Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Mary Wollstonecraft" by Sylvana Tomaselli

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Primary Sources

Listed below are the earliest editions of Wollstonecraft’s works, followed by the dates of other editions published in her lifetime, and some later editions of each of the texts. All appear in The Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, Janet Todd and Marilyn Butler, eds., London, Pickering and Chatto, 1989, 7 vols (thereafter cited as Works)

  • Thoughts on the Education of Daughters: With Reflections on Female Conduct, in the More Important Duties of Life. London: Joseph Johnson, 1787.
  • Mary, A Fiction, London: Joseph Johnson, 1788.
    • With an introduction by Gina Luria, New York: Garland, 1974. (Scholar)
  • Original Stories from Real Life: with Conversations Calculated to Regulate the Affections and Form the Mind to Truth and Goodness, London: Joseph Johnson, 1788; 1791; 1796. With illustrations by William Blake.
  • The Female Reader: or Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse: Selected from the Best Writers, and Disposed under Proper Heads: for the Improvement of Young Women, by Mr Creswick, London: Joseph Johnson, 1789.
    • Edited by Moira Ferguson, Delmar, N.Y.: Scholar’s Facsimiles, 1979. (Scholar)
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Men, in a Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, London: Joseph Johnson, November, 1790 anonymous; December, 1790 bearing Wollstonecraft’s authorship.
    • Edited by Eleanor Louise Nicholes, Gainesville, Florida: Scholar’s Facsimiles & Reprints, 1960. (Scholar)
    • Edited by Janet Todd, in Political Writings: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and An historical and Moral View of the French Revolution, London: Pickering; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993, 1994.
    • Edited by Sylvana Tomaselli, in A Vindication of the Rights of Men with A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Hints, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects, London: Joseph Johnson, 1792; second edition 1792; reprinted 1796. Second imprint dedicated to M. Talleyrand-Périgord.
    • Edited by Miriam Brody Kramnick, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972.
    • Edited by Carol H. Poston with reprints of interpretative articles, New York: Norton, 1988.
    • Edited by Barbara Taylor. London: Everyman, 1992.
    • Edited by Janet Todd, in Political Writings: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, An historical and Moral View of the French Revolution, London: Pickering; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993, 1994.
    • Edited by Sylvana Tomaselli, in A Vindication of the Rights of Men with A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Hints, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
  • An Historical and Moral View of the Origin and Progress of the French Revolution; and the Effect it has produced in Europe, London: Joseph Johnson, 1794.
    • Edited by Janet Todd, in Political Writings: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A vindication of the Rights of Woman, An historical and Moral View of the French Revolution, London: Pickering; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993, 1994. (Scholar)
  • Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, London: Joseph Johnson, 1796.
    • Edited by Carol H. Poston, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1976. (Scholar)
    • Edited by Richard Holmes, in Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, A Short Residence in Sweden, Norway and Denmark and Memoirs of the Author of “The Rights of Woman”, London: Penguin, 1987. (Scholar)

Translations by Mary Wollstonecraft

All three works are included in Works.

  • Of the Importance of Religious Opinions. Translated from the French of Mr. (Jacques) Necker. London: Joseph Johnson, 1788; Dublin, 1788; Philadelphia, 1791. (Scholar)
  • Elements of Morality for the use of children; with an Introductory Address to Parents. Translated from the German of the Rev. C(hristian) G(otthilf) Salzmann. 2 vols., London: Joseph Johnson, 1790; 3 vols., 1792 with illustrations; first edition reprinted, 1793.
  • Young Grandison. A Series of Letters from Young Persons to their friends>. Translated from the Dutch of Madame (Maria Geertruida van de Werken) de Cambon. With Alterations and Improvements. 2 vols. London: Joseph Johnson, 1790; Dublin, 1790. (Scholar)

Other works

All included in Works.

  • Reviews in Analytical Review, 1788–1792, 1796–1797.
  • “On Poetry and Our Relish for the Beauties of Nature”, Monthly Magazine, April, 1797, pp. 279–82. (Scholar)
  • Posthumous Works of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman, William Godwin ed., London: Joseph Johnson, 1798.

Posthumous publications

All incomplete and in Works

  • The Wrongs of Woman, or Maria. A Fragment. Begun in 1796.
  • Extract from the Cave of Fancy. A Tale. Written in 1787.
  • Letter on the Present Character of the French Nation. Dated 1793.
  • Fragment of Letters on the Management of Infants.
  • Lessons.
  • Hints.
    • Edited by Sylvana Tomaselli in <A Vindication of the Rights of Men with A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Hints>. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Other Primary Works of Relevance

  • The Emigrants, &c., or: The History of an Expatriated Family, Being a Delineation of English Manners, Drawn from Real Character, written in America, by G. Imlay, esq., Dublin: C. Brown, 1794.
    • Edited by Robert R. Hare as Traditionally ascribed to Gilbert Imlay but, more probably, by MW. Gainesville, Florida: Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints, 1964. (Scholar)

Other Collections of Wollstonecraft’s works

  • The Memoirs and Posthumous Works of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, William Godwin ed., London: Joseph Johnson, 1798.
    • Gina Luria, ed., (1974) New York: Garlan Press. (Scholar)
  • A Wollstonecraft Anthology, Janet Todd (ed.), Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1977, 1989.

Letters

A selection:

  • Todd, Janet and Marilyn Butler, eds., Works, cited above.
  • Wardle, Ralph, M, ed. 1979, Collected Letters of Mary Wollstonecraft, . Ithaca: Cornell University Press. (Scholar)

Bibliographies

Studies

The following is a selection. Note also, the introductions to the various editions of Wollstonecraft’s works listed above.

  • Abbey, Ruth, 1999, “Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft”, Hypatia, 14(3): 78–95. (Scholar)
  • Bahar, Saba, 2002, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Social and Aesthetic Philosophy: ‘An Eve to Please me’, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave. (Scholar)
  • Bergès, Sandrine, 2013, The Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, London and New York: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Bergès, Sandrine, Botting, Eileen Hunt, and Coffee, Alan (eds.), 2019, The Wollstonecraftian Mind, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Bergès, Sandrine, and Coffee, Alan, 2016, The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Botting, Eileen Hunt, 2006, Family Feuds: Wollstonecraft, Burke, and Rousseau on the Transformation of the Family, New York: State University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2013, “Wollstonecraft in Europe, 1792–1904: A Revisionist Reception History”, History of European Ideas, 39(4): 503–527. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, Wollstonecraft, Mill & Women’s Human Rights, New Haven and London: Yale University Press. (Scholar)
  • Botting, Eileen Hunt, and Carey, Christine (eds.), 2004, “Wollstonecraft’s Philosophical Impact on Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Rights Advocates”, American Journal of Political Science, 48(4): 707–722. (Scholar)
  • Bour, Isabelle, 2019, “Epistemology,” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting, and Alan Coffee (eds.), pp. 311–322, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Brace, Laura, 2000, “‘Not Empire, but Equality’: Mary Wollstonecraft, the Marriage State and the Sexual Contract,”, Journal of Political Philosophy, 8(4): 433–455. (Scholar)
  • Brooke, Christopher, 2019, “Jean-Jacques Rousseau,” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting, and Alan Coffee (eds.), pp. 161–170, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Clemit, Pamela, 2002, “The Different Faces of Mary Wollstonecraft”, Enlightenment and Dissent, 21:163–169. (Scholar)
  • Coffee, Alan, 2013, “Mary Wollstonecraft, Freedom and the Enduring Power of Social Domination”, European Journal of Political Theory, 12(2): 116–135. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2014, “Freedom as Independence: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Grand Blessing of Life”, Hypathia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 29(4): 116–924. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, “Catherine Macaulay,” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind, Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting, and Alan Coffee (eds.), pp. 198–210, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Conniff, James, 1999, “Edmund Burke and His Critics: The case of Mary Wollstonecraft”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 60(2): 299–318. (Scholar)
  • Crafton, Lisa Plummer, 2000, “‘Insipid Decency’: Modesty and Female Sexuality in Wollstonecraft,” European Romantic Review 11(3): 277–299. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2016, Transgressive Theatricality, Romanticism, and Mary Wollstonecraft, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Dumler-Winckler, Emily, 2019, “Theology and Religion,” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting, and Alan Coffee (eds.), pp. 297–310, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Fairclough, Mary, 2020, “Edmund Burke” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting and Alan Coffee (eds.), pp. 183–97, Routledge, London. (Scholar)
  • Falco, Maria J. (ed.), 1996, Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press. (Scholar)
  • Fallon, David, “Mary Wollstonecraft in Context”, Nancy E. Johnson and Paul Keen (eds.), pp. 29–37, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Ferguson, Moira, 1994, Colonialism and Gender Relations from Mary Wollstonecraft to Jamaica Kincaid: East Caribbean Connections, New York: Columbia University Press. (Scholar)
  • Gordon, Lyndall, 2005, Mary Wollstonecraft: A new genus, New York: HarperCollins. (Scholar)
  • Guest, Harriet, 2000, Women, Learning, Patriotism, 1750–1810, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Gunther-Canada, Wendy, 1998, “The politics of sense and sensibility: Mary Wollstonecraft and Catharine Macaulay Graham on Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France”, Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition, Hilds L. Smith (ed), pp. 126–147, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, Rebel Writer: Mary Wollstonecraft and Enlightenment Politics DeKlab, Illinois: Northern Illinois University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, “Cultivating Virtue: Catharine Macaulay and Mary Wollstonecraft on Civic Education,”, Women and Politics, 25(3): 47–70. (Scholar)
  • Halldenius, Lena, 2007, “The Primacy of Right. On the Triad of Liberty, Equality and Virtue in Wollstonecraft’s Political Thought”, British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 15(1): 75–99. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2015, Mary Wollstonecraft and Feminist Republicanism: Independence, Rights and the Experience of Unfreedom, London: Pickering & Chatto. (Scholar)
  • Johns, Alessa, 2020, “Translations” in Mary Wollstonecraft in Context, Nancy E. Johnson and Paul Keen (eds.), pp. 323–331, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Johnson, Claudia (ed.), 2002, The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Johnson, Nancy E. and Keen, Paul (eds.), 2020, Mary Wollstonecraft in Context, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Jones, Vivien, 2005, “Advice and Enlightenment: Mary Wollstonecraft and Sex Education,” in Women, Gender and Enlightenment, Sarah Knott and Barbara Taylor (eds.), pp. 140–155, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, “Conduct Literature”, in Mary Wollstonecraft in Context, Nancy E. Johnson and Paul Keen (eds.), pp. 238–245, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Kelly, Gary, 1992, Revolutionary Feminism: The Mind and Career of Mary Wollstonecraft, London: MacMillan. (Scholar)
  • Kendrick, Nancy, 2019, “Marriage, Love, and Friendship” in The Wollstonecraftian Mind, Sandrine Bergès, Eileen Hunt Botting and Alan Coffee eds., pp. 381–390, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • Kitts, S., 1994, “Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: A Judicious Response from Eighteenth-Century Spain,”, Modern Language Review, 89(2): 351–59. (Scholar)
  • Knott, Sarah, and Barbara Taylor eds., 2005, Women, Gender and Enlightenment, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave. (Scholar)
  • Landes, Joan B., 1988, Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press (Scholar)
  • Leddy, Neven, 2016, “Mary Wollstonecraft and Adam Smith on Gender, History, and the Civic Republican Tradition,” in On Civic Republicanism: Ancient Lessons for Global Politics, edited by Neven Leddy and Geoffrey C. Kellow, pp. 269–281, Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press. (Scholar)
  • Mackenzie, Catriona, 2016, “Mary Wollstonecraft: An Early Relational Autonomy Theorist?,” in The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft, Sandrine Bergès and Alan M. S. J. Coffee eds., pp. 67–91, Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Scholar)
  • Modugno, Roberta A., 2002, Mary Wollstonecraft: Diritti unami e Rivoluzione francese, Rome: Rubbettino Editore Srl. (Scholar)
  • Offen, Karen, 1999, European Feminisms, 1700–1950: A Political History, Stanford: Stanford University Press. (Scholar)
  • O’Neill, Daniel I., 2007, The Burke-Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy, University Park, PA: Pennsylvania University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2007, John Adams versus Mary Wollstonecraft on the French Revolution and Democracy Journal of the History of Ideas , 68(3): 451 –476. (Scholar)
  • O’Brien, Karen, 2009, Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Sapiro, Virginia, 1992, A Vindication of Political Virtue: The Political Theory of Mary Wollstonecraft, Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press. (Scholar)
  • Schulman, Alex, 2007, “Gothic Piles and Endless Forests: Wollstonecraft between Burke and Rousseau,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 41(1): 41–54. (Scholar)
  • Seeber, Barbara K., 2016, “Mary Wollstonecraft: ‘Systemiz[ing] Oppression’—Feminism, Nature, and Animals,” in Peter Cannavò, Joseph Lane, and John Barry (eds.), Engaging Nature: Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon, pp. 173–188, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Scholar)
  • Taylor, Barbara, 1983, Eve and The New Jerusalem: Socialism and Feminism in the Nineteenth Century, London: Virago Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2003, Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • Todd, Janet, 2000, Mary Wollstonecraft: a revolutionary life, London: Weidenfel and Nicholson. (Scholar)
  • Tomalin, Claire, 1992, The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, revised edition, London: Penguin Books. (Scholar)
  • Tomaselli, Sylvana, 1997, “The Death and Rebirth of Character in the Eighteenth Century” in Roy Porter (ed.), Rewriting the Self, pp. 84–96, London: Routledge. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2001, “The Most Public Sphere of all; the family”, in E. Eger, C. Grant, C. Gallchoir, and P. Warburton (eds.), Women, Writing and the Public Sphere 1700–1830, pp. 239–256, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2019, “‘Have ye not heard that we cannot serve two masters?’ The Platonism of Mary Wollstonecraft”, in Revisioning Cambridge Platonism: Sources and Legacy, Douglas Hedley and David Leech (eds.), pp. 175–189, New York: Springer. (Scholar)
  • –––, 2020, Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy, Passion, and Politics, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press. (Scholar)
  • Verhoeven, Wil, 2008, Gilbert Imlay: Citizen of the world, London: Pickering and Chatto. (Scholar)

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