and Indira Mahalingam (eds.), London and New York: Routledge, pp. 746–791. (Provides an overview of the history of Japanese Buddhism, ending with D. T. Suzuki as a modern Buddhist thinker and Nishida as a Buddhism-inspired philosopher.) (Scholar)
  • Arisaka, Yoko, 1999, “Beyond East and West: Nishida’s Universalism and Postcolonial Critique,” in Border Crossings: Toward a Comparative Political Theory, Fred Dallmayr (ed.), New York: Lexington Books, pp. 237–252. (An insightful critical treatment of the ambiguities in Nishida’s cultural and political philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • Berque, Augustin (ed.), 2000, Logique du lieu et dépassemente de la modernité, two volumes, Bruxelles: Ousia. (Scholar)
  • Bouso, Raquel and James W. Heisig (eds.), 2009, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Bowers, Russell H. Jr., 1995, Someone or Nothing: Nishitani’s “Religion and Nothingness” as a Foundation for Christian-Buddhist Dialogue, New York: Peter Lang. (Scholar)
  • Buchner, Harmut (ed.), 1989, Japan und Heidegger, Sigmaringen: Thorbecke. (Contains documents of, and essays about, the relation between Heidegger and the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Buri, Fritz, 1997, The Buddha-Christ as the Lord of the True Self: The Religious Philosophy of the Kyoto School and Christianity, Macon: Mercer University Press. (Scholar)
  • Carter, Robert E., 1997, The Nothingness Beyond God: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nishida Kitarō, second edition, St. Paul: Paragon House. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, The Kyoto School: An Introduction, with a foreword by Thomas P. Kasulis, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Calichman, Richard F. (ed. and trans.), 2008, Overcoming Modernity: Cultural Identity in Wartime Japan, New York: Columbia University Press. (Contains an introduction to and translation of the 1942 symposium on "Overcoming Modernity" in which Nishitani Keiji and other Kyoto School affiliated philosophers participated.) (Scholar)
  • Cobb, John B. Jr. and Christopher Ives (eds.), 1990, The Emptying God: A Buddhist-Jewish-Christian Conversation with Masao Abe on God, Kenosis, and Sunyata, Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books. (Scholar)
  • Dale, Peter, 1986, The Myth of Japanese Uniqueness, New York: St. Martin’s Press. (A highly critical study of Japanese cultural nationalism.) (Scholar)
  • Dalissier, Michel, 2009, “Nishida Kitarō and Chinese Philosophy,” in Lam & Cheung, pp. 211–250. (An intriguing account of Nishida’s study of classical Chinese philosophy and the influence it exerted on his thought.) (Scholar)
  • Davis, Bret W., 2002, “Introducing the Kyoto School as World Philosophy: Reflections on James. W. Heisig’s Philosophers of Nothingness,” The Eastern Buddhist, 34/2: 142–170. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “The Step Back through Nihilism: The Radical Orientation of Nishitani Keiji’s Philosophy of Zen,” Synthesis Philosophica, 37: 139–59. (An introduction to the central themes of Nishitani’s thought, focusing on his topological phenomenology of a “trans-descendence” through nihilism to the “field of śūnyatā.”) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen,” in Heisig 2004, pp. 246–274. (Addresses the relation between “philosophy” and “religion” in the Kyoto School, and argues that Nishida and others provoke us to radically rethink both of these terms as well as the relation between them.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru’s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism,” in Hori & Curley 2008, pp. 221–250. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Turns to and from Political Philosophy: The Case of Nishitani Keiji,” in Goto-Jones 2008, pp. 26–45. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Nothingness and (not or) the Individual: Reflections on Robert Wilkinson’s Nishida and Western Philosophy,” The Eastern Buddhist, 42/2: 143–156. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “Nishida’s Multicultural Worldview: Contemporary Significance and Immanent Critique,” Nishida Tetsugakkai Nenpō [The Journal of the Society for Nishida Philosophy], 10: 183–203. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2019, The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Contains chapters on all the major Kyoto School philosophers by leading scholars in the field.) (Scholar)
  • Davis, Bret W., Brian Schroeder and Jason M. Wirth (eds.), 2011, Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (A collection of essays by North American, Japanese, and European scholars aimed at engendering multilateral exchanges between the Kyoto School philosophies and such Continental figures as Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Arendt, Löwith, Habermas, Merleau-Ponty, Irigaray, Levinas, Derrida, and Marion.) (Scholar)
  • Denker, Alfred et al. (eds.), 2013, Heidegger-Jahrbuch 7: Heidegger und das ostasiatische Denken, Freiburg & Munich: Alber Verlag. (Scholar) (Contains a number of essays by and on thinkers affiliated with the Kyoto School.)
  • Döll, Steffen, 2005, Wozu also suchen? Zur Einführung in das Denken von Ueda Shizuteru, Munich: iudicium. (Contains a scholarly and informative introduction to Ueda’s thought, together with an annotated translation of his “The Place of Self-Awareness.”) (Scholar)
  • Elberfeld, Rolf, 1999, Kitarō Nishida (1870–1945). Moderne japanische Philosophie und die Frage nach der Interkulturalität, Amsterdam: Rodopi. (Compellingly argues for Nishida’s significance as a cross-cultural philosopher.) (Scholar)
  • Elberfeld, Rolf and Yōko Arisaka (eds.), 2014, Kitarō Nishida in der Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts, Freiburg & Munich: Alber Verlag. (Scholar) (Contains a rich variety of essays by Japanese, European, and American scholars on Nishida in the context of twentieth century philosophy.)
  • Faure, Bernard, 1995, “The Kyoto School and Reverse Orientalism,” in Japan in Traditional and Postmodern Perspectives, Charles Wei-Hsun Fu and Steven Heine (eds.), New York: SUNY Press. (A severely critical treatment of the nationalistic aspects of the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Fujita, Masakatsu (ed.), 1997, Nihon kindai shisō o manabu hito no tame ni [For Students of Modern Japanese Thought], Kyoto: Sekaishisōsha. (Contains helpful introductory chapters on members of the Kyoto School and other key thinkers in modern Japan.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998, Gendaishisō toshite no Nishida Kitarō [Nishida Kitarō as Contemporary Thought], Tokyo: Kōdansha. (An introduction to Nishida, focusing on the idea of pure experience, the critique of dualism, and the question of language in his early writings.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2000ff., Nihon no tetsugaku [Japanese Philosophy], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (An annual journal published by the Department of Japanese Philosophy at Kyoto University.)
  • ––– (ed.), 2001, Kyōtogakuha no tetsugaku [The Philosophy of the Kyoto School], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (Contains primary texts from, and critical essays on, eight Kyoto School philosophers.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, Nishida Kitarō no shisaku-sekai [The World of Nishida Kitarō’s Thought], Tokyo: Iwanami. (Gathers ten lucid and insightful essays on a range of key issues in Nishida’s philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, Nihon tetsugaku-shi [The History of Japanese Philosophy], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (Based on two decades of lectures on the history of modern Japanese philosophy at Kyoto University by one of the leading contemporary scholars in the field.) (Scholar)
  • Fujita, Masakatsu and Bret W. Davis (eds.), 2005, Sekai no naka no nihon no tetsugaku [Japanese Philosophy in the World], Kyoto: Shōwadō. (Scholar) (A collection of articles by Western, Chinese and Japanese scholars attempting to hermeneutically situate and critically evaluate the significance of modern Japanese philosophy in the world.)
  • Goto-Jones, Christopher S., 2005, Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity, London: Routledge. (A provocative new interpretation of the political dimensions of Nishida’s philosophy, which argues that Nishida’s political thought should be understood neither in terms of Japanese ultranationalism, nor in terms of Western liberalism, but rather as a modern development of Eastern and in particular Mahāyāna Buddhist thought.) (Scholar)
  • Hanaoka, Eiko, 2009, Zen and Christianity: From the Standpoint of Absolute Nothingness, Kyoto: Maruzen. (Scholar)
  • Hase, Shōtō, 2003, Yokubō no tetsugaku: Jōdokyou sekai no shisaku [Philosophy of Desire: An Inquiry into the World of Pure Land Buddhism], Kyoto: Hōzōkan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, Kokoro ni utsuru mugen: kū no imāju-ka [The Infinite Reflected in the Heart-Mind: The Imaging of Emptiness], Kyoto: Hōzōkan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010, Jōdo to wa nanika: Shinran no shisaku to do ni okeru chōetsu [What is the Pure Land? The Thought of Shinran and Transcendence on Earth], Kyoto: Hōzōkan. (Scholar)
  • Hashi, Hisaki, 1999, Die Aktualität der Philosophie. Grundriss des Denkwegs der Kyoto-Schule, Wien: Doppelpunkt. (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W., 1998, “Kyoto School,” in E. Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Philosophy as Spirituality: The Way of the Kyoto School,” in Buddhist Spirituality: Later China, Korea, Japan and the Modern World, Takeuchi Yoshinori (ed.), New York: Crossroad, pp. 367–388. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Philosophers of Nothingness: An Essay on the Kyoto School, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (A lucid introduction to the Kyoto School, focusing on key ideas of Nishida, Tanabe, and Nishitani; includes a wealth of valuable references to the debates that have surrounded the School, and an extensive multilingual bibliography. For a review, see Davis 2002.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2004, Japanese Philosophy Abroad, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (A valuable collection of scholarly articles presented at an international conference on the past and future of studies of “Japanese philosophy” in the various regions of the world.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2006, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (The first of an ongoing series of anthologies that focus largely on the Kyoto School. See also Hori & Curley 2006; Heisig & Uehara 2008; Lam & Cheung 2009; and Bouso & Heisig 2009.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, Much Ado About Nothingness: Essays on Nishida and Tanabe, Nagoya: Chisokudō. (Collects a range of important essays on Nishida and Tanabe by one of the leading scholars in the field.) (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W. and John C. Maraldo (eds.), 1994, Rude Awakenings: Zen, The Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (A well-rounded landmark collection of articles on the political controversy surrounding the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Heisig, James W. and Uehara Mayuko (eds.), 2008, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 3: Origins and Possibilities, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Himi, Kiyoshi, 1990, Tanabe tetsugaku kenkyū: Shūkyōgaku no kanten kara [Studies of the Philosophy of Tanabe: From the Perspective of Religious Studies], Tokyo: Hokujushuppan. (The most comprehensive single-author work on Tanabe’s thought, with a predominant focus on the several stages of his later philosophy of religion.) (Scholar)
  • Hori, Victor Sōgen and Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), 2008, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 3: Origins and Possibilities, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Jacinto Zavala, Agustín, 1989, Filosofía de la transformación del mundo: Introducción a la filosofía tardía de Nishida Kitarō, Michoacán: El Colegio de Michoacán. (One of many valuable texts and translations by the premier Spanish-speaking Nishida and Kyoto School scholar.) (Scholar)
  • Kasulis, T. P., 1981, Zen Action/Zen Person, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (A classic philosophical introduction to Zen Buddhism.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982, “The Kyoto School and the West,” The Eastern Buddhist, 15/2: 125–45. (An early review article which includes insightful critical responses to the literature on the Kyoto School that had appeared in the West prior to 1982.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, Engaging Japanese Philosophy: A Short History, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar) (The magnum opus of one of the leading scholars in the field. Contains lengthy treatments of Nishida and Watsuji among other premodern and modern Japanese philosophers.)
  • Keta, Masako, 1992, Shūkyō-keiken no tetsugaku: Jōdokyō-sekai no kaimei [Philosophy of Religious Experience: An Elucidation of the World of Pure Land Buddhism], Tokyo: Sōbunsha-sha. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, Nihirizumu no shisaku [The Thought of Nihilism], Tokyo: Sōbunsha-sha. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, Nishida Kitarō ‘Zen no kenkyū’ [Nishida Kitarō’s ‘An Inquiry into the Good’], Kyoto: Kōyō shobō. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “The Self-Awareness of Evil in Pure Land Buddhism: A Translation of Contemporary Kyoto School Philosopher Keta Masako,” Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, Jessica L. Main, Melanie Coughlin (trans.), Philosophy East and West, 67/1: 192–201. (A representative work of an important contemporary philosopher associated with the Kyoto School, accompanied by a substantial introduction by the translators.) (Scholar)
  • Kopf, Gereon, 2001, Beyond Personal Identity: Dōgen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self, Richmond, Surry: Curzon Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Between Identity and Difference: Three Ways of Reading Nishida’s Non-Dualism,” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, 31/1: 73–103. (A good account of how Nishida’s dialogue with his critics, Takahashi Satomi and Tanabe Hajime, assisted him in the pursuit of a philosophy of non-dualism that does not reduce difference to identity.) (Scholar)
  • Kosaka, Kunitsugu, 1995, Nishida Kitarō: Sono shisō to gendai [Nishida Kitarō: His Thought and the Contemporary Age], Kyoto: Minerva. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, Nishida Kitarō o meguru tetsugakusha gunzō [The Group of Philosophers Surrounding Nishida Kitarō], Kyoto: Minerva. (Contains clear presentations of Nishida’s thought in relation to that of Tanabe, Takahashi Satomi, Miki, Watsuji, and Hisamatsu.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Nishida tetsugaku to gendai: Rekishi, shūkyō, shizen o yomi-toku [Nishida Philosophy and the Contemporary Age: Explaining History, Religion, and Nature], Kyoto: Minerva. (Scholar)
  • Krummel, John W. M., 2015, Nishida Kitarō’s Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic, Dialectic of Place, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar) (A very well researched and insightful monograph on Nishida’s philosophy.)
  • Lam, Wing-keung and Cheung Ching-yuen (eds.), 2009, Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century, Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. (Scholar)
  • Laube, Johannes, 1984, Dialektik der absoluten Vermittlung. Hajime Tanabes Religionsphilosophie als Beitrag zum “Wettstreit der Liebe” zwischen Buddhismus und Christentum, Freiburg im Breisgau: Herder. (Scholar)
  • Light, Steven, 1987, Shūzō Kuki and Jean-Paul Sartre: Influence and Counter-Influence in the Early History of Existential Phenomenology, Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press. (Scholar)
  • Mafli, Paul, 1996, Nishida Kitarōs Denkweg, Munich: Iudicium Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Maraldo, John, 1997, “Contemporary Japanese Philosophy,” in Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy, Brian Carr and Indira Mahalingam (eds.), London and New York: Routledge, pp. 810–835. (A rich overview that situates the Kyoto School in the wider context of modern and contemporary Japanese philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Rethinking God: Heidegger in the Light of Absolute Nothingness, Nishida in the Shadow of Onto-Theology,” in Religious Experience and the End of Metaphysics, Jeffery Bloechl (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp. 31–49. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Defining Philosophy in the Making,” in Heisig 2004, pp. 220–245. (An informative and thought-provoking essay on the question of what “Japanese philosophy” has meant and should mean.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Ōbei no shiten kara mita Kyōtogakuha no yurai to yukue” [The Whence and Whither of the Kyoto School from a Western Perspective], Azumi Yurika (trans.), in Fujita & Davis 2005, pp. 31–56. (Scholar) (An excellent critical essay on the question of defining the “Kyoto School,” which unfortunately has yet to be published in English.)
  • –––, 2006, “The War Over the Kyoto School,” Monumenta Nipponica, 61/3 (Autumn): 375–401. (An insightful review article on Goto-Jones 2005 and Williams 2005.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Nishida Kitarō: Self, World, and the Nothingness Underlying Distinctions,” in Jay Garfield and William Edelglass (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of World Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 361–72. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “Japanese Philosophy as a Lens on Greco-European Thought,” Journal of Japanese Philosophy, 1: 21–56. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida, Nagoya: Chisokudō. (Collects a range of important essays on Nishida by one of the leading scholars in the field.) (Scholar)
  • Marchianò, Grazia, (ed.), 1996, La Scuola di Kyōto: Kyōto-ha, Messina: Rubberttino. (Scholar)
  • Matsumaru, Hideo, 2013, Chokusetsu-chi no tankyū: Nishida, Nishitani, Haideggā, Daisetsu [An Investigation into Immediate Knowledge: Nishida, Nishitani, Heidegger, D. T. Suzuki], Yokohama: Shunpū-sha. (Scholar)
  • Mayeda, Graham, 2006, Time, Space, and Ethics in the Philosophies of Watsuji Tetsurō, Kuki Shūzō, and Martin Heidegger, London & New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • McCarthy, Erin, 2010, Ethics Embodied: Rethinking Selfhood through Continental, Japanese, and Feminist Philosophies, Lanham: Lexington. (Insightfully and provocatively brings Watsuji’s ethics into dialogue with contemporary issues in Continental and feminist philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • Mitchell, Donald W., 1998, Masao Abe: A Zen Life of Dialogue, Boston: Charles E. Tuttle Co. (Consists of thirty-five chapters by different authors reflecting on the significance of Abe’s dialogues with philosophers and theologians in the West.) (Scholar)
  • Nagatomo, Shigenori, 1995, A Philosophical Foundation of Miki Kiyoshi’s Concept of Humanism, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press. (Scholar)
  • Nakamura, Yūjirō, 1983, Nishida Kitarō, Tokyo: Iwanami. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Nishida tetsugaku no datsukōchiku [The Deconstruction of Nishida Philosophy], Tokyo: Iwanami. (Scholar)
  • Nishida, Kitarō, 2002, Shin Nishida Kitarō Zenshū [New Complete Works of Nishida Kitarō], Fujita Masakatsu and Kosaka Kunitsugu (eds.), Tokyo: Iwanami. (This new revised and rearranged edition of Nishida’s works contains helpful editorial material, such as citation information for Nishida’s references.) (Scholar)
  • Ōhashi, Ryōsuke, 1984, Zeitlichkeitsanalyse der Hegelschen Logik. Zur Idee einer Phänomenologie des Ortes, Munich: Karl Alber. (A provocative Kyoto School oriented reading of Hegel.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, Nihon-tekina mono, Yōroppa-tekina mono [Things Japanese, Things European], Tokyo: Shinchōsha. (Scholar) (Insightfully treats a range of cultural and philosophical issues relating to modern Japan, the Kyoto School and associated thinkers.)
  • –––, 1994, Das Schöne in Japan. Philosophisch-ästhetische Reflexionen zu Geschichte und Moderne, Rolf Elberfeld (trans.), Köln: DuMont Buchverlag. (A classic philosophical interpretation of Japanese aesthetics.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, Nishida-tetsugaku no sekai [The World of Nishida Philosophy], Tokyo: Chikuma. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998, Hi no genshōron josetsu: Nihontetsugaku no roku tēze yori [Prolegomenon to a Phenomenology of Compassion: From Six theses of Japanese Philosophy], Tokyo: Sōbunsha. (Includes chapters on the contemporary relevance of key ideas of Nishida, Tanabe, Nishitani, and Hisamatsu.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, Japan im interkulturellen Dialog, München: Iudicium. (Contains a range of essays on Japan’s relation to the West, with chapters on and frequent reference to the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2004, Kyōtogakuha no shisō [The Thought of the Kyoto School], Kyoto: Jinbunshoin. (Contains five chapters that critically examine past and present images of the “Kyoto School,” and seven chapters that explore the potential of Kyoto School thought in various areas of contemporary philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, Nishida Kitarō: Hontō no Nihon wa kore kara to zonjimasu [Nishida Kitarō: I Know that the Real Japan is Still to Come], Kyoto: Minerva. (An illuminating philosophical biography.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018a, Kyōsei no patosu [Pathos of Being Together], Tokyo: Kobushi Shobō. (The Japanese version of a major work by the leading figure of what could be considered the fourth generation of the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018b, Phänomenology der Compassion: Pathos des Mitseins mit den Anderen, Freiburg & Munich: Verlag Karl Alber. (The German version of a major work by the leading figure of what could be considered the fourth generation of the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Parkes, Graham, 1997, “The Putative Fascism of the Kyoto School and the Political Correctness of the Modern Academy,” Philosophy East and West, 47/3: 305–336. (A critical response to polemical treatments of the nationalistic aspects of the Kyoto School, including those by Pincus 1996 and Faure 1995.) (Scholar)
  • Pincus, Leslie, 1996, Authenticating Culture in Imperial Japan: Kuki Shūzō and the Rise of National Aesthetics, Berkeley: University of California Press. (A highly critical treatment of the implications of cultural nationalism in Kuki’s aesthetics.) (Scholar)
  • Piovesana, Gino K., 1994, Recent Japanese Philosophical Thought, 1862–1996: A Survey, revised edition including a new survey by Naoshi Yamawaki: “The Philosophical Thought of Japan from 1963 to 1996,” Richmond, Surrey: Japan Library (Curzon Press Ltd). (A classic survey of modern Japanese philosophy.) (Scholar)
  • Stambaugh, Joan, 1999, The Formless Self, Albany: SUNY Press. (Insightfully discusses Dōgen, Hisamatsu, and Nishitani.) (Scholar)
  • Standish, Paul and Naoko Saito (eds.), 2012, Education and the Kyoto School of Philosophy: Pedagogy for Human Transformation, New York: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Stevens, Bernard, 2000, Topologie du néant: Une approche de l’école de Kyōto, Paris: Éditions Peeters. (Scholar)
  • Suares, Peter, 2011, The Kyoto School’s Takeover of Hegel: Nishida, Nishitani, and Tanabe Remake the Philosophy of Spirit, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. (Scholar)
  • Takeda, Atsushi, 2001, Monogatari “Kyōto-gakuha” [The Story of the “Kyoto School”], Tokyo: Chūōkōron Shinsha. (An engaging biographical account of the interpersonal relations and scholarly activities of the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)
  • Tanaka, Kyūbun, 2000, Nihon no “tetsugaku” o yomitoku [Reading Japanese “Philosophy”], Tokyo: Chikuma Shinsho. (Consists of introductory chapters on Nishida, Watsuji, Kuki, and Miki.) (Scholar)
  • Townsend, Susan C., 2009, Miki Kiyoshi 1897-1945: Japan’s Itinerant Philosopher, Boston: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Tremblay, Jacynthe, 2000, Nishida Kitarō: Le jeu de l’individuel et de l’universel, Paris: CNRS Editions. (Scholar)
  • Tsunetoshi, Sōzaburō, 1998, Nihon no tetsugaku o manabu hito no tame ni [For Students of Japanese Philosophy], Kyoto: Sekaishisōsha. (Consists of introductory chapters mostly on Kyoto School philosophers.) (Scholar)
  • Ueda, Shizuteru, 1992, Nishida Kitarō o yomu [Reading Nishida Kitarō], Tokyo: Iwanami. (The first of many influential books on Nishida by Ueda, in which Ueda develops his own thought by way of carefully reading Nishida’s texts, beginning with An Inquiry into the Good.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1992, Jōi ni okeru kū [Emptiness in Passion], Tokyo: Sōbunsha. (An important collection of essays on Nishitani.)
  • ––– (ed.), 1994, Nishida-tetsugaku [Nishida Philosophy], Tokyo: Sōbunsha. (An important collection of essays on Nishida.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2006, Zen to Kyoto-tetsugaku [Zen and Kyoto Philosophy], Kyoto: Tōeisha. (An important anthology on the most significant twentieth century Japanese philosophers who were engaged in the study and practice of Zen.) (Scholar)
  • Ueda, Shizuteru and Horio Tsutomu (eds.), 1998, Zen to gendaisekai [Zen and the Modern World], Kyoto: Zenbunka Kenkyūsho. (Consists of chapters on Nishida, D. T. Suzuki, Nishitani, and Hisamatsu, addressing the relation of their thought to Zen.) (Scholar)
  • Unno, Taitetsu (ed.), 1989, The Religious Philosophy of Nishitani Keiji, Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press. (A landmark collection of responses to Nishitani’s philosophy of religion.) (Scholar)
  • Unno, Taitetsu and James W. Heisig (eds.), 1990, The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime, Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press. (A landmark collection of responses to Tanabe’s philosophy of religion.) (Scholar)
  • Unno, Taitetsu, 1998, River of Fire, River of Water: An Introduction to the Pure Land Tradition of Shin Buddhism, New York: Double Day. (An accessible and engaging introduction to Shin Buddhist thought.) (Scholar)
  • Waldenfels, Hans, 1980, Absolute Nothingness: Foundations for a Buddhist-Christian Dialogue, J. W. Heisig (trans.), New York: Paulist Press. (An important early Western work focusing on Nishitani from the perspective of Buddhist-Christian dialogue.) (Scholar)
  • Wargo, Robert J. J., 2005, The Logic of Nothingness: A Study of Nishida Kitarō, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (A landmark philosophical study which traces the early development of Nishida’s thought from out of the context of Japanese philosophy in the Meiji period, and which focuses in particular on the subsequent development of his unique “logic of basho.”) (Scholar)
  • Wilkinson, Robert, 2009, Nishida and Western Philosophy, Surrey, UK: Ashgate. (An account of Nishida’s philosophy which sets his thought in the context of his Zen background as well as his critical dialogue with Western philosophers such as James, Bergson, Fichte, the Neo-Kantians, and Hegel. For a review, see Davis 2011d.) (Scholar)
  • Williams, David, 2005, Defending Japan’s Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power, London & New York: Routledge. (A highly provocative revisionist account of the Pacific War and defense of the Kyoto School’s wartime political thought, which centers on an interpretation of Tanabe as a pioneer “post-White” political philosopher.) (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, The Philosophy of Japanese Wartime Resistance: A Reading, with Commentary, of the Complete Texts of the Kyoto School Discussions of “The Standpoint of World History and Japan,” New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Yusa, Michiko, 1997, “Contemporary Buddhist Philosophy,” in A Companion to World Philosophies, Eliot Deutsch and Ron Bontekoe (ed.), Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 564–572. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, Zen & Philosophy: An Intellectual Biography of Nishida Kitarō, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (A very informative and lucid account of Nishida’s personal and scholarly life, including his relations with other Kyoto School thinkers.) (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2017, The Bloombury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy, New York: Bloomsbury. (Contains a number of chapters devoted to developing the thought of philosophers associated with the Kyoto School.) (Scholar)

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