Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Mental Imagery" by Bence Nanay

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Amsel, B. D., M. Kutas and S. Coulson, 2017, “Projectors, Associators, Visual Imagery and the Time Course of Visual Processing in Grapheme-color Synesthesia,” Cognitive Neuroscience, 8 (4): 206–223. doi:10.1080/17588928.2017.1353492 (Scholar)
  • Antonioni, M., 1982, “La method de Michelangelo Antonioni (interview with Serge Daney),” Cahiers du Cinema, nr. 342: 4–7, 61–65. (Scholar)
  • Arcangeli, M., 2020, “The Two Faces of Mental Imagery,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 101: 304–322. (Scholar)
  • Arditi, A. J. D. Holtzman and S. M. Kosslyn, 1988, “Mental Imagery and Sensory Experience in Congenital Blindness,” Neuropsychologia, 26: 1–12. (Scholar)
  • Austin, J. T., & J. B. Vancouver, 1996, “Goal constructs in psychology: Structure, process, and content,” Psychological Bulletin, 120(3): 338–375.
  • Bakin, J., K. Nakayama, & C. Gilbert, 2000, “Visual responses in monkey areas V1 and V2 to three-dimensional surface configurations,” Journal of Neuroscience, 20: 8188–8198. (Scholar)
  • Ban, H., H. Yamamoto, T. Hanakawa, S. Urayama, T. Aso, H. Fukuyama and Y. Ejima, 2013. “Topographic representation of an occluded object and the effects of spatiotemporal context in human early visual areas,” Journal of Neuroscience, 33: 16992–17007. (Scholar)
  • Barnett, K. J., & F. N. Newell, 2008, “Synaesthesia is associated with enhanced, self-rated visual imagery,” Consciousness and Cognition, 17(3): 1032–9. (Scholar)
  • Benoit, R. G., P. C. Paulus and D. L. Schachter, 2019, “Forming attitudes via neural activity supporting affective episodic simulations,” Nature Communications, 10: 2215. (Scholar)
  • Bernecker, S., 2010, Memory: A Philosophical Study, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Berryhill, M. E., L. Phuong, L. Picasso, R. Cabeza, and I. R. Olson, 2007, “Parietal Lobe and Episodic Memory: Bilateral Damage Causes Impaired Free Recall of Autobiographical Memory,” Journal of Neuroscience, 27: 14415–14423. (Scholar)
  • Blair, I. V., 2002, “The malleability of automatic stereotypes and prejudice,” Personality and Social Psychology Review, 6: 242 – 61. (Scholar)
  • Blair, I. V., J. E. Ma, and A. P. Lenton, 2001, “Imagining stereotypes away: the moderation of implicit stereotypes through mental imagery,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81: 828 – 41. (Scholar)
  • Blaney, P. H., 1986, “Affect and Memory,” Psychological Bulletin, 99: 229–246. (Scholar)
  • Boutonnet, B. & G. Lupyan, 2015, “Words Jump-Start Vision: A Label Advantage in Object Recognition,” Journal of Neuroscience, 35: 9329–9335. (Scholar)
  • Bresson, R., 1975 [1977], Note on the cinematographer, Paris: Gallimard, 1975; New York: Urizen, 1977. (Scholar)
  • Briscoe, R., 2011, “Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 92: 153–173. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, “Superimposed Mental Imagery: On the Uses of Make-Perceive,” in F. Macpherson and F. Dorsch (eds.), Perceptual Memory and Perceptual Imagination, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Brogaard, B. and D. E. Gatzia, 2017, “Unconscious imagination and the mental imagery debate,” Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 799. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00799 (Scholar)
  • Brozzo, C., 2017, “Motor intentions: How intentions and motor representations come together,” Mind & Language, 32: 231–256. (Scholar)
  • Burch, N., 1973, Theory of Film Practice, New York: Praeger. (Scholar)
  • Byrne, A., 2007, “Possibility and imagination,” Philosophical Perspectives, 21: 125–44. (Scholar)
  • Byrne P., S. Becker, N. Burgess, 2007, “Remembering the past and imagining the future: a neural model of spatial memory and imagery,” Psychological Review, 114: 340–375. (Scholar)
  • Chalmers, D. J., 2002, “Does conceivability entail possibility?”, in T. S. Gendler and J. Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 145–200. (Scholar)
  • Church, J., 2008, “The hidden image: A defense of unconscious imagining and its importance,” American Imago, 65: 379–404. (Scholar)
  • Cohen, J., 2017, “Synaesthetic perception as continuous with ordinary perception, or, we are all synesthetes now,” in O. Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blending, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Currie, G., 1995, “Visual Imagery as the Simulation of Vision,” Mind and Language, 10: 25–44. (Scholar)
  • Currie, G. & I. Ravenscroft, 1997, “Mental simulation and motor imagery,” Philosophy of Science, 64(1): 161–180. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • De Brigard, F., 2014, “Is memory for remembering? Recollection as a form of episodic hypothetical thinking,” Synthese, 191(2): 155–185. (Scholar)
  • de Groot, F., F. Huettig, & C. N. L. Olivers, 2016, “When meaning matters: The temporal dynamics of semantic influences on visual attention,” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42: 180–196. (Scholar)
  • Defrin R., A. Ohry, N. Blumen, and G. Urca, 2002, “Sensory Determinants of Thermal Pain,” Brain, 125: 501–10. (Scholar)
  • Dennett, D. C., 1969, “The Nature of Images and the Introspective Trap,” reprinted in Content and Consciousness, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, pp. 132–46. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, “Seeing is believing—or is it?”, in K. Akins (ed.), Perception, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 111–31. (Scholar)
  • Dijkstra, N., S. E. Boschand M. A. J. van Gerven, 2019, “Shared neural mechanisms of visual perception and imagery,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 23: 423–434. (Scholar)
  • Dixon, M. J, D. Smilek, & P. M. Merikle, 2004, “Not All Synaesthetes are Created Equal: Projector versus Associator Synaesthetes,” Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, 4(3): 335–43. (Scholar)
  • Ekroll, V., B. Sayim, R. Van der Hallen and J. Wagemans, 2016, “Illusory Visual Completion of an Object’s Invisible Backside Can Make Your Finger Feel Shorter,” Current Biology, 26: 1029–1033. (Scholar)
  • Emmanouil, T. & T. Ro, 2014, “Amodal Completion of Unconsciously Presented Objects,” Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(5): 1188–94. (Scholar)
  • Fardo, F., M. Allen, E-M. E. Jegindo, A. Angrilli, and A. Roepstorff, 2015, “Neurocognitive Evidence for Mental Imagery-Driven Hypoalgesic and Hyperalgesic Pain Regulation,” NeuroImage, 120: 350–61. (Scholar)
  • Fazekas, P., B. Nanay and J. Pearson, 2021, “Offline Perception,” Special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 376 (1817): 20190686 (Scholar)
  • Gaddy, M. A. and R. E. Ingram, 2014, “A Meta-analytic Review of Mood-congruent Implicit Memory in Depressed Mood,” Clinical Psychological Review, 34: 402–416. (Scholar)
  • Galton, F., 1880, “Statistics of Mental Imagery,” Mind, 5: 301–18. (Scholar)
  • Gauker, C., forthcoming, “On the difference between realistic and fantastic imaginings,” Erkenntnis. (Scholar)
  • Gelbard-Sagiv, H., R. Mukamel, M. Harel, R. Malach, and I. Fried, 2008, “Internally Generated Reactivation of Single Neurons in Human Hippocampus During Free Recall,” Science, 322 (5898): 96–101. (Scholar)
  • Green, M. C., & T. C. Brock, 2000, “The role of transportation in the persuasiveness of public narratives,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(5): 701–721. (Scholar)
  • Gregory, D., 2010, “Imagery, the Imagination and Experience,” Philosophical Quarterly, 60: 735–753. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and their Contents, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Visual expectations and visual imagination,” Philosophical Perspectives, 31: 187–206. (Scholar)
  • Grill-Spector, K. and R. Malach, 2004, “The human visual cortex,” Annual Review of Neuroscience, 27: 649–677. (Scholar)
  • Hamann, S., 2001, “Cognitive and Neural Mechanisms of Emotional Memory,” Trends in Cognitive Science, 5: 394–400 (Scholar)
  • Harvey, K., E. Kemps, M. Tiggemann, 2005, “The nature of imagery processes underlying food cravings,” British Journal of Health Psychology, 10: 49–56. (Scholar)
  • Helton, G. and B. Nanay, 2019, “Amodal completion and knowledge,” Analysis, 79: 415–423. (Scholar)
  • Hertrich, I., S. Dietrich, & H. Ackermann, 2011, “Cross-modal interactions during perception of audiovisual speech and nonspeech signals: an fMRI study,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23: 221–237. (Scholar)
  • Hobbes, T., 1651, Leviathan, London. (Scholar)
  • Holmes, E. A. and A. Matthews, 2010, “Mental imagery in emotion and emotional disorders,” Clinical Psychology Review, 30: 349–362. (Scholar)
  • Hopkins, R., 2018, “Imagining the past,” in F. Macpherson (ed.), Perceptual Imagination and Perceptual Memory, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 46–71. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, “What Perky did not show,” Analysis, 72: 431–439. (Scholar)
  • Hume, D., 1739, A Treatise of Human Nature, London. (Scholar)
  • Jeannerod, M., 1994, “The representing brain: Neural correlates of motor intention and imagery,” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 17: 187–245. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, The Cognitive Neuroscience of Action, Oxford: Blackwell. (Scholar)
  • Judge, J. and B. Nanay, 2021, “Expectations,” in N. Nielsen, J. Levinson and T. McAuley (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Music and Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 997–1018. (Scholar)
  • Kavanagh, D. J., J. Andrade, J. May, 2005, “Imaginary relish and exquisite torture: The Elaborated Intrusion theory of desire,” Psychological Review, 112 (2): 446–467. (Scholar)
  • Kavanagh, D. J., J. May, J. Andrade, 2009, “Tests of the Elaborated Intrusion Theory of craving and desire: Features of alcohol craving during treatment for an alcohol disorder,” British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 48: 241–254. (Scholar)
  • Keltner, J. R., A. Furst, C. Fan, R. Redfern, B. Inglis, and H. K. Fields, 2006, “Isolating the Modulatory Effect of Expectation on Pain Transmission: An fMRI Study,” Journal of Neuroscience, 26: 4437–43. (Scholar)
  • Kemps, E. and M. Tiggemann, 2007, “Modality-specific imagery reduces cravings for food: An application of the elaborated intrusion theory of desire to food craving,” Journal of Experimental Psychology-Applied, 13(2): 95-104. (Scholar)
  • Kemps, E., M. Tiggemann, J. Orr, J. Grear, 2014, “Attentional retraining can reduce chocolate consumption,” Journal of Experimental Psychology-Applied, 20(1): 94–102. (Scholar)
  • Kentridge, R. W., C. A. Heywood, and L. Weiskrantz, 1999, “Attention without awareness in blindsight,” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 266: 1805–1811 (Scholar)
  • Kilteni, K. B. J. Andersson, C. Houborg, H. H. Ehrson, 2018, “Motor imagery involves predicting the sensory consequences of the imagined movement”, Nature Communications, 9: 1617. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03989-0 (Scholar)
  • Kind, A., 2017, “Imaginative vividness,” Journal of the American Philosophical Association, 3: 32–50. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “The Heterogeneity of the Imagination,” Erkenntnis, 78(1): 141–59. (Scholar)
  • Kind, A. and P. Kung (eds.), 2016, Knowledge Through Imagination, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Koenig-Robert, R. & J. Pearson, 2021, “Why do imagery and perception look and feel so different?”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 376 (1817): 20190703. (Scholar)
  • Kosslyn, S. M., 1980, Image and Mind, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kosslyn, S. M., M. Behrmann, & M. Jeannerod, 1995a, “The cognitive neuroscience of mental imagery,” Neuropsychologia, 33: 1335–1344. (Scholar)
  • Kosslyn, S. M., W. L. Thompson, and G. Ganis, 2006, The Case for Mental Imagery, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kouider, S., & S. Dehaene, 2007, “Levels of processing during non-conscious perception: A critical review of visual masking,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 362: 857–875. (Scholar)
  • Kraemer, D. J. M., C. N. Macrae, A. E. Green, & W. M. Kelley, 2005, “Musical imagery: Sound of silence activates auditory cortex,” Nature, 434: 158. (Scholar)
  • Kubler, G., 1987, “Eidetic imagery and Paleolithic art,” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, 40: 78–85. (Scholar)
  • Kulpe, O., 1895, Outlines of Psychology, London: Sonnenschein. (Scholar)
  • Kulvicki, J., 2014, Images, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Kung, P., 2010, “Imagining as a Guide to Possibility,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 81(3): 620–663. (Scholar)
  • LaBar, K. S. & R. Cabeza, 2006, “Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotional Memory,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 7: 54–64. (Scholar)
  • Lacey, S. and R. Lawson (eds.), 2013, Multisensory Imagery, New York: Springer. (Scholar)
  • Laeng, B., I. M. Bloem, S. D’Ascenzo and L. Tommasi, 2014, “Scrutinizing visual images: The role of gaze in mental imagery and memory,” Cognition, 131: 263–283. (Scholar)
  • Lai, C. K., M. Marini, S. A. Lehr, C. Cerruti, J-E. L. Shin, J. A. Joy-Gaba, A. K. Ho, B. A. Teachman, S. P. Wojcik, S. P. Koleva, R. S. Frazier, L. Heiphetz, E. E. Chen, R. N. Turner, J. Haidt, S. Kesebir, C. B. Hawkins, H. S. Schaefer, S. Rubichi, G. Sartori, C. M. Dial, N. Sriram, M. R. Banaji, and B. A. Nosek, 2014, “Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: I. A Comparative Investigation of 17 Interventions,” Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143: 1765–85. (Scholar)
  • Lamme, V. A. and P. R. Roelfsema, 2000, “The distinct modes of vision offered by feedforward and recurrent processing,” Trends in Neuroscience, 23: 571–579. (Scholar)
  • Langland-Hassan, P., 2015, “Imaginative Attitudes,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 40: 664­–686. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, “On choosing what to imagine,” in A. Kind & P. Kung (eds.), Knowledge Through Imagination, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 85–109 (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, Explaining Imagination, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Langland-Hassan, P. and A. Vicente, 2018, Inner Speech: New Voices, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Leaver, A. M., J. Van Lare, B. Zielinski, A. R. Halpern, & J. P. Rauschecker, 2009, “Brain activation during anticipation of sound sequences,” The Journal of Neuroscience, 29(8): 2477–2485. (Scholar)
  • Lee, T. S. and M. Nguyen, 2001, “Dynamics of subjective contour formation in the early visual cortex,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98: 1907–1911. (Scholar)
  • Levin, J., 2006, “Can mental images provide evidence for what is possible?”, Anthropology and Philosophy, 7: 108–119. (Scholar)
  • Litt, M. D. , & N. L. Cooney, 1999, “Inducing craving for alcohol in the laboratory,” Alcohol Research and Health, 23(3): 174–178. (Scholar)
  • Loeffler, S. N., M. Myrtek & M. Peper, 2013, “Mood-congruent Memory in Daily Life: Evidence from Interactive Ambulatory Monitoring,” Biological Psychology, 93: 308–15. (Scholar)
  • Lopes, D. M., 2003, “Out of Sight, Out of Mind,” in M. Kieran and D. M. Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts, London: Routledge, pp. 208–224. (Scholar)
  • Luria, A. R., 1960, “Memory and the Structure of Mental Processes,” Problems of Psychology, 4: 81–94. (Scholar)
  • MacIver, K., D. M. Lloyd, S. Kelly, N. Roberts, and T. Nurmikko, 2008, “Phantom Limb Pain, Cortical Reorganization and the Therapeutic Effect of Mental Imagery,” Brain, 131: 2181–91. (Scholar)
  • Macpherson, F., 2012, “Cognitive penetration of colour experience,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 84: 24–62 (Scholar)
  • Matt, G. E., C. Vazquez & W. K. Campbell, 1992, “Mood-congruent Recall of Affectively Toned Stimuli: A Meta-analytic Review,” Clinical Psychology Review, 12: 227–255. (Scholar)
  • Matthen, M., 2017, “When is synaesthesia perception?” in O. Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blending, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 166–178.. (Scholar)
  • May, J., J. Andrade, H. Batey, L-M. Berry, D. J. Kavanagh, 2010, “Less food for thought: Impact of attentional instructions on intrusive thoughts about snack foods,” Appetite, 55: 279–287. (Scholar)
  • May, J., J. Andrade, D. J. Kavanagh, L. Penfound, 2008, “Imagery and strength of craving for eating, drinking and playing sport,” Cognition and Emotion, 22: 633–50. (Scholar)
  • May, J., D. J. Kavanagh, & J. Andrade, 2014, “The Elaborated Intrusion Theory of Desire: A 10-year retrospective and implications for addiction treatments,” Addictive Behaviors, 44: 29–34. (Scholar)
  • McKoon, G., & R. Ratcliff, 1986, “Inferences about predictable events,” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 12: 82–91. (Scholar)
  • Michaelian, K., 2016, Mental Time Travel: Episodic Memory and Our Knowledge of the Personal Past, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Michotte, A., G. Thinés, G. Crabbé, 1964, “Les complements amodaux des structures perceptives” [Amodal completion of perceptial structures], in G. Thinés, A. Costall, G. Butterworth (eds.), Michotte’s experimental phenomenology of perception, Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, pp. 140–169. (Scholar)
  • Mok, J. N., D. Kwan, L. Green, J. Myerson, C. F. Craver, & R. S. Rosenbaum, 2020, “Is it Time? Episodic Imagining and the Discounting of Delayed and Probabilistic Rewards in Young and Older Adults,” Cognition, 199: 104222. (Scholar)
  • Nanay, B., 2013, Between Perception and Action, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015, “Perceptual content and the content of mental imagery,” Philosophical Studies, 172: 1723–1736. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017a, “Sensory substitution and multimodal mental imagery,” Perception, 46: 1014–1026. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017b, “Pain and mental imagery,” The Monist, 100: 485–500. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018a, “Multimodal mental imagery,” Cortex, 105: 125–134. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018b, “The importance of amodal completion in everyday perception,” i-Perception, 9 (4): 1–16. doi: 10.1177/204166951878887 (Scholar)
  • –––, 2021c, “Unconscious mental imagery,” Philosophical Transaction of the Royal Society B, 376 (1817): 20190689 (Scholar)
  • –––, 2021a, “Synesthesia as (multimodal) mental imagery,” Multisensory Research, 34: 281–296. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2021b, “Implicit bias as mental imagery,” Journal of the American Philosophical Association, 7: 329–347. (Scholar)
  • –––, forthcoming, Mental Imagery, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Noe, A., 2004, Action in Perception, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Noorman, S., D. A. Neville & I. Simanova, 2018, “Words affect visual perception by activating object shape representations,” Scientific Reports, 8: 14156 (Scholar)
  • Osuagwu, B. A. and A. Vuckovic, 2014, “Similarities between explicit and implicit motor imagery in mental rotation of hands: An EEG study,” Neuropsychologia, 65: 197–210. (Scholar)
  • Paivio, A., 1986, Mental representations: a dual coding approach, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1971, Imagery and Verbal Processes, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. (Scholar)
  • Pan, Y., M. Chen, J. Yin, X. An, X. Zhang, Y. Lu, H. Gong, W. Li, and W. Wang, 2012, “Equivalent representation of real and illusory contours in macaque V4,” The Journal of Neuroscience, 32: 6760–6770. (Scholar)
  • Parthasarathi, T., M. H. McConnell, J. Leury, and J. W. Kable, 2017, “The Vivid Present: Visualization Abilities Are Associated with Steep Discounting of Future Rewards,” Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 289. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00289 (Scholar)
  • Paulignan, Y., C. L. MacKenzie, R. G. Marteniuk, and M. Jeannerod, 1991, “Selective perturbation of visual input during prehension movements: 1. The effect of changing object position,” Experimental Brain Research, 83: 502–12. (Scholar)
  • Payne, K. B., 2001, “Prejudice and perception: The role of automatic and controlled processes in misperceiving a weapon,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81(2): 181–192. (Scholar)
  • Peacocke, C., 2019, The Primacy of Metaphysics, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Pearson, J. and S. M. Kosslyn, 2015, “The heterogeneity of mental representation: Ending the mental imagery debate,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences PNAS (PNAS), 112: 10089–10092. (Scholar)
  • Pearson, J., T. Naselaris, E. A. Holmes, and S. M. Kosslyn, 2015, “Mental Imagery: Functional Mechanisms and Clinical Applications,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19: 590–602. (Scholar)
  • Peck, T. C., S. Seinfeld, S. M. Aglioti and M. Slater, 2013, “Putting yourself in the skin of a black avatar reduces implicit racial bias,” Consciousness and Cognition, 22: 779–787. (Scholar)
  • Pekkola, J., V. Ojanen, T. Autti, I. P. Jaaskelainen, R. Mottonen, A. Tarkainen, & M. Sams, 2005, “Primary auditory cortex activation by visual speech: an fMRI study at 3 T,” NeuroReport, 16: 125–128. (Scholar)
  • Perky, C. W., 1910, “An Experimental Study of Imagination.” American Journal of Psychology, 21: 422–52. (Scholar)
  • Phelps, E. A., 2004, “Human Emotion and Memory: Interactions of the Amygdala and Hippocampal Complex,” Current Opinions in Neurobiology, 14: 198–202. (Scholar)
  • Phillips, I., 2014, “Lack of imagination: individual differences in mental imagery and the significance of consciousness,” in J. Kallestrup & M. Sprevak (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Mind, London: Palgrave Macmillan. (Scholar)
  • Ploghaus, A., I. Tracey, J.S. Cati, S. Clare, R.S. Menon, P.M. Matthews, and J.N.P. Rawlins, 1999, “Dissociating Pain from Its Anticipation in the Human Brain,” Science, 284: 1979–81. (Scholar)
  • Price, M. C., 2009, “Spatial forms and mental imagery,” Cortex, 45: 1229–1245. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2009.06.013 (Scholar)
  • Proust, M., 1913 [1928], Swann’s Way, C. K. Scott Moncrieff (trans.), New York: Modern Library, 1928. (Scholar)
  • Pylyshyn, Z., 1981, “The imagery debate: Analogue media versus tacit knowledge,” Psychological Review, 88: 16–45. (Scholar)
  • Ramachandran, V. S., D. Rogers-Ramachandran, and S. Cobb, 1995, “Touching the Phantom Limb,” Nature, 377: 489–90. (Scholar)
  • Rauschenberger, R. and S. Yantis, 2001, “Masking unveils pre-amodal completion representation in visual search,” Nature, 410: 369–372. (Scholar)
  • Reisberg , D., D. G. Pearson and S. M. Kosslyn, 2003, “Intuitions and introspections about imagery: The role of imagery experience in shaping an investigator’s theoretical views,” Journal of Applied Psychology, 17: 147–160. (Scholar)
  • Renier, L., O. Collignon, C. Poirier, D. Tranduy, A. Vanlierde, A. Bol, C. Veraart, A. De Volder, 2005, “Cross-modal activation visual cortex during depth perception using auditory substitution of vision,” Neuroimage, 26: 573–580. (Scholar)
  • Richardson, A., 1969, Mental Imagery, New York: Springer Publishing Company, Inc. (Scholar)
  • Ryle, G., 1949, The Concept of Mind, London: Huchinson. (Scholar)
  • Sartre, J.-P., 1940, L’Imaginaire, Paris: Gallimard
  • Sawamoto, N., M. Honda, T. Okada, T. Hanakawa, M. Kanda, H. Fukuyama, J. Konishi, and H. Shibasaki, 2000, “Expectation of Pain Enhances Responses to Nonpainful Somatosensory Stimulation in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Parietal Operculum/Posterior Insula: An Event-Related fMRI Study,” Journal of Neuroscience, 20: 7438–45. (Scholar)
  • Scanlon, T., 1998, What We Owe To Each Other, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Schroeder, T., 2004, Three Faces of Desire, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sekuler, A. B. & S. E. Palmer, 1992, “Perception of partly occluded objects: a microgenetic analysis,” Journal of Experimental Psychology General, 121: 95–111. (Scholar)
  • Sellars, W., 1978, “The role of imagination in Kant’s theory of experience,” in H. W. Johnstone (ed.), Categories: A Colloquium, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Shea, N., 2018, Representation in Cognitive Science, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Shepard, R. N. and J. Metzler, 1971, “Mental rotation of three- dimensional objects,” Science, 171: 701–703. (Scholar)
  • Simner, J., 2007, “Beyond perception: Synesthesia as a psycholinguistic phenomenon,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11: 23–29. (Scholar)
  • Spence, C. & O. Deroy, 2013, “Crossmodal imagery,” in S. Lacey and R. Lawson (eds.), Multisensory Imagery, New York: Springer, pp. 157–183. (Scholar)
  • Spiller, M. J. and A. S. Jansari, 2008, “Mental imagery and synaesthesia: Is synaesthesia from internally-generated stimuli possible?”, Cognition, 109: 143–151. (Scholar)
  • Spiller, M. J., C. N. Jonas, J. Simner and A. Jansari, 2015, “Beyond visual imagery: How modality-specific is enhanced mental imagery in synesthesia?”, Consciousness and Cognition, 31: 73–85. (Scholar)
  • Starr, G., 2013, Feeling Beauty: The Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience, Cambridge, MA, MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Statham, D. J., J. P. Connor, D. J. Kavanagh, G. F. X. Feeney, R. M. Young, J. May, & J. Andrade, 2011, “Measuring alcohol craving: Development of the Alcohol Craving Questionnaire,” Addiction, 6: 1230–1238. (Scholar)
  • Stokes, D., 2019, “Mental imagery and fiction,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 49: 731–754. (Scholar)
  • Strawson, P. F., 1974, “Imagination and Perception,” in P.F. Strawson, Freedom and Resentment, London: Methuen, pp. 45–65. (Scholar)
  • Talavage, T. M., M. I. Sereno, J. R. Melcher, P. J. Ledden, B. R. Rosen, A. M. Dale, 2004, “Tonotopic organization in human auditory cortex revealed by progressions of frequency sensitivity,” Journal of Neurophysiology, 91(3): 1282–96. (Scholar)
  • Thaler, L., S. Arnott, & M. Goodale, 2011, “Neural correlates of natural human echolocation in early and late blind echolocation experts,” PLoS ONE, 6(5): e20162. (Scholar)
  • Thorpe, S., D. Fize and C. Marlot, 1996, “Speed of processing in the human visual system,” Nature, 381: 520–522. (Scholar)
  • Tiffany, S. T., & D. M. Hakenewerth, 1991, “The production of smoking urges through an imagery manipulation: Psychophysiological and verbal manifestations,” Addictive Behaviors, 16: 389–400. (Scholar)
  • Tiffany, S. T., & D. J. Drobes, 1990, “Imagery and smoking urges: the manipulation of affective content,” Addictive Behaviors, 15: 531–539. (Scholar)
  • Titchener, E. B., 1909, Lectures on the Experimental Psychology of the Thought-Processes, New York: Macmillan. (Scholar)
  • Trope, Y., & N. Liberman, 2003, “Temporal construal,” Psychological Review, 110: 403–421. (Scholar)
  • Tulving, E., 1972, “Episodic and semantic memory,” in E. Tulving & W. Donaldson (eds.), Organization of memory, Cambridge, MA: Academic Press, pp. 382–403. (Scholar)
  • Tye, M., 1991, The Imagery Debate, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Van Leeuwen, N., 2011, “Imagination is where the action is,” Journal of Philosophy, 108: 55–77. (Scholar)
  • Van Leeuwen, N., 2016, “The Imaginative Agent,” in A. Kind & P. Kung (eds.), Knowledge Through Imagination, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 85–109. (Scholar)
  • van Lier R. and V. Ekroll, 2020, “A conceptual playground between perception and cognition: Introduction to the special issue on amodal completion,” i-Perception, 11(4): 1-4. (Scholar)
  • Versland, A. and H. Rosenberg, 2007, “Effect of brief imagery interventions on craving in college student smokers,” Addiction Research Theory, 15(2): 177–187. (Scholar)
  • Vetter P., F. W. Smith, L. Muckli, 2014, “Decoding sound and imagery content in early visual cortex,” Current Biology, 24: 1256–1262. (Scholar)
  • Volz, M. S., V. Suarez-Contreras, A.L. Santos Portilla, and F. Fregni, 2015, “Mental Imagery-Induced Attention Modulates Pain Perception and Cortical Excitability,” BMC Neuroscience, 16: 15. (Scholar)
  • Wheeler, M., S. Peterson, and R. Buckner, 2000, “Memory’s Echo: Vivid Remembering Reactivates Sensory-Specific Cortex,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences PNAS (PNAS), 97(20): 11125–11129. (Scholar)
  • Wiltsher, N., 2016, “Against the additive view of imagination,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 94: 266–282. (Scholar)
  • Wundt, W., 1912, An Introduction to Psychology, 2nd edition, New York: Macmillan. (Scholar)
  • Yates, F., 1966, The Art of Memory, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Yeshurun, Y. and M. Carrasco, 1998, “Attention improves or impairs visual performance by enhancing spatial resolution,” Nature, 396: 72–75. (Scholar)
  • Yokosawa, K., S. Pamilo, L. Hirvenkari, R. Hari, & E. Pihko, 2013, “Activation of auditory cortex by anticipating and hearing emotional sounds: an MEG study,” PLoS ONE, 8(11): e80284. (Scholar)
  • Yolton, J. W., 1996, Perception and Reality: A History from Descartes to Kant, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Yonelinas, A. P. and M. Ritchey, 2015, “The Slow Forgetting of Emotional Episodic Memories,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19: 259–267. (Scholar)
  • Young, B., 2020, “Olfactory imagery,” Philosophical Studies, 177: 3303–3327. (Scholar)
  • Young, B. and B. Nanay, forthcoming, “Olfactory amodal completion,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly. (Scholar)
  • Zatorre, R. J. and A. R. Halpern, 2005, “Mental concert: Musical imagery and auditory cortex,” Neuron, 47: 9–12. (Scholar)
  • Zeman, A. Z. J., S. Della Sala, L. A. Torrens, V-E. Gountouna, D. J. McGonigle, R. H. Logie, 2010, “Loss of imagery phenomenology with intact visuo-spatial task performance: A case of ‘blind imagination,” Neuropsychologia, 48: 145–155. (Scholar)
  • Zeman, A., F. Milton, S. Della Sala, M. Dewar, T. Frayling, J. Gaddum, A. Hattersley, B. Heuerman-Williamson, K. Jones, M. MacKisack, C. Winlove, 2020, “Phantasia – The Psychological Significance of Lifelong Visual Imagery Vividness Extremes,” Cortex, 130: 426–440. (Scholar)

Generated Sun Dec 4 13:39:25 2022