Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Laozi" by Alan Chan

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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  • Allan, Sarah, 2003. “The Great One, Water, and the Laozi: New Light from Guodian,” T’oung Pao, 89: 237–285. (Scholar)
  • Allan, Sarah, and Crispin Williams, 2000. The Guodian Laozi, Berkeley: Society for the Study of Early China and the Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California. (Scholar)
  • Ames, Roger T., and David L. Hall (trans.), 2003. Daodejing—Making This Life Significant—A Philosophical Translation, New York: Ballantine Books. (Scholar)
  • Assandri, Friederike, 2009. Beyond the Daode Jing: Twofold Mystery in Tang Daoism, Dunedin, FL: Three Pines Press. (Scholar)
  • Baxter, William H., 1998. “Situating the Language of the Lao-tzu: The Probable Date of the Tao-te-ching,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, edited by Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue, Albany: State University of New York Press, 231–253. (Scholar)
  • Bokenkamp, Stephen, 1993. “Traces of Early Celestial Master Physiological Practice in the Xiang’er Commentary,” Taoist Resources, 4(2): 37–52. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997. Early Taoist Scriptures, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Boltz, William G., 1984. “Textual Criticism and the Ma Wang Tui Lao-tzu,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 44: 185–224. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1985. “The Laozi Text that Wang Pi and Ho-shang Kung Never Saw,” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, 48: 493–501. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993. “Lao tzu Tao te ching,” in Early Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, edited by Michael Loewe, Berkeley: University of California, Institute of East Asian Studies, 269–292. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996. “Notes on the Authenticity of the So Tan Manuscript of the Lao-tzu,” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, 59: 508–515. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999. “The Fourth-Century B.C. Guodiann Manuscripts From Chuu and the Composition of the Laotzyy,” Journal of the American Oriental Society, 119(4): 590–608. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005. “Reading the Early Laotzyy,” Asiatische Studien/Études Asiatiques, 59(1): 209–232. (Scholar)
  • Brooks, E. Bruce, and A. Taeko Brooks, 1998. The Original Analects, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Capra, Fritjof, 1975. The Tao of Physics, London: Wildwood House. (Scholar)
  • Chan, Alan K. L., 1991. “The Formation of the Heshang gong Legend,” in Sages and Filial Sons: Mythology and Archaeology in Ancient China, edited by Julia Ching and R. Guisso, Hong Kong: Chinese University Press, 101–134. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991a. Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and Ho-shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-tzu, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998. “A Tale of Two Commentaries: Ho-shang-kung and Wang Pi on the Lao-tzu,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, edited by Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue, Albany: State University of New York Press, 89–117. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998a. “The Essential Meaning of the Way and Virtue: Yan Zun and ‘Laozi Learning’ in Early Han China,” Monumenta Serica, 46: 105–127. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999. “The Daodejing and Its Tradition,” in Daoism Handbook, Livia Kohn (ed.), Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1–29. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010a. “Affectivity and the Nature of the Sage: Gleanings from a Tang Daoist Master” Journal of Daoist Studies, 3: 1–27. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011. “Interpretations of Virtue (De) in Early China,” Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 38: 158–174. (Scholar)
  • Chan, Wing-tsit, 1963. The Way of Lao Tzu, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill. (Scholar)
  • Chen, Ellen M., 1969. “Nothingness and the Mother Principle in Early Chinese Taoism,” International Philosophical Quarterly, 9(3): 391–405. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1974. “Tao as the Great Mother and the Influence of Motherly Love in the Shaping of Chinese Philosophy,” History of Religions, 14(1): 51–64. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. The Tao Te Ching: A New Translation with Commentary, New York: Paragon House. (Scholar)
  • Ching, Julia, 1997. Mysticism and Kingship in China, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Clarke, J. J., 2000. The Tao of the West: Western Transformations of Taoist Thought, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Creel, Herlee G., 1970. What is Taoism? And Other Studies in Chinese Cultural History, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Csikszentmihalyi, Mark, and Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), 1999. Religious and Philosophical Aspects of the Laozi, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Ding Sixin, 2000. Guodian Chumu zhujian sixiang yanjiu, Beijing: Dongfang chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Emerson, John, 1995. “A Stratification of Lao Tzu,” Journal of Chinese Religions, 23: 1–28. (Scholar)
  • Erkes, Eduard, 1935. “Arthur Waley’s Laotse-Übersetzung,” Artibus Asiae, 5: 285–307. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1958. Ho-shang Kung’s Commentary on Lao-tse, Ascona: Artibus Asiae. (Scholar)
  • Fukui Kōjun, et al., 1983. Dōkyō, 3 vols., Tokyo: Hirakawa shuppansha.
  • Fung Yu-lan, 1983. A History of Chinese Philosophy, translated by Derk Bodde, 2 vols., Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gao Heng, 1981 [1940]. Chongding Laozi zhenggu, Taipei: Xinwenfeng; original publication date 1940.
  • Girardot, Norman J., 1983. Myth and Meaning in Early Taoism, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Graham, A. C., 1986. The Origins of the Legend of Lao Tan, Singapore: Institute of East Asian Philosophies. Reprinted in A. C. Graham, Studies in Chinese Philosophy and Philosophical Literature, Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990, 111–124. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. Disputers of the Tao: Philosophical Argument in Ancient China, La Salle, IL: Open Court. (Scholar)
  • Guodian Chu mu zhujian, 1998. Edited by the Jingmen City Museum, Beijing: Wenwu chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Hall, David, and Roger Ames, 1989. Thinking Through Confucius, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Hansen, Chad, 1992. A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Han, Wei (ed.), 2012. Laozi-Beijing Daoxue cang Xi Han zhushu (Laozi: Peking University Collection of Western Han Bamboo Texts, Volume 2; series edited by Beijing Daxue chutu wenxian yanjiusuo), Shanghai: Shanghai guji chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Hardy, Julia, 1998. “Influential Western Interpretations of the Tao-te-ching,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue (eds.), Albany: State University of New York Press, 165–188. (Scholar)
  • Hatano Tarō, 1979. Rōshi dōtokukyō kenkyū, Tokyo: Kokusho kankōkai.
  • Hawkes, David (trans.), 1985. The Songs of the South: An Anthology of Ancient Chinese Poems by Qu Yuan and Other Poets, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. (Scholar)
  • Henricks, Robert G., 1982. “On the Chapter Divisions in the Lao-tzu,” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, 45: 501–24. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. Lao-Tzu Te-Tao Ching: A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts, New York: Ballantine Books. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000. Lao Tzu’s Tao Te Ching: A Translation of the Startling New Documents Found at Guodian, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hoff, Benjamin, 1982. The Tao of Pooh, New York: E.P. Dutton. (Scholar)
  • Ikeda, Tomohisa, 2004. “The Evolution of the Concept of Filial Piety (xiao) in the Laozi, the Zhuangzi, and the Guodian Bamboo Text Yucong,” in Filial Piety in Chinese Thought and History, Alan K. L. Chan and Sor-hoon Tan (eds.), London and New York: Routledge-Curzon, 12-28. (Scholar)
  • Ivanhoe, Philip J., 1999. “The Concept of De (‘Virtue’) in the Laozi,” in Religious and Philosophical Aspects of the Laozi, Mark Csikszentmihalyi and P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Albany: State University of New York Press, 239–257. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 2002. The Daodejing of Laozi, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • Jaspers, Karl, 1974. Anaximander, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Plotinus, Lao-tzu, Nagarjuna (The Great Philosophers, Volume 2: The Original Thinkers), Hannah Arendt (ed.), Ralph Manheim (trans.), New York and London: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich/A Harvest Book, 1974. (Scholar)
  • Jiang Xichang, 1937. Laozi jiaogu, Taipei: Dongsheng. (Scholar)
  • Kaltenmark, Max, 1969. Lao Tzu and Taoism, translated by Roger Greaves, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kim, Hongkyung, 2012. The Old Master: A Syncretic Reading of the Laozi from the Mawangdui Text A Onward, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Kimura Eiichi, 1959. Rōshi no shin kenkyū, Tokyo: Sōbunsha.
  • Kohn, Livia, 1992. Early Chinese Mysticism: Philosophy and Soteriology in the Taoist Tradition, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998a. “The Lao-tzu Myth,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, edited by Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue, Albany: State University of New York Press, 41–62. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998b. God of the Dao: Lord Lao in History and Myth, Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001. Daoism and Chinese Culture, Dunedin, Fl: Three Pines Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2000. Daoism Handbook, Leiden and Boston: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Kohn, Livia, and Michael LaFargue (eds.), 1998. Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Kusuyama Haruki, 1979. Rōshi densetsu no kenkyū, Tokyo: Sōbunsha.
  • LaFargue, Michael, 1992. The Tao of the Tao Te Ching, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994. Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, and Julian Pas, 1998. “On Translating the Tao-te-ching,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue (eds.), Albany: State University of New York Press, 277–301. (Scholar)
  • Lai, Karyn, 2007. “Ziran and Wuwei in the Daodejing: An Ethical Assessment,” Dao, 6: 325–337. (Scholar)
  • Lau, D. C., 1963. Lao Tzu Tao Te Ching, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982. Chinese Classics: Tao Te Ching, Hong Kong: Chinese University Press. (Scholar)
  • Legge, James, 1962 [1891]. The Texts of Taoism, Part 1 (The Sacred Books of the East, volume 39), New York: Dover; original publication date 1891.
  • Lin, Paul J., 1977. A Translation of Lao Tzu’s Tao Te Ching and Wang Pi’s Commentary, Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. (Scholar)
  • Liu Cunren, 1969. “Daozangben sansheng zhu Daodejing zhi deshi,” Chongji xuebao, 9(1): 1–9. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1971–73. “Daozangben sansheng zhu Daodejing huijian,” Parts 1–3, Zhongguo wenhua yanjiusuo xuebao, 4: 287–343; 5: 9–75; 6: 1–43. (Scholar)
  • Liu, Xiaogan, 1991. “Wuwei (Non-Action): From Laozi to Huainanzi,” Taoist Resources 3(1): 41–56. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1994. Classifying the Zhuangzi Chapters, Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997. Laozi, Taipei: Dongda; second, revised edition, 2005. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998. “Naturalness (Tzu-jan), the Core Value in Taoism: Its Ancient Meaning and Its Significance Today,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue (eds.), Albany: State University of New York Press, 211–228. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003. “From Bamboo Slips to Received Versions: Common Features in the Transformation of the Laozi.Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 63: 337–382. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006. Laozi gujin, 2 vols., Beijing: Zhongguo shehui kexue chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2015. Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Loewe, Michael, and Edward L. Shaughnessy (eds.), 1999. The Cambridge History of Ancient China, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lou, Yulie, 1980. Wang Bi ji jiaoshi, Beijing: Zhonghua shuju. (Scholar)
  • Lynn, Richard John (trans.), 1994. The Classic of Changes: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999. The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015. “Wang Bi and Xuanxue,” in Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy, Xiaogan Liu (ed.), Dordrecht: Springer, 369–395. (Scholar)
  • Ma Chengyuan (ed.), 2003. Shanghai Bowuguan zang Zhanguo Chu zhushu (Volume 3), Shanghai: Shanghai guji chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Ma Xulun, 1965. Laozi jiaogu, Hong Kong: Taiping shuju. (Scholar)
  • Mair, Victor, 1990. Tao Te Ching: The Classic Book of Integrity and the Way, New York: Bantam Books. (Scholar)
  • Moeller, Hans-Georg, 2006. The Philosophy of the Daodejing, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 2007. Daodejing (Laozi): A Complete Translation and Commentary, Chicago: Open Court. (Scholar)
  • Mukai Tetsuo, 1994. “Rokuto no kisoteki kenkyū,” Tōhō shūkyō, 83: 32–51. (Scholar)
  • Needham, Joseph, 1956. Science and Civilisation in China, Volume 2, History of Scientific Thought, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Nivison, David S., 1978–79. “Royal ‘Virtue’ in Shang Oracle Inscriptions,” Early China, 4: 52–55. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996. The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy, edited with an introduction by Bryan Van Norden, Chicago and LaSalle: Open Court. (Scholar)
  • Pelliot, Paul, 1912. “Autour d’une traduction sanscrite du Tao To King,” T’oung-pao, 13: 351–430. (Scholar)
  • Puett, Michael, 2004. “Forming Spirits for the Way: The Cosmology of the Xiang’er Commentary,” Journal of Chinese Religions, 32: 1–27. (Scholar)
  • Queen, Sarah A, 2013. “Han Feizi and the Old Master: A Comparative Analysis and Translation of Han Feizi Chapter 20, ‘Jie Lao’, and Chapter 21, ‘Yu Lao’,” in Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei, Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dordrecht: Springer, 197–256. (Scholar)
  • Rand, Christopher, 1979–80. “Chinese Military Thought and Philosophical Taoism,” Monumenta Serica, 34: 171–218. (Scholar)
  • Rao Zongyi, 1955. “Wu Jianheng er’nian Suo Dan xieben Daodejing canjuan kaozheng,” Journal of Oriental Studies, 2: 1–71. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991. Laozi Xiang’er zhu jiaozheng, Shanghai: Shanghai Guji. (Scholar)
  • Roberts, Moss (trans.), 2001. Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Robinet, Isabelle, 1977. Les commentaires du Tao to king jusqu’au VIIe siècle, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1998. “Later Commentaries: Textual Polysemy and Syncretistic Interpretations,” in Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching, edited by Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue, Albany: State University of New York Press, 119–142. (Scholar)
  • Roth, Harold D., 1991. “Psychology and Self-Cultivation in Early Taoistic Thought,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 51: 599–650. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999. Original Tao: Inward Training and the Foundations of Taoist Mysticism, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Rump, Ariane, 1979. Commentary on the Lao-tzu by Wang Pi, in Collaboration with Wing-tsit Chan, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Ryden, Edmund, 2008. Daodejing, Introduction by Benjamin Penny, Oxford World’s Classics Series, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Saso, Michael, 1994. A Taoist Cookbook: With Meditations Taken from the Laozi Daode Jing, Boston: Tuttle Press. (Scholar)
  • Schwartz, Benjamin, 1985. The World of Thought in Ancient China, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Seidel, Anna, 1969. La divinisation de Lao-tseu dans le taoïsme des Han, Paris: Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient. (Scholar)
  • Shima Kunio, 1973. Rōshi kōsei, Tokyo: Kyūkoshoin.
  • Sivin, Nathan, 1978. “On the Word ‘Taoist’ as a Source of Perplexity,” History of Religions, 17: 303–330. (Scholar)
  • Slingerland, Edward, 2003. Effortless Action: Wu-wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Tsai Chih Chung, et al., 1995. The Silence of the Wise: The Sayings of Laozi, Asiapac Comic Series, Singapore: Asiapac Books. Orig. pub. 1989. (Scholar)
  • Wagner, Rudolf G., 1980. “Interlocking Parallel Style: Laozi and Wang Bi,” Études Asiatiques, 34.1: 18–58. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1989. “The Wang Bi Recension of the Laozi,” Early China, 14: 27–54. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000. The Craft of a Chinese Commentator: Wang Bi on the Laozi, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003. A Chinese Reading of the Daodejing: Wang Bi’s Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Waley, Arthur, 1958. The Way and Its Power: A Study of the Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought, New York: Grove Press. (Scholar)
  • Wang Ming, 1984. “Lun Laozi bingshu,” in Wang Ming, Daojia he daojiao sixiang yanjiu, Chongqing: Zhongguo shehui kexue chubanshe, 27–36. (Scholar)
  • Wang Zhongmin, 1981. Laozi kao, Taipei: Dongsheng. Originally published 1927. (Scholar)
  • Welch, Holmes, 1965. Taoism: The Parting of the Way, Boston: Beacon Press. (Scholar)
  • Xiong Tieji, et al., 1995. Zhongguo Laoxueshi, Fuzhou: Fujian renmin chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Xiong Tieji, et al., 2002. Ershi shiji Zhongguo Laoxue, Fuzhou: Fujian renmin chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Xu Kangsheng, 1985. Boshu Laozi zhuyi yu yanjiu, Zhejiang renmin chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Yan Lingfeng, 1957. Zhongwai Laozi zhushu mulu, Taipei: Zhonghua congshu weiyuanhui. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1965a. Wuqiubeizhai Laozi jicheng, chubian, Taipei: Yiwen yinshuguan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1965b. Wuqiubeizhai Laozi jicheng, xubian, Taipei: Yiwen yinshuguan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1976. Mawangdui boshu Laozi shitan, Taipei: Heluo tushu chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • Yu, Anthony C., 2003. “Reading the Daodejing: Ethics and Politics of the Rhetoric,” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), 25: 165–187. (Scholar)

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