Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Neo-Daoism" by Alan Chan

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

  • Balazs, Etienne, 1964, “Nihilistic Revolt or Mystical Escapism: Currents of Thought in China during the Third Century A.D,” in Chinese Civilization and Bureaucracy, H. M. Wright, trans. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, pp. 226–254. (Scholar)
  • Bauer, Wolfgang, 1976, China and the Search for Happiness: Recurring Themes in Four Thousand Years of Chinese Cultural History, Trans., Michael Shaw. New York: Seabury Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1985, “The Hidden Hero: Creation and Disintegration of the Ideal of Eremitism,” in Individualism and Holism: Studies in Confucian and Taoist Values, Donald Munro, ed. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, pp. 157–197. (Scholar)
  • Berkowitz, Alan J., 2000, Patterns of Disengagement: The Practice and Portrayal of Reclusion in Early Medieval China, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cai, Zong-qi (ed.), 2004, Chinese Aesthetics: The Ordering of Literature, the Arts, and the Universe in the Six Dynasties, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Campany, Robert Ford, 2009, Making Transcendents: Ascetics and Social Memory in Early Medieval China, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Chan, Alan K. L., 1991, Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and Ho-shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-tzu, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Zhong Hui's Laozi Commentary and the Debate on Capacity and Nature in Third-Century China,” Early China, 28: 101–159. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “What are the Four Roots of Capacity and Nature?” in Wisdom in China and the West, Vincent Shen and Willard Oxtoby, eds. Washington: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, pp. 143–184. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, “The Nature of the Sage and the Emotions: A Debate in Wei-Jin Philosophy Revisited,” Journal for Chinese Philosophy and Culture, 2: 196–226. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Do Sages Have Emotions?” In Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect, Vincent Shen and Kwong-loi Shun, eds. Washington: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, pp. 113–135. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010, “Sage Nature and the Logic of Namelessness: Reconstructing He Yan's Explication of Dao,” In Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China, Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-keung Lo, eds. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, pp. 23–52. (Scholar)
  • Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (eds.), 2010, Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (eds.), 2010, Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • Chan, Timothy Wai Keung, 2012, Considering the End: Mortality in Early Medieval Chinese Poetic Representation, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Chan, Wing-tsit, 1963, A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Chen Bojun, 1987, Ruan Ji ji jiaozhu (Critical Edition of Ruan Ji's Collected Works), Beijing: Zhonghua shuju. (Scholar)
  • Chennault, Cynthia Louise, and Keith Nathaniel Knapp, Alan J. Berkowitz, Albert E. Dien (eds.), 2014. Early Medieval Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley. (Scholar)
  • Dai Mingyang, 1962, Ji Kang ji jiaozhu (Critical Edition of Ji Kang's Collected Works), Beijing: Renmin chubanshe. (Scholar)
  • De Crespigny, Rafe, 1991, “The Three Kingdoms and Western Jin: A History of China in the Third Century A.D,” East Asian History, 1 (June): 1–36, and 2 (December): 143–164 [Preprint available online]. (Scholar)
  • Dien, Albert E., 2007, Six Dynasties Civilization, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1990, State and Society in Early Medieval China, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Farmer, J. Michael, 2007, The Talent of Shu: Qiao Zhou and the Intellectual World of Early Medieval Sichuan, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Fung, Yu-lan, 1983, A History of Chinese Philosophy, Trans. Derk Bodde. Vol. 2. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1975, Chuang Tzu, A New Selected Translation with an Exposition of the Philosophy of Kuo Hsiang, Shanghai: Commercial Press, 1933; reprinted, New York: Gordon Press, 1975. (Scholar)
  • Graham, A.C., 1960, The Book of Lieh-tzu, London: A Murray. (Scholar)
  • Henricks, Robert G. (trans.), 1983, Philosophy and Argumentation in Third-Century China: The Essays of Hsi K'ang, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1981, “Hsi K'ang and Argumentation in the Wei,” Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 8: 169–221. (Scholar)
  • Holzman, Donald, 1956, “Les sept sages de la forêt des bambous et la société de leur temps,”T'oung Pao, 44: 317–346. (Scholar)
  • Holzman, Donald., 1957, La vie et la pensée de Hi K'ang (223-262 Ap. J.C.), Leiden: E.J. Brill. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1976, Poetry and Politics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1980, “La poésie de Ji Kang,” Journal Asiatique, 248 (1–2): 107–177; and 248 (3–4): 323–378; reprinted in Holzman, Immortals, Festivals and Poetry in Medieval China, Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Variorum, 1998. (Scholar)
  • Holcombe, Charles, 1994, In the Shadow of the Han: Literati Thought and Society at the Beginning of the Southern Dynasties, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Knechtges, David R., 1982 (1987, 1996), Wen Xuan or Selections of Refined Literature, 3 Volumes, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Knechtges, David R., and Taiping Chang (eds.), 2010 (2013, 2014), Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature: A Reference Guide, 4 Vols., Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Knapp, Keith Nathaniel, 2005, Selfless Offspring: Filial Children and Social Order in Early Medieval China, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Knaul, Livia, 1985, “Kuo Hsiang and the Chuang-tzu,” Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 12: 429–447. (Scholar)
  • Kohn, Livia (ed.), 2000, Daoism Handbook, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, Early Chinese Mysticism: Philosophy and Soteriology in the Taoist Tradition, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kubozoe, Yoshifumi, 1991, “Japanese Research in Recent Years on the History of Wei, Chin and the Northern and Southern Dynasties,” Acta Asatica, 60 (Special Issue on Studies in the History of the Six Dynasties): 104–134. (Scholar)
  • Lin, Lizhen (ed.), 2005. Wei Jin Xuanxue yanjiu lunzhu mulu, 1884–2004 (Bibliography of Research on Xuanxue), 2 Vols., Taipei: Hanxue yanjiu zhongxin. (Scholar)
  • Lin, Paul J. (trans.), 1977, A Translation of Lao-tzu's Tao-te ching and Wang Pi's Commentary, Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. (Scholar)
  • Lou Yü-lieh, 1980, Wang Bi ji jiaoshi (Critical Edition of Wang Bi's Collected Works), 2 volumes, Beijing: Zhonghua shuju. (Scholar)
  • Lynn, Richard J. (trans.), 1994, The Classic of Changes: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1999, The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Makeham, John, 2003, Transmitters and Creators: Chinese Commentators and Commentaries on the Analects, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center. (Scholar)
  • Mather, Richard B., 1969, 1970, “The Controversy over Conformity and Naturalness during the Six Dynasties,” History of Religions, 9 (2–3): 160–180. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 2002, Shih-shuo Hsin-yü: A New Account of Tales of the World by Liu I-ch'ing with Commentary by Liu Chün, Second Edition, Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. (Scholar)
  • Pearce, Scott, Audrey Spiro, and Patricia Ebrey (eds.), 2001, Culture and Power in the Reconstitution of the Chinese Realm, 200–600, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center. (Scholar)
  • Richter, Antje, 2013, Letters and Epistolary Culture in Early Medieval China, Seattle: University of Washington Press. (Scholar)
  • Robinet, Isabelle, 1977, Les Commentaires du Tao To King jusqu'au VIIesiècle, Paris: Universitaires de France. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1983, “Kouo Siang ou le monde comme absolu,” T'oung Pao, 69: 73–107. (Scholar)
  • Rump, Ariane, and Wing-tsit Chan (trans.), 1979, Commentary on the Lao-tzu by Wang Pi, Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. (Scholar)
  • Sailey, Jay, 1978, The Master who Embraces Simplicity: A Study of the Philosopher Ko Hung, A.D. 283–343, San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center. (Scholar)
  • Swartz, Wendy, and Robert Ford Campany, Yang Lu, and Jessey J. C. Choo (eds), 2014, Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook. New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Shih, Vincent Y.C. (trans.), 1959, The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons by Liu Hsieh: A Study of Thought and Pattern in Chinese Literature, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Shyrock, J. K. (trans.), 1966, The Study of Human Abilities: The Jen Wu Chih of Liu Shao, New Haven: American Oriental Society, 1937; reprinted, New York: Paragon. (Scholar)
  • T'ang Yung-t'ung, 1947, “Wang Pi's New Interpretation of the I Ching and the Lun-yü,” Walter Liebenthal (trans.), Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 10: 124–161. (Scholar)
  • Teng Ssu-yü, 1968, Family Instructions for the Yen Clan: Yen-shih Chia-hsün by Yen Chih-T'ui, Leiden: E. J. Brill. (Scholar)
  • Twitchett, D., and Loewe, M. (eds.), 1986, The Cambridge History of China, Volume 1: The Ch'in and Han Empires, 221 B.C.-A.D. 220, Chapter 16, “Philosophy and Religion from Han to Sui,” Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 808–878. (Scholar)
  • Van Gulik, Robert H. (trans.), 1968, Hsi K'ang and His Poetical Essay on the Lute, Tokyo: Sophia University, in cooperation with Charles E. Tuttle Company. (Scholar)
  • Wagner, Rudolf G., 2000, The Craft of a Chinese Commentator: Wang Bi on the Laozi, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003a, Language, Ontology, and Political Philosophy: Wang Bi's Scholarly Exploration of the Dark (Xuanxue), Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003b, A Chinese Reading of the Daodejing: Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • Yoshikawa, Tadao, 1991, “Scholarship in Ching-chou at the End of the Later Han Dyansty,”Acta Asiatica, 60: 1–24. (Scholar)
  • Yü Ying-shih, 1985, “Individualism and the Neo-Taoist Movement in Wei-Chin China,” in Individualism and Holism: Studies in Confucian and Taoist Values, Donald Munro, ed. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, pp. 121–155. (Scholar)
  • Ziporyn, Brook, 1993, “The Self-so and its Traces in the Thought of Guo Xiang,” Philosophy East and West, 43: 511–539. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, The Penumbra Unbound: The Neo-Taoist Philosophy of Guo Xiang, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 2009, Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries, Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, Ironies of Oneness and Difference: Coherence in Early Chinese Thought; Prolegomena to the Study of Li, Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, Beyond Oneness and Difference: Li and Coherence in Chinese Buddhist Thought and its Antecedents. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. (Scholar)

Generated Sun Dec 10 08:52:11 2017