Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Plato’s Aesthetics" by Nickolas Pappas

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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  • Annas, Julia, 1982. “Plato on the Triviality of Literature,” in Moravcsik and Temko 1982, pp. 1–28. (Scholar)
  • Asmis, Elizabeth, 1986. “Psychagogia in Plato’s Phaedrus,” Illinois Classical Studies, 11: 153–172. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992. “Plato on Poetic Creativity,” in Richard Kraut (ed.), 1992, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 338–364. (Scholar)
  • Barney, Rachel, 2010. “Notes on Plato on the kalon and the Good,” Classical Philology, 105: 363–377. (Scholar)
  • Belfiore, Elizabeth, 1984. “A Theory of Imitation in Plato’s Republic,” Transactions of the American Philological Association, 114: 121–146. (Scholar)
  • Benitez, Rick and Keping Wang (eds.), 2016. Reflections on Plato’s Poetics: Essays from Beijing, Berrima, Australia: Academic Printing & Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Bremmer, Jan N., 2013. “The Agency of Greek and Roman Statues,” Opuscula, 6: 7–21. (Scholar)
  • Burkert, Walter, 1985. Greek Religion, translated by John Raffan, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Capra, Andrea, 2015. Plato’s Four Muses: The Phaedrus and the Poetics of Philosophy, Washington DC: Center for Hellenic Studies. (Scholar)
  • Collins, Derek, 2003. “Nature, Cause, and Agency in Greek Magic,” Transactions of the American Philological Association, 133(1): 17–49. (Scholar)
  • Cooper, John (ed.), 1997. Plato: Complete Works, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • Cunningham, Valentine, 2007. “Why Ekphrasis?” Classical Philology, 102(1): 57–71. (Scholar)
  • Demand, Nancy, 1975. “Plato and the Painters,” Phoenix, 29: 1–20. (Scholar)
  • Destrée, Pierre, and Fritz-Gregor Herrmann (eds.), 2011. Plato and the Poets, Leiden and Boston: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Dyson, M., 1988. “Poetic Imitation in Plato’s Republic 3,” Antichthon, 22: 42–53. (Scholar)
  • Else, Gerald F., 1986. Plato and Aristotle on Poetry, edited with introduction and notes by Peter Burias, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. (Scholar)
  • Faraone, Christopher A., 1992. Talismans and Trojan Horses: Guardian Statues in Ancient Greek Myth and Ritual, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ferrari, Giovanni, 1987. Listening to the Cicadas: A study of Plato’s Phaedrus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Francis, James A., 2009. “Metal Maidens, Achilles’ Shield, and Pandora: The Beginnings of ‘Ekphrasis,’” American Journal of Philology, 130(1): 1–23. (Scholar)
  • Golden, Leon, 1975. “Plato’s Concept of Mimesis,” British Journal of Aesthetics, 15: 118–131. (Scholar)
  • Gonzalez, Francisco J., 2011. “The Hermeneutics of Madness: Poet and Philosopher in Plato’s Ion and Phaedrus,” in Destrée and Herrmann 2011, pp. 93–110. (Scholar)
  • González, José M., 2013. The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft: Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective, Washington, DC: Center for Hellenic Studies. (Scholar)
  • Gould, Thomas, 1990. The Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Guyer, Paul, 1993. “The Dialectic of Disinterestedness: I. Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics,” in Kant and the Experience of Freedom, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Halliwell, Stephen, 1984. “Plato and Aristotle on the Denial of Tragedy,” Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, 30: 49–71. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988. Plato Republic Book 10: With introduction, translation, and commentary, Oxford: Aris & Phillips. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002. The Aesthetics of Mimesis: Ancient Texts and Modern Problems, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Havelock, Eric, 1963. Preface to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hyland, Drew, 2008. Plato and the Question of Beauty, Bloomington: University of Indiana Press. (Scholar)
  • Janaway, Christopher, 1992. “Craft and Fineness in Plato’s Ion,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 10: 1–23. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995. Images of Excellence: Plato’s critique of the arts, Oxford: Oxford University Press; and see the review by Dabney Townsend, Philosophical Quarterly, 189 (1997): 533–536. (Scholar)
  • Keuls, Eva, 1974. “Plato on Painting,” The American Journal of Philology, 95: 100–127. (Scholar)
  • Konstan, David, 2014. Beauty: The Fortunes of an Ancient Greek Idea, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015. “Beauty,” in Pierre Destrée and Penelope Murray (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Aesthetics, Hoboken NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 366–380. (Scholar)
  • Kosman, Aryeh, 2010. “Beauty and the Good: Situating the Kalon,” Classical Philology, 105: 341–357. (Scholar)
  • Kraut, Richard (ed.), 1992. The Cambridge Companion to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lear, Gabriel Richardson, 2010. “Response to Kosman,” Classical Philology, 105: 357–362. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011. “Mimesis and Psychological Change in Republic III,” in Destrée and Herrmann 2011, pp. 195–216. (Scholar)
  • Lear, Jonathan, 1992. “Inside and Outside the Republic,” Phronesis, 37: 184–215. (Scholar)
  • Ledbetter, Grace, 2003. Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and authority in early Greek theories of poetry, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lombroso, Cesare, 1891. The Man of Genius, London: Walter Scott. (Scholar)
  • Marušič, Jera, 2011. “Poets and Mimesis in the Republic,” in Destrée and Herrmann 2011, pp. 217–240. (Scholar)
  • Moravcsik, Julius, and Philip Temko (eds.), 1982. Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts, Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Moss, Jessica, 2007. “What is Imitative Poetry and Why is it Bad?” in G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato’s Republic, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 415–444. (Scholar)
  • Most, Glenn W., 2011. “What Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry?” in Destrée and Herrmann 2011, pp. 1–20. (Scholar)
  • Murdoch, Iris, 1977. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato banished the artists, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Murray, Penelope, 1981. “Poetic Inspiration in Early Greece,” Journal of Hellenic Studies, 101: 87–100. (Scholar)
  • Naddaff, Ramona, 2002. Exiling the Poets: The Production of Censorship in Plato’s Republic, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Nehamas, Alexander, 1982. “Plato on Imitation and Poetry in Republic 10,” in Moravcsik and Temko 1982, pp. 47–78. (Scholar)
  • Nehamas, Alexander, and Paul Woodruff (trans.), 1989. Plato: Symposium, with introduction and notes, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1995. Plato: Phaedrus, with introduction and notes, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • Notomi, Noburu, 2011. “Image-Making in Republic X and the Sophist: Plato’s Criticism of the Poet and the Sophist,” in Destrée and Herrmann 2011, pp. 299–326. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1980. “Aristophanes and Socrates on Learning Practical Wisdom,” Yale Classical Studies, 26: 433–97. (Scholar)
  • Pappas, Nickolas, 1989. “Plato’s Ion: The problem of the author,” Philosophy, 64: 381–389. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999. “Mimêsis in Aristophanes and Plato,” Philosophical Inquiry, 21: 61–78. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012a. “Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration?Philosophy Compass, 10: 1–10. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012b. Review of James I. Porter, The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 70: 323–326. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013. “The Impiety of the Imitator in Republic 10,” Epoché, 17: 219–232. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015. “Women at the Gymnasium and Consent for the Republic’s City,” Dialogos, 98: 27–54. (Scholar)
  • Partee, Morriss Henry, 1971. “Inspiration in the Aesthetics of Plato,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 30: 87–95. (Scholar)
  • Petraki, Zacharoula, 2018. “Plato’s Metaphor of &rlquo;Shadow Painting’: Antithesis and ‘Participation’ in the Phaedo and the Republic,” Classical Journal, 114(1): 1–33. (Scholar)
  • Philip, J. A., 1961. “Mimesis in the Sophistês of Plato,” Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association, 92: 453–468. (Scholar)
  • Porter, James I., 2010. The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece: Matter, Sensation, and Experience, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Robinson, T. M., 2016. “Plato and the Arts,” in Benitez and Wang (eds.) 2016, pp. 13–24. (Scholar)
  • Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1840. “A Defense of Poetry,” in Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (ed.), Letters from Abroad, Translations, and Fragments, London: Edward Moxon, 1840. (Scholar)
  • Sider, David, 1977. “Plato’s Early Aesthetics: The Hippias Major,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 35: 465–470. (Scholar)
  • Sörbom, Göran, 1966. Mimesis and Art, Bonniers: Scandinavian University Books. (Scholar)
  • Stern-Gillet, Suzanne, 2004. “On (Mis)interpreting Plato’s Ion,” Phronesis, 49: 169–201. (Scholar)
  • Tigerstedt, Eugene, 1969. Plato’s Idea of Poetical Inspiration, Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1970. “Furor Poeticus: Poetic inspiration in Greek literature before Democritus and Plato,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 31: 163–178. (Scholar)
  • Verdenius, Willen Jacob, 1962. Mimesis: Plato’s doctrine of artistic imitation and its meaning to us, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Vernant, Jean-Pierre, 2006. “The Figuration of the Invisible and the Psychological Category of the Double: The Kolossos,” in Myth and Thought among the Greeks, Janet Lloyd and Jeff Fort (trans.), New York: Zone Books, pp. 321–332. (Scholar)
  • Wang, Shuanghong, 2016. “The Muses’ Rhapsode: The Analogy of the Magnetic Stone in Plato’s Ion,” in Benitez and Wang (eds.) 2016, pp. 137–150. (Scholar)
  • White, F. C., 1989. “Love and Beauty in Plato’s Symposium,” Journal of Hellenic Studies, 109: 149–157. (Scholar)
  • Woodruff, Paul, 1982. “What Could Go Wrong with Inspiration? Why Plato’s poets fail,” in Moravcsik and Temko 1982, pp. 137–150. (Scholar)
  • Woodruff, Paul (trans.), 1983. Plato, Two Comic Dialogues: Ion and Hippias Major, with introduction and notes, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)

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