Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry" by Charles L. Griswold

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  • Adams, J. C., 1996, “The Rhetorical Significance of the Conversion of the Lover’s Soul in Plato’s Phaedrus,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 26: 7–16. (Scholar)
  • Annas, J., 1981, An Introduction to Plato’s Republic, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Annas, J. and C. J. Rowe (eds.), 2002, New Perspectives on Plato, Modern and Ancient, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Asmis, E., 1986, “Psychagogia in Plato’s Phaedrus,” Illinois Classical Studies, 11: 153–72. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1992, “Plato on Poetic Creativity,” in The Cambridge Companion to Plato, R. Kraut (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 338–64. (Scholar)
  • Auerbach, E., 1953, Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature, trans. W. R. Trask, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ausland, H. W., 1997, “On reading Plato Mimetically,” American Journal of Philology, 118: 371–416. (Scholar)
  • Baracchi, C., 2001, “Beyond the Comedy and Tragedy of Authority: The Invisible Father in Plato’s Republic,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 34: 151–76. (Scholar)
  • Becker, A. S., 1993, “A Short Essay on Deconstruction and Plato’s Ion,” Electronic Antiquity, 1 [available online]. (Scholar)
  • Belfiore, E. S., 1983, “Plato’s Greatest Accusation against Poetry,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy (Supplementary Volume), 9: 39–62. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1984, “A Theory of Imitation in Plato’s Republic,” Transactions of the American Philological Association, 114: 121–46. (Scholar)
  • Benardete, S., 1991, The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato’s Gorgias and Phaedrus, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Benitez, E., 1992, “Argument, Rhetoric and Philosophic Method: Plato’s Protagoras,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 25: 222–52. (Scholar)
  • Blondell, R., 2002, The Play of Character in Plato’s Dialogues, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Bloom, A. (trans.), 1968, The Republic of Plato, translated with notes and an interpretive essay, New York: Basic Books. (Scholar)
  • Booth, W., 1974, A Rhetoric of Irony, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Brogan, T. V. F., 1993, “Representation and Mimesis,” in The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, A. Preminger and T. V. F. Brogan (eds.), Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 1307–44. (Scholar)
  • Brownstein, O. L., 1965, “Plato’s Phaedrus: Dialectic as the Genuine Art of Speaking,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, 51: 392–98. (Scholar)
  • Burger, R., 1980, Plato’s Phaedrus: A Defense of a Philosophic Art of Writing, University: University of Alabama Press. (Scholar)
  • Burnet, J. (ed.), 1968, Respublica, in Platonis Opera, volume IV, Oxford: Clarendon. (Scholar)
  • Burnyeat, M., 1999, “Culture and Society in Plato’s Republic,” Tanner Lectures on Human Values, 20: 217–324. (Scholar)
  • Calvert, B., 1984, “The Politicians of Athens in the Gorgias and Meno,” History of Political Thought, 5: 1–15. (Scholar)
  • Calvo, T., 1992, “Socrates’ First Speech in the Phaedrus and Plato’s Criticism of Rhetoric,” in Understanding the Phaedrus, L. Rossetti (ed.), Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag, pp. 47–60. (Scholar)
  • Capra, A., 2015, Plato’s Four Muses: the Phaedrus and the Poetics of Philosophy (Hellenic Studies Series 67), Washington, DC, and Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Clay, D., 2000, Platonic Questions: Dialogues with the Silent Philosopher, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cole, T., 1991, The Origins of Rhetoric in Ancient Greece, Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cooper, J. M., 1985, “Plato, Isocrates and Cicero on the Independence of Oratory from Philosophy,” in Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy (Volume 1), J. Cleary (ed.), Lanham, MD: University Press of America, pp. 77–96. (Scholar)
  • Cooper, J. M. and D. S. Hutchinson (eds.), 1997, Plato: Complete Works, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • Corbett, E. P. J., 1990, Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student, 3rd edition, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Corrigan, K. and E. Glazov-Corrigan, 2004, Plato’s Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in the Symposium, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Curran, J. V., 1986, “The Rhetorical Technique of Plato’s Phaedrus,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 19: 66–72. (Scholar)
  • Destrée, P. and F.-G. Herrmann (eds.), 2011, Plato and the Poets. Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Duffy, B. K., 1983, “The Platonic Functions of Epideictic Rhetoric,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 16: 79–93. (Scholar)
  • Dyson, M., 1988, “Poetic Imitation in Plato’s Republic 3,” Antichthon, 22: 42–53. (Scholar)
  • Eades, T., 1996, “Plato, Rhetoric, and Silence,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 29: 244–58. (Scholar)
  • Elias, J. A., 1984, Plato’s Defence of Poetry, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Else, G. F., 1986, Plato and Aristotle on Poetry, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. (Scholar)
  • Erickson, K. V. (ed.), 1979, Plato: True and Sophistic Rhetoric, Amsterdam: Rodopi. (Scholar)
  • Farness, J., 1991, Missing Socrates: Problems of Plato’s Writing, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fendt, G. and D. Rozema, 1998, Platonic Errors: Plato, a Kind of Poet, Westport: Greenwood Press. (Scholar)
  • Ferber, R., 1991, Die Unwissenheit des Philosophen oder Warum hat Plato die ‘ungeschriebene Lehre’ nicht geschrieben? Sankt Augustin: Academia. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, Warum hat Platon die ‘ungeschriebene Lehre’ nicht geschrieben?, Munich: C. H. Beck Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Ferrari, G. R. F., 1989, “Plato and Poetry,” in The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism (Volume I), G. A. Kennedy (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 92–148. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato’s Phaedrus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Socratic Irony as Pretence,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 34: 1–33. (Scholar)
  • Freyberg, B., 1997, The Play of the Platonic Dialogues, New York: Peter Lang Publishing. (Scholar)
  • Fritz, J. H., 2016, Plato and the Elements of Dialogue, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. (Scholar)
  • Fussi, A., 2000, “Why is the Gorgias so Bitter?” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 33: 39–58. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, “The Myth of the Last Judgment in the Gorgias,” Review of Metaphysics, 54: 529–52. (Scholar)
  • Gadamer, H.-G., 1980, “Plato and the Poets,” in Dialogue and Dialectic: Eight Hermeneutical Studies on Plato, P. C. Smith (trans.), New Haven: Yale University Press, pp. 39–72. (Scholar)
  • Gifford, M., 2001, “Dramatic Dialectic in Republic Book I,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 20: 35–106. (Scholar)
  • Gill, C. and M. M. McCabe (eds.), 1996, Form and Argument in Late Plato, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Gordon, J., 1999, Turning Toward Philosophy: Literary Device and Dramatic Structure in Plato’s Dialogues, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gottfried, B., 1993, “Pan, the Cicadas, and Plato’s use of Myth in the Phaedrus,” in Plato’s Dialogues: New Studies and Interpretations, G. A. Press (ed.), Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 179–95. (Scholar)
  • Gould, T., 1990, The Ancient Quarrel between Poetry and Philosophy, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Greene, W. C., 1918, “Plato’s view of Poetry,” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, 29: 1–75. (Scholar)
  • Griswold, C. L., 1981, “The Ideas and the Criticism of Poetry in Plato’s Republic, Book 10,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 19: 135–50. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996 [1986], Self-Knowledge in Plato’s Phaedrus, second edition, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press; first edition, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999a, “Relying on Your Own Voice: An Unsettled Rivalry of Moral Ideals in Plato’s Protagoras,” Review of Metaphysics, 53: 283–307. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999b, “E Pluribus Unum? On the Platonic ‘Corpus’,” Ancient Philosophy, 19: 361–97. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002a, “Irony in the Platonic Dialogues,” Philosophy and Literature, 26: 84–106. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002b, “Plato’s Metaphilosophy: Why Plato Wrote Dialogues,” in Griswold (ed.) 2002 [1988]: 143–67. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 2002 [1988], Platonic Writings, Platonic Readings, second edition, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press; first edition, New York: Routledge, 1988. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Reading and Writing Plato,” Philosophy and Literature, 32: 205–216. Article review of: R. Blondell, The Play of Character in Plato’s Dialogues, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002; K. Corrigan and E. Glazov-Corrigan, Plato’s Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in the Symposium, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004; D. Hyland, Questioning Platonism: Continental Interpretations of Plato, Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004; D. Nails, The People of Plato: a Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, Indianapolis: Hackett, 2002. (Scholar)
  • Hackforth, R., 1972, Plato’s Phaedrus, translation with introduction and commentary, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Halliwell, S., 2000a, “Plato and Painting,” in Word and Image in Ancient Greece, K. Rutter and B. Sparkes (eds.), Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 99–116. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2000b, “The Subjection of Muthos to Logos: Plato’s Citations of the Poets,” Classical Quarterly, 50: 94–112. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, The Aesthetics of Mimesis: Ancient Texts and Modern Problems, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “An Aristotelian perspective on Plato’s dialogues,” in New Essays on Plato: Language and Thought in Fourth-Century Greek Philosophy, F-G. Herrmann (ed.), Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, pp. 189–211. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Antidotes and Incantations: Is there a Cure for Poetry in Plato’s Republic?,” in Plato and the Poets, P. Destrée and F.-G. Herrmann (eds.), Leiden: Brill, pp. 241–66. (Scholar)
  • Havelock, E., 1982, Preface to Plato, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Howland, J. A., 1992, “Philosophy as Dialogue,” Reason Papers, 17: 113–34. (Review article.) (Scholar)
  • Hyland, D., 1995, Finitude and Transcendence in the Platonic Dialogues, Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, Questioning Platonism: Continental Interpretations of Plato, Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, Plato and the Question of Beauty, Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hwang, P. H., 1981, “Poetry in Plato’s Republic,” Apeiron, 15: 29–37. (Scholar)
  • Irwin, T. H., 1996, “Art and Philosophy in Plato’s Dialogues,” Phronesis, 41: 335–50. (Review article.) (Scholar)
  • Jannaway, C., 1995, Images of Excellence: Plato’s Critique of the Arts, Oxford: Clarendon Press. (Scholar)
  • Kahn, C. H., 1983, “Drama and Dialectic in Plato’s Gorgias,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 1: 75–121. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, Plato and the Socratic Dialogue: The Philosophical Use of a Literary Form, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kastely, J. L., 1991, “In Defense of Plato’s Gorgias,” PMLA, 106: 96–109. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, Rethinking the Rhetorical Tradition: from Plato to Postmodernism, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, “Respecting the Rupture: Not Solving the Problem of Unity in Plato’s Phaedrus,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 35: 138–52. (Scholar)
  • Kauffman, C., 1979, “Enactment as Argument in the Gorgias,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 12: 114–29. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1982, “The Axiological Foundations of Plato’s Theory of Rhetoric,” Communication Studies, 33: 353–66. (Scholar)
  • Kerferd, G. B., 1974, “Plato’s Treatment of Callicles in the Gorgias,” Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, 20: 48–52. (Scholar)
  • Kerch, T., 2008, “Plato’s Menexenus: a Paradigm of Rhetorical Flattery,” Polis, 25: 94–114. (Scholar)
  • Klagge, J. C., and N. D. Smith (eds.), 1992, Methods of Interpreting Plato and his Dialogues, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, suppl. vol. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Klemm, D. E., 1989, “Gorgias, Law and Rhetoric,” Iowa Law Review, 74: 819–26. (Scholar)
  • Klosko, G., 1984, “The Refutation of Callicles in Plato’s Gorgias,” Greece & Rome, 31: 126–39. (Scholar)
  • Kobusch, T. and B. Mojsisch (eds.), 1996, Platon: seine Dialoge in der Sicht neuer Forschungen, Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. (Scholar)
  • Koritansky, J. C., 1987, “Socratic Rhetoric and Socratic Wisdom in Plato’s Phaedrus,” Interpretation, 15: 29–53. (Scholar)
  • Kraut, R., 1992, “Introduction to the Study of Plato,” in The Cambridge Companion to Plato, R. Kraut (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–50. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1997, Plato’s Republic: Critical Essays, Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Kuhn, H., 1941/1942, “The True Tragedy: On the Relationship between Greek Tragedy and Plato,” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, part 1, 52: 1–40 and part 2, 53: 37–88. (Scholar)
  • Lane, M., 2006, “The Evolution of eironeia in Classical Greek Texts: why Socratic eironeia is not Socratic Irony,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 31: 49–83. (Scholar)
  • Lear, J., 1998, “Inside and Outside the Republic,” in Open Minded: Working out the Logic of the Soul, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, pp. 219–46. (Scholar)
  • Lewis, T. J., 1986, “Refutative Rhetoric as True Rhetoric in the Gorgias,” Interpretation, 14: 195–210. (Scholar)
  • Maranhao, T. (ed.), 1990, The Interpretation of Dialogue, Chicago: Chicago University Press. (Scholar)
  • Marback, R., 1999, Plato’s Dream of Sophistry, Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. (Scholar)
  • McComiskey, B., 1992, “Disassembling Plato’s Critique of Rhetoric in the Gorgias (447a-466a),” Rhetoric Review, 10: 205–16. (Scholar)
  • McCoy, M., 2008, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Michelini, A. (ed.), 2003, Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Miller, M. H., 1999, “Platonic Mimesis,” in Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue, T. M. Falkner, N. Felson, and D. Konstan (eds.), Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 253–66. (Scholar)
  • Moravcsik, J. and P. Temko (eds.), 1982, Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts, Totowa, NJ: Rowman and Littlefield. [Note: this volume contains a number of essays especially relevant to the theme of the present entry.] (Scholar)
  • Morgan, K., 2000, Myth and Philosophy from the Presocratics to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Morgan, M., 1990, “Plato and the Painters,” Apeiron, 23: 121–45. (Scholar)
  • Moss, J., 2007a, “The Doctor and the Pastry Chef: Pleasure and Persuasion in Plato’s Gorgias,” Ancient Philosophy, 27: 229–49. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007b, “What is Imitative Poetry and Why is it Bad?” in The Cambridge Companion to Plato’s Republic, G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 415–44. (Scholar)
  • Most, G. W., 1998, “Mimesis,” in the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Volume 6), E. Craig (ed.), London: Routledge, pp. 381–82. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “What Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry?,” in Plato and the Poets, P. Destrée and F.-G. Herrmann (eds.), Leiden: Brill, pp. 1–20. (Scholar)
  • Murray, J. S., 1988, “Disputation, Deception and Dialectic: Plato on the True Rhetoric (Phaedrus, 261–266),” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 21: 279–89. (Scholar)
  • Murray, P. (ed.), 1996, Plato on Poetry, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Nadaff, R. A., 2002, Exiling the Poets: the Production of Censorship in Plato’s Republic. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Nails, D., 2002, The People of Plato: a Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, Indianapolis: Hackett Press. (Scholar)
  • Nails, D. and H. Tarrant (eds.), 2015, Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato, Commentationes Humanarum Litterarum 132, Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. (Scholar)
  • Nehamas, A., 1998, The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Plato and the Mass Media,” in Virtues of Authenticity: Essays on Plato and Socrates, Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 279–99. (Scholar)
  • Nehamas, A., and P. Woodruff (trans.), 1997a, Plato’s Symposium, in Cooper and Hutchinson (eds.) 1997: 457–505. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1997b, Plato’s Phaedrus, in Cooper and Hutchinson (eds.) 1997: 506–556. (Scholar)
  • Nightingale, A. W., 1995, Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Notomi, N., 2011, “Image-Making in Republic X and the Sophist,” in Plato and the Poets, P. Destrée and F.-G. Herrmann (eds.), Leiden: Brill, pp. 299–326. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, M. C., 1986, The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, Love’s Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Osborne, C., 1987, “The Repudiation of Representation in Plato’s Republic and its Repercussions,” Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, 33: 53–73. (Scholar)
  • Partee, M. H., 1970, “Plato’s Banishment of Poetry,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 29(2): 209–22. (Scholar)
  • Petruzzi, A. P., 1996, “Rereading Plato’s Rhetoric,” Rhetoric Review, 15: 5–25. (Scholar)
  • Planinc, Z., 2003, Plato through Homer: Poetry and Philosophy in the Cosmological Dialogues, Columbia: University of Missouri Press. (Scholar)
  • Press, G. A. (ed.) 1993, Plato’s Dialogues: New Studies and Interpretations, Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. (Scholar)
  • Quimby, R. W., 1974, “The Growth of Plato’s Perception of Rhetoric,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 7: 71–9. (Scholar)
  • Ramsey, R. E., 1999, “A Hybrid Techne of the Soul?: Thoughts on the Relation between Philosophy and Rhetoric in Gorgias and Phaedrus,” Rhetoric Review, 17: 247–62. (Scholar)
  • Rendall, S., 1977, “Dialogue, Philosophy, and Rhetoric: The Example of Plato’s Gorgias,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 10: 165–79. (Scholar)
  • Ricoeur, P., 1981, “Mimesis and Representation,” Annals of Scholarship, 2: 15–32. (Scholar)
  • Rocco, C., 1996, “Liberating Discourse: the Politics of Truth in Plato’s Gorgias,” Interpretation, 23: 361–85. (Scholar)
  • Roochnik, D., 1987, “The Erotics of Philosophical Discourse,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 4: 117–29. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991a, “In Defense of Plato: A Short Polemic,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 24: 153–58. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1991b, “Stanley Fish and the Old Quarrel between Rhetoric and Philosophy,” Critical Review, 5: 225–46. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1995, “Socrates’ Rhetorical Attack on Rhetoric,” in The Third Way: New Directions in Platonic Studies, F. Gonzales (ed.), Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 81–94. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1996, Of Art and Wisdom: Plato’s Understanding of Techne, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, Beautiful City: The Dialectical Character of Plato’s Republic, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Rosen, S., 1965, “The Role of Eros in Plato’s Republic,” Review of Metaphysics, 18: 452–75. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1968, Plato’s Symposium, New Haven: Yale University Press; reprinted, South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press: 1999. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1987, Hermeneutics as Politics, New York: Oxford University Press; reprinted, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988, The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry, New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall. (Scholar)
  • Rossetti, L. (ed.), 1992, Understanding the Phaedrus: Proceedings of the II Symposium Platonicum, Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag. (Scholar)
  • Rowe, C. J., 1986, Plato: Phaedrus, with translation and commentary, Warminster, England: Aris and Phillips. (Scholar)
  • Rutherford, R. B., 1995, The Art of Plato: Ten Essays in Platonic Interpretation, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ryan, E. E., 1979, “Plato’s Gorgias and Phaedrus and Aristotle’s Theory of Rhetoric: A Speculative Account,” Athenaeum, 57: 452–61. (Scholar)
  • Sallis, J., 1996, Being and Logos: Reading the Platonic Dialogues, 3rd edition, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, Platonic Legacies, Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Sayre, K., 1995, Plato’s Literary Garden: How to Read a Platonic Dialogue, Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press. (Scholar)
  • Schiappa, E., 1990, “Did Plato Coin Rhetorike?” American Journal of Philology, 111: 457–70. (Scholar)
  • Schultz, A.-M., 2013, Plato’s Socrates as Narrator: A Philosophical Muse, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. (Scholar)
  • Scully, S., 2003, Plato’s Phaedrus, translation with notes, glossary, appendices, Interpretative Essay and Introduction, Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “Measured Speech in Plato’s Phaedrus,” in Antiphilesis: Studies in Classical, Byzantine, and Modern Greek Literature and Culture (In Honour of John-Theophanes A. Papademetriou), E. Karamalengou and E. Makrygianni (eds.), Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag, pp. 286–92. (Scholar)
  • Spariosu, M., 1984, “Mimesis and Contemporary French Theory,” in Mimesis in Contemporary Theory: An Interdisciplinary Approach, M. Spariosu (ed.), Philadelphia: John Benjamins, pp. 65–108. (Scholar)
  • Stauffer, D., 2006, The Unity of Plato’s Gorgias: Rhetoric, Justice, and the Philosophic Life, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sullivan, D. L., 1992, “Kairos and the Rhetoric of Belief,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, 78: 317–32. (Scholar)
  • Tate, J., 1928, “‘Imitation’ in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Quarterly, 22: 16–23. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1932, “Plato and ‘Imitation’,” Classical Quarterly, 26: 161–69. (Scholar)
  • Thomas, Dylan, 1954, “On Poetry,” in his Quite Early One Morning, New York: New Directions. (Scholar)
  • Urmson, J. O., 1997, “Plato and the Poets,” reprinted in Plato’s Republic: Critical Essays, R. Kraut (ed.), Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 223–34. (Scholar)
  • Versenyi, L., 1970–71, “The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry,” Philosophical Forum, 2: 200–12. (Scholar)
  • Vicenzo, J. P., 1992, “Socrates and Rhetoric: The Problem of Nietzsche’s Socrates,” Philosophy and Rhetoric, 25: 162–82. (Scholar)
  • Vlastos, G., 1991, Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • ––– (ed.), 1971,The Philosophy of Socrates: A Collection of Critical Essays, Garden City: Anchor Books/Doubleday. (Scholar)
  • Wardy, R., 1996, The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato and their Successors, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Werner, D. S., 2012, Myth and Philosophy in Plato’s Phaedrus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • White, N. P. (trans.), 1997, Plato’s Sophist, in Cooper and Hutchinson (eds.) 1997: 235–293. (Scholar)
  • White, D. A., 1993, Rhetoric and Reality in Plato’s Phaedrus, Albany: State University of New York Press. (Scholar)
  • Wolfsdorf, D., 2007, “The Irony of Socrates,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 65: 175–87. (Scholar)
  • Woodruff, P., 1998, “Plato on Mimesis,” in Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (Volume 3), M. Kelly (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 521–23. (Scholar)
  • ––– (trans.), 1997, Plato’s Ion, in Cooper and Hutchinson (eds.) 1997: 937–949. (Scholar)
  • Zeyl, D. (trans.), 1997, Plato’s Gorgias, in Cooper and Hutchinson (eds.) 1997: 791–869. (Scholar)
  • Zimbrich, U., 1984, Mimesis bei Platon, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang. (Scholar)

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