Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Spinoza’s Psychological Theory" by Michael LeBuffe

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If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records and Google Scholar for your convenience. Some bibliographies are not going to be represented correctly or fully up to date. In general, bibliographies of recent works are going to be much better linked than bibliographies of primary literature and older works. Entries with PhilPapers records have links on their titles. A green link indicates that the item is available online at least partially.

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Primary Sources

Spinoza’s Work

Curley’s translation is used for the passages quoted here. Students of Spinoza in English should be especially attentive to the fact that different translators give widely different translations for Spinoza’s particular affects.

  • Spinoza Opera, Carl Gebhart (ed.), 4 volumes, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1925.
  • The Collected Works of Spinoza, 2 Vols., Edwin Curley (ed. and trans.), Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985, 2016.

Other Primary Literature

  • Aquinas, Saint Thomas, 1964, Summa Theologiae. New York: McGraw-Hill. (Scholar)
  • Cicero, 1933, De Natura Deorum, Cambridge: Loeb Classical Library. (Scholar)
  • Descartes, R., 1985, The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol 1, John Cottingham, Robert Stoothoff and Dugald Murdoch (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [This book includes both the Principles of Philosophy, and The Passions of the Soul.] (Scholar)
  • Hobbes, T., (1839–1845), Thomae Hobbes Malmesburiensis — Opera Philosophica quae Latine scripsit Omnia, Sir William Molesworth (ed.), 5 Volumes. London: John Bohn. (Scholar)
  • Hobbes, T., 1839–1845, The English Works of Thomas Hobbes, Sir William Molesworth (ed.), 11 Volumes. London: John Bohn. (Scholar)
  • Maimonides, M., 1963, The Guide of the Perplexed, Shlomo Pines (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)

Secondary Literature

  • Alanen, L., 2011, “Spinoza on the Human Mind, ” Midwest Studies in Philosophy, 35(1): 4–25. (Scholar)
  • Allison, H., 1987, Benedict de Spinoza: An Introduction, New Haven: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Bennett, J., 1984, A Study of Spinoza’s Ethics, Indianapolis: Hackett. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “Spinoza and Teleology: A Reply to Curley, ” in Spinoza: Issues and Directions, Edwin Curley and Pierre-Francois Moreau (eds.), Leiden: Brill, pp. 53–57. (Scholar)
  • Carlisle, C., 2017, “Spinoza’s Acquiescentia,”Journal of the History of Philosophy 55(2): 209–236. (Scholar)
  • Carriero, J., 2005, “Spinoza on Final Causality,” in Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume 2, Daniel Garber and Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 105–147. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2011, “Conatus and Perfection in Spinoza, ” Midwest Studies in Philosophy, 35(1): 69–92. (Scholar)
  • Curley, E., 1988, Behind the Geometrical Method, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1990, “On Bennett’s Spinoza: The Issue of Teleology,” in Spinoza: Issues and Directions, Edwin Curley and Pierre-Francois Moreau (eds.), Leiden: Brill, 39–52. (Scholar)
  • Delahunty, R., 1985, Spinoza, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. (Scholar)
  • Davidson, D., 1999, “Spinoza’s Causal Theory of the Affects,” in Desire and Affect: Spinoza as Psychologist, Yirmiyaho Yovel (ed.), New York: Little Room Press, pp. 95–111. (Scholar)
  • Della Rocca, M., 1996, “Spinoza’s Metaphysical Psychology,” in The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza, Don Garrett (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 192–266. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “The Power of an Idea: Spinoza’s Critique of Pure Will,” Noûs, 37(2): 200–231. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008a, “Rationalism Run Amok: Representation and the Reality of the Emotions in Spinoza,” in Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays, Charles Huenemann (ed.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 26–52. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008b, Spinoza, New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Garrett, D., 1996, “Spinoza’s Ethical Theory,” in The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza, Don Garrett (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 267–314. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1999, “Teleology in Spinoza and Early Modern Rationalism,” in New Essays on the Rationalists, Rocco Gennaro and Charles Huenemann (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 310–335. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2002, “Spinoza’s Conatus Argument,” in Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes, Olli Koistinen and John Biro (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 127–158. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2008, “Representation and Consciousness in Spinoza’s Naturalistic Theory of the Mind and Imagination,” in Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays, Charles Huenemann (ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 4–25. (Scholar)
  • Hampton, J., 1986, Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Hoffman, P., 1991, “Three Dualist Theories of the Passions,” Philosophical Topics, 19(1): 153–200. (Scholar)
  • James, S., 1993, “Spinoza the Stoic,” in The Rise of Modern Philosophy, Tom Sorell (ed.), Oxford: Clarendon Press, pp. 289–316. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1997, Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Jarrett, C., 1991, “Spinoza’s Denial of Mind-Body Interaction and the Explanation of Human Action,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 29(4): 465–485. (Scholar)
  • Kavka, G., 1986, Hobbesian Moral and Political Theory, Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kisner, M., 2010, “Perfection and Desire: Spinoza on the Good,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 91(1): 97–117. (Scholar)
  • Lachterman, D., 1978, “The Physics of Spinoza’s Ethics,” in Spinoza: New Perspectives, Robert Shahan and J.I. Biro (eds.), Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, pp. 71–111. (Scholar)
  • LeBuffe, M., 2004, “Why Spinoza Tells People to Try to Preserve Their Being,” Archiv fur Geschichte der Philosophie 86: 119–145. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2009, “The Anatomy of the Passions,” in The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza’s Ethics, Olli Koistinen (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 188–222. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010a, From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010b, “Theories about Consciousness in Spinoza’s Ethics,” Philosophical Review, 119(4): 531–563. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2010c, “Spinozistic Perfectionism,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 27(4): 317–333. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015, “The Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms: Miracles, Monotheism, and Reason in Spinoza,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 23(2): 318–332. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2018, Spinoza on Reason, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Lin, M., 2004, “Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Desire: The Demonstration of IIIp6,” Archiv fur Geschichte der Philosophie, 86: 21–55. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2006, “Teleology and Human Action in Spinoza,” Philosophical Review, 115(3): 317–354. (Scholar)
  • Lloyd, G., 1994, Self-Knowledge in Spinoza’s ‘Ethics’, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)
  • Marshall, E., 2008, “Spinoza’s Cognitive Affects and Their Feel, ” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 16(1): 1–23. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Matson, W., 1977, “Death and Destruction in Spinoza’s Ethics,” Inquiry, 20: 403–417. (Scholar)
  • Miller, J., 2007, “The Status of Consciousness in Spinoza’s Concept of Mind,” in Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 203–222. (Scholar)
  • Nadler, S., 2008, “Spinoza and Consciousness,” Mind, 117: 575–601. (Scholar)
  • Peterman, A. 2015, “Spinoza on Extension,” Philosophers’ Imprint, 15(14): 1–23. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “The ‘Physical’ Interlude,” in Spinoza’s Ethics: A Critical Guide, Yitzhak Melamed (ed), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 102–120. (Scholar)
  • Rutherford, D., 1999, “Salvation as a State of Mind: The Place of Acquiescientia in Spinoza’s Ethics,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7(3): 447–473. (Scholar)
  • Schliesser, E., 2017, “Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being,” in The Oxford Handbook of Spinoza, Michael Della Rocca (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 155–189. (Scholar)
  • Schrijvers, M., 1999, “The Conatus and the Mutual Relationship Between Active and Passive Affects in Spinoza,” in Desire and Affect: Spinoza as Psychologist, Yirmiyaho Yovel (ed.), New York: Little Room Press, pp. 63–80. (Scholar)
  • Shapiro, L., 2012, “Spinoza on Imagination and the Affects, ”in Emotional Minds, Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Berlin: De Gruyter, pp. 89–104. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2017, “Spinoza on the Association of the Affects and the Workings of the Human Mind,” in Spinoza’s Ethics: A Critical Guide, Yitzhak Melamed (ed), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 102–120. (Scholar)
  • Voss, S., 1981, “How Spinoza Enumerated the Affects,” Archiv fur Geschichte der Philosophie, 63: 167–179. (Scholar)
  • –––, 1993, “On the Authority of the Passiones Animae,” Archiv fur Geschichte der Philosophie, 75: 160–178. (Scholar)
  • Wolfson, H.A., 1934, The Philosophy of Spinoza, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Scholar)
  • Youpa, A., 1999, “Transcending Mere Survival,” in Desire and Affect: Spinoza as Psychologist, Yirmiyaho Yovel (ed.), New York: Little Room Press, pp. 45–61. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Spinozistic Self-Preservation,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 41(3): 477–490. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, “Spinoza’s Theory of Motivation,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 88(3): 375–390. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, The Ethics of Joy, New York: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)

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