Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Seneca" by Katja Vogt

This is an automatically generated and experimental page

If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

This experiment has been authorized by the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The original article and bibliography can be found here.

Primary Literature

  • Braund, S. (ed.), 2009, Seneca: De Clementia, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Cooper, J. M. and Procopé, J. F. (ed. and trans.), 1995, Seneca: Moral and Political Essays, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, M. and Inwood, B. (tr.), 2011, Seneca: On Benefits, The Complete Works of Lucius Anneaus Seneca, ed. E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, and M. Nussbaum, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Hine, H. M. (ed.), 1996, L. Annaei Senecae Naturalium Quaestionum Libros, Stuttgart and Leipzig: Teubner. (Scholar)
  • Hine, H.H. (tr.), 2010, Seneca: Natural Questions, The Complete Works of Lucius Anneaus Seneca, ed. E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, and M. Nussbaum, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Inwood, B. (trans.), 2007, Seneca: Selected Philosophical Letters, with an introduction and commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kaster, R. and Nussbaum, M. (tr.), 2010, Seneca: Anger, Mercy, Revenge. The Complete Works of Lucius Anneaus Seneca, ed. E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, and M. Nussbaum, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Ker, J., Fantham, E., Hine, H.M., and Williams, G.D. (tr.), 2014, Seneca: Hardship and Happiness, ed. E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, and M. Nussbaum, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Reynolds L. D., (ed.), 1965, L. Annaei Senecae Ad Lucilium Epistulae Morales (Oxford Classical Texts), Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Reynolds, L. D. (ed.), 1977, L. Annaei Senecae Dialogorum libri duodecim, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Williams, G. (ed. and trans.), 2003, Seneca: De Otio and De Breuitate Vitae, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)

Secondary literature

  • Annas, J., 1993, The Morality of Happiness, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Asmis, E., 2009, “Seneca on fortune and the kingdom of god,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 115–138. (Scholar)
  • Barnes, J., 1997, Logic and the Imperial Stoa, Leiden and New York: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Bartsch, S., 2009, “Senecan metaphor and Stoic self-instruction,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 188–217. (Scholar)
  • Boys-Stones, G. 2013, “Seneca against Plato: Letters 58 and 65,” in ed. A.G. Long, Plato and the Stoics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 128–146. (Scholar)
  • Busch, A., 2009, “Dissolution of the self in the Senecan corpus,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 255–282. (Scholar)
  • Cooper, J. M., 1999, “Posidonius on Emotions”, in Cooper, Reason and Emotion. Essays on Ancient Moral Psychology and Ethical Theory, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 449–484. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2004, “Moral Theory and Moral Improvement: Seneca,” in Cooper, Knowledge, Nature, and the Good: Essays on Ancient Philosophy, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 309–334. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “The Emotional Life of the Wise,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 43: 176–218. (Scholar)
  • Dihle, A., 1982, The Theory of the Will in Classical Antiquity, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Donini, P.-L., 1979, Modelli Filosofici e Letterari: Lucrezia, Orazio, Seneca, Bologna: Pitagora Editrice. (Scholar)
  • –––,1982, Le scuole, l'anima, l'impero: la filosofia antica da Antioco a Platino, Turin: Rosemberg and Sellier. (Scholar)
  • Edwards, C., 1997, “Self-scrutiny and self-transformation in Seneca's Letters”, Greece & Rome, 44: 23–38. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “Free yourself! Slavery, freedom and the self in Seneca's Letters,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 139–159. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014,“Ethics V: Death and Time,” in eds. Damschen and A. Heil, Brill's Companion to Seneca, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 323–342. (Scholar)
  • Fantham, E., 1982, Seneca's Troades: a literary introduction with text, translation, and commentary, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fillion-Lahille, Janine, 1984, Le De Ira de Sénèque et La philosophie stoïcienne des passions, Paris: Klincksieck. (Scholar)
  • Fischer, S.E., 2014, “Systematic Connections between Seneca's Philosophical Works and Tragedies,” in eds. G. Damschen and A. Heil, Brill's Companion to Seneca, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 745–768. (Scholar)
  • Foucault, M., 1986, The Care of the Self (The History of Sexuality: Volume 3), trans. R. Hurley, New York: Pantheon. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1988, Technologies of the Self, ed. L.H. Martin et al., Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, The Hermeneutics of the Subject (Lectures at the Collège de France 1981–1982), G. Burchell (trans.), New York and London: Picador. (Translation of Foucault, L'Hermeneutique du sujet, Cour au Collège de France 1981–1982, ed. F. Gros, Paris.) (Scholar)
  • Gill, Ch., 2003, “The School in the Roman Imperial Period,” in ed. B. Inwood, The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 33–58. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “Seneca and selfhood: integration and disintegration,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 65–83. (Scholar)
  • Graver, M, 2007, Stoicism and Emotion, Chicago, University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Griffin, M., 1992, Seneca: A Philosopher in Politics 2nd edn., Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, “Seneca's Pedagogic Strategy: Letters and De Beneficiis,” Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, 50: 89–113. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, Seneca on Society: A Guide to the De Beneficiis, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hadot, I., 1969, Seneca und die griechisch-römische Tradition der Seelenleitung, Quellen und Studien zur Geschichte der Philosophy Bd. 13, Berlin: de Gruyter. (Scholar)
  • Hadot, P., 1995, Philosophy as a Way of Life: Spiritual Exercises from Socrates to Foucault, ed. Arnold Davidson, trans. Michael Chase, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Harich, H., 1993, “Zur Präsenz des Weiblichen und zur Einschätzung der Frau bei Seneca,” Grazer Studien, 19: 129–155. (Scholar)
  • Inwood, B., 1985, Ethics and human action in early Stoicism, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, Reading Seneca: Stoic Philosophy at Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press: [1] “Seneca in his Philosophical Milieu,” 7–22; [3] “Politics and Paradox in Seneca's De Beneficiis,” 65–94; [4] “Rules and Reasoning in Stoic Ethics,” 95–131; [5] “The Will in Seneca,” 132–156; [6] “God and Human Knowledge in Seneca's Natural Questions,” 157–200; [7] “Moral Judgement in Seneca,” 201–223; [8] “Natural Law in Seneca,” 224–248; [10] “Getting to Goodness,” 271–301; [12] “Seneca and Self-assertion,” 322-352. (Scholar)
  • Irwin, T. H., 1992, “Who discovered the Will?”, in ed. J. Tomberlin, Ethics (Philosophical Perspectives: 6), Atascadero, CA: Ridgeview, 453–473. (Scholar)
  • Kahn, C. H., 1988, “Discovering the Will, in ed. J. M. Dillon and A. A. Long, The Question of ‘Eclecticism’: Studies in Later Greek Philosophy, Berkeley: University of California Press, 234–259. (Scholar)
  • Kamtekar, R., 2005, “Good Feelings and Motivation: Comments on John Cooper 'The Emotional Life of the Wise',” The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 43: 219–229. (Scholar)
  • Ker, J., 2006, “Seneca, Man of Many Genres,” in Volk and Williams (2006) 19–41. (Scholar)
  • Kidd, I., 1978, “Moral Actions and Rules in Stoicism,” in J. Rist (ed.), The Stoics, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 247–258. (Scholar)
  • Leach, E. W., 2008, “The Implied Reader and the Political Argument in Seneca;s Apocolocyntosis and De clementia,” in J. G. Fitch (ed.), Oxford Readings in Classical Studies: Seneca, New York: Oxford University Press, 264–298. (Scholar)
  • Long, A. A., 2003, “Roman philosophy,” in D. Sedley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 184–210. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “Seneca on the self: why now?,” in A. A. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus: Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 360–376. (Scholar)
  • Mann, W.-R., 2006, “Learning How to Die”, in Volk and Williams (2006), 103–122. (Scholar)
  • Manning, C.E., 1981, On Seneca's “Ad Marciam”, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Maurach, G., 2000, Seneca. Leben und Werk, third edition, Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. (Scholar)
  • Mitsis, P., 2001, “The Stoic Origin of Natural Rights,” in K. Ierodiakonou, Topics in Stoic Philosophy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 153–177. (Scholar)
  • Nussbaum, M. C., 1994, The therapy of desire: theory and practice in Hellenistic ethics, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Reydam-Schils, G., 2010, “Seneca's Platonism: The soul and its divine origin,” in eds. A.W. Nightingale and D. Sedley, Ancient Models of the Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 196–215. (Scholar)
  • Rist, J., 1969, Stoic Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Roller, M. 2015, “The Dialogue in Seneca's Dialogues (and Other Moral Essays),” in eds. S. Bartsch and A. Schiesaro, The Cambridge Companion to Seneca, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 54–67. (Scholar)
  • Romm, J.S., 2014, Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero, New York: Alfred A. Knopf. (Scholar)
  • Rosenmeyer, T. G., 1989, Senecan Drama and Cosmology, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Scholar)
  • Russell, D. C., 2004, “Virtue as ‘Likeness to God’ in Plato and Seneca,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 42: 241–260. (Scholar)
  • Schafer, J., 2009, Ars Didactica: Seneca's 94th and 95th Letters, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Seneca's Epistulae Morales as Dramatized Education,” Classical Philology, 106(1): 32–52. (Scholar)
  • Schiesaro, A., 2003, The Passions in Play: Thyestes and the Dynamics of Senecan Drama, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “Seneca and the denial of self,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 221–236. (Scholar)
  • Sedley, D., 2001, “The Stoic-Platonist Debate on kathêkonta,” in K. Ierodiakonou, Topics in Stoic Philosophy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 128–152. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2005, “Stoic Metaphysics at Rome,” in ed. R. Salles, Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 117–142. (Scholar)
  • Setaioli, A., 1988, Seneca e I Greci: Citazioni e Traduzioni nelle Opere Filosofiche, Bologna: Patron. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, “Ethics I: Philosophy as Therapy, Self-Transformation, and 'Lebensform',” in eds. G. Damschen and A. Heil, Brill's Companion to Seneca, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 239–256. (Scholar)
  • Sorabji, R., 1998, “Chrysippus – Posidonius – Seneca: A High-level Debate on Emotion,” in J. Sihvola and T. Engberg-Pedersen (eds.), The Emotions in Hellenistic Philosophy, Dordrecht: Kluwer, 149–169. (Scholar)
  • Star, C., 2012, The Empire of the Self: Self-Command and Political Speech in Seneca and Petronius, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press. (Scholar)
  • Striker, G., 1996, “Origins of the Concept of Natural Law.” Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 2 (1987) 79–94; reprinted in Papers in Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 209–220. (Scholar)
  • Tieleman, T., 2003, Chrysippus' On Affections, Reconstruction and Interpretation, Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Veyne, P., 2003, Seneca: the life of a Stoic, tr. by David Sullivan, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Voelke, A.-J., 1973, L'idée de volonté dans le stoïcisme, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  • Vogt, K. M., 2006, “Anger, present injustice and future revenge in Seneca's De Ira,” in Volk and Williams (2006) 57–74. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, Law, Reason, and the Cosmic City: Political Philosophy in the Early Stoa, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Duties to Others: Demands and Limits,” in M. Betzler (ed.), Kant's Doctrine of Virtue, Berlin: de Gruyter, 219–243. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “A Virtue for Madmen? A Discussion of Susanna Braund, Seneca, De Clementia” Ancient Philosophy 31: 453–459. (Scholar)
  • Volk, K., 2006, “Cosmic Disruption in Seneca's Thyestes: Two Ways of Looking at an Eclipse,” in Volk and Williams (2006), 183–200. (Scholar)
  • Volk, K., and G. Williams (eds.), 2006, Seeing Seneca Whole: Perspectives on Philosophy, Poetry and Politics (Columbia Studies in the Classical Tradition: Volume 28), Leiden: Brill. (Scholar)
  • Wilcox, A. 2006, “Exemplary Grief: Gender and Virtue in Seneca's Consolations to Women,” Helios, 33(1): 73–100. (Scholar)
  • Wildberger, J., 2006, “Seneca and the Stoic Theory of Cognition. Some Preliminary Remarks”, in Volk and Williams (2006) 75–102. (Scholar)
  • Williams, G., 2005, “Interactions: Physics, Morality, and Narrative in Seneca Natural Questions 1,” Classical Philology, 100: 142–165. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “States of Exile, States of Mind: Paradox and Reversal in Seneca's Consolatio ad Heluiam Matrem,” in Volk and Williams (2006) 147–174. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2012, The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's Natural Questions, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wilson, E.R., 2014, The Greatest Empire: A Life of Seneca, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Wray, D., 2009, “Seneca and tragedy's reason,” in eds. S. Bartsch and D. Wray, Seneca and the Self, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 237–254. (Scholar)

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