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1 — 50 / 293
  1. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
  2. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  3. Rolf Edberg (1974). At the Foot of the Tree. University, Ala., University of Alabama Press.
  4. der Steen & J. Wim (2000). Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis. Praeger.
  5. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  6. Catherine Roberts (1980). Science, Animals, and Evolution: Reflections on Some Unrealized Potentials of Biology and Medicine. Greenwood Press.
  7. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1993). Method in Ecology: Strategies for Conservation. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, the authors discuss what practical contributions ecology can and can't make in applied science and environmental problem solving. In the first section, they discuss conceptual problems that have often prevented the formulation and evaluation of powerful, precise, general theories, explain why island biogeography is still beset with controversy and examine the ways that science is value laden. In the second section, they describe how ecology can give us specific answers to practical environmental questions posed in individual case (...)
  8. Markku Oksanen & Juhani Pietarinen (eds.) (2004). Philosophy and Biodiversity. Cambridge University Press.
    This important collection focuses on the nature and importance of biodiversity. The concept is clarified and its intrinsic and instrumental value are discussed. Even though the term biodiversity was invented in the 1980s to promote the cause of species conservation, discussions on biological diversity go back to Plato. There are many controversies surrounding biodiversity and a few of them are examined here: What is worthy of protection or restoration and what is the acceptable level of costs? Is it permissible to (...)
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  9. Philip W. Sutton (2004). Nature, Environment, and Society. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    How have sociologists responded to the emergence of environmentalism? What has sociology to offer the study of environmental problems? This uniquely comprehensive guide traces the origins and development of environmental movements and environmental issues, providing a critical review of the most significant debates in the new field of environmental sociology. It covers environmental ideas, environmental movements, social constructionism, critical realism, "ecocentric" theory, environmental identities, risk society theory, sustainable development, Green consumerism, ecological modernization and debates around modernity and post- modernity. Philip (...)
  10. Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.) (1991). Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  11. Richard Levins (1985). The Dialectical Biologist. Harvard University Press.
    Throughout, this book questions our accepted definitions and biases, showing the self-reflective nature of scientific activity within society.
  12. Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.) (1993). Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge.
    The book creates a framework for a cohesive discourse, for a "new human ecology".
  13. Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies or geography.
  14. Bryan G. Norton (2002). Searching for Sustainability: Interdisciplinary Essays in the Philosophy of Conservation Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines from a multidisciplinary viewpoint the question of what we mean - what we should mean - by setting sustainability as a goal for environmental management. The author, trained as a philosopher of science and language, explores ways to break down the disciplinary barriers to communication and deliberation about environment policy, and to integrate science and evaluations into a more comprehensive environmental policy. Choosing sustainability as the keystone concept of environmental policy, the author explores what we can learn (...)
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  15. Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart.
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  16. Christopher Hookway (ed.) (1984). Minds, Machines And Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of original essays written by philosophers and scientists and dealing with philosophical questions arising from work in evolutionary biology and artificial intelligence. In recent years both of these areas have been the focus for attempts to provide a scientific, model of a wide range of human capacities - most prominently perhaps in sociobiology and cognitive psychology. The book therefore examines a number of issues related to the search for a 'naturalistic' or scientific account of human experience (...)
  17. Timothy Clack (2009). Ancestral Roots: Modern Living and Human Evolution. Macmillan.
    Human evolution explains how we have found ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Issues of modern living; depression, obesity, and environmental destruction, can be understood in relation to our evolutionary past. This book shows how an awareness of this past and its relation to the present can help limit their impact on the future.
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  18. Sean Esbjörn-Hargens (2009). Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World. Integral Books.
    In response to this pressing need, Integral Ecology unites valuable insights from multiple perspectives into a comprehensive theoretical framework-one that can ...
  19. Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the interpretation of (...)
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  20. Fred Wilson (1991). Empiricism and Darwin's Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  21. Michael Ruse (1988). Philosophy of Biology Today. State University of New York Press.
    This short and highly accessible volume opens up the subject of the philosophy of biology to professionals and to students in both disciplines. The text covers briefly and clearly all of the pertinent topics in the subject, dealing with both human and non-human issues, and quite uniquely surveying not only scholars in the English-speaking world but others elsewhere, including the Eastern block. As molecular biologists peer ever more deeply into life’s mysteries, there are those who fear that such ‘reductionism’ conceals (...)
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  22. Paul H. Barrett (ed.) (1987). A Concordance to Darwin's the Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex. Cornell University Press.
  23. Thomas F. Glick (ed.) (1988). The Comparative Reception of Darwinism. University of Chicago Press.
    The reaction to Darwin's Origin of Species varied in many countries according to the roles played by national scientific institutions and traditions and the attitudes of religious and political groups. The contributors to this volume, including M. J. S. Hodge, David Hull, and Roberto Moreno, gathered in 1972 at an international conference on the comparative reception of Darwinism. Their essays look at early pro- and anti-Darwinism arguments, and three additional comparative essays and appendices add a larger perspective. For this paperback (...)
  24. Lindley Darden (1991). Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics. Oxford University Press.
    This innovative book focuses on the development of the gene theory as a case study in scientific creativity.
  25. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  26. David Cayley (1991). The Age of Ecology: The Environment on Cbc Radio's Ideas. J. Lorimer.
    Based on interviews conducted for CBC Radio's Ideas, this book draws together an international selection of environmental experts, scientists, philosophers, and ...
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  27. John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter (1990). Science and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
    This book espouses an innovative theory of scientific realism in which due weight is given to mathematics and logic. The authors argue that mathematics can be understood realistically if it is seen to be the study of universals, of properties and relations, of patterns and structures, the kinds of things which can be in several places at once. Taking this kind of scientific platonism as their point of departure, they show how the theory of universals can account for probability, laws (...)
  28. Tama Leaver (2011). Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies. Routledge.
  29. Keekok Lee (2003). Philosophy and Revolutions in Genetics: Deep Science and Deep Technology. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The last century saw two great revolutions in genetics the development of classic Mendelian theory and the discovery and investigation of DNA. Each fundamental scientific discovery in turn generated its own distinctive technology. These two case studies, examined in this text, enable the author to conduct a philosophical exploration of the relationship between fundamental scientific discoveries on the one hand, and the technologies that spring from them on the other. As such it is also an exercise in the philosophy of (...)
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  30. Suzanne Cunningham (1996). Philosophy and the Darwinian Legacy. University of Rochester Press.
  31. Gregory J. Cooper (2003). The Science of the Struggle for Existence: On the Foundations of Ecology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a sustained examination of issues in the philosophy of ecology that have been a source of controversy since the emergence of ecology as an explicit scientific discipline. The controversies revolve around the idea of a balance of nature, the possibility of general ecological knowledge and the role of model-building in ecology. The Science of the Struggle for Existence is also a detailed treatment of these issues that incorporates both a comprehensive investigation of the relevant ecological literature and (...)
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  32. Roger J. Faber (1986). Clockwork Garden: On the Mechanistic Reduction of Living Things. University of Massachusetts Press.
    ONE Wholes and Parts: Introductory Survey COMMON WISDOM ABOUT THE WORLD GUIDES us WELL in daily living, but getting along practically is not enough; ...
  33. Paul F. Boller (1969). American Thought in Transition: The Impact of Evolutionary Naturalism, 1865-1900. Chicago: Rand Mcnally.
  34. Michael Getzner, Clive L. Spash & Sigrid Stagl (eds.) (2005). Alternatives for Environmental Valuation. Routledge.
    How can we value the environment, this is the crucial issue that this book debates. The critical analyses carried out within the book by such figures as Nick Hanley and Jonathan Aldred are vital to ensuring that future economic growth is not achieved at the expense of our environment.
  35. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This book looks anew at the question of nature preservation as public policy. The philosophy of nature preservation has to date focused on whether arguments for nature preservation should be centred on the value of nature itself or derived human benefits . This book argues that this way of thinking about the problem of preservation has been counter-productive for environmental ethics. Instead we need to unite both views around a concern for the irreplaceability of natural objects.
  36. Donald J. Weinshank & Charles Darwin (eds.) (1990). A Concordance to Charles Darwin's Notebooks, 1836-1844. Cornell University Press.
  37. William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, William Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules (...)
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  38. Bentley Glass (1968). Forerunners of Darwin, 1745-1859. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  39. H. Carel & D. Gamez (eds.) (2004). What Philosophy Is. Ccontinuum.
    This book addresses the question "What is Philosophy?" by gathering together responses from philosophers working in a variety of areas.
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  40. Elliott Sober (2000). Philosophy of Biology. Westview Press.
    Perhaps because of it implications for our understanding of human nature, recent philosophy of biology has seen what might be the most dramatic work in the philosophies of the ”special” sciences. This drama has centered on evolutionary theory, and in the second edition of this textbook, Elliott Sober introduces the reader to the most important issues of these developments. With a rare combination of technical sophistication and clarity of expression, Sober engages both the higher level of theory and the direct (...)
  41. A. Boden Margaret (ed.) (1996). The Philosophy of Artificial Life. Oxford University Press.
    This new volume in the acclaimed Oxford Readings in Philosophy sereis offers a selection of the most important philosophical work being done in the new and fast-growing interdisciplinary area of artificial life. Artificial life research seeks to synthesize the characteristics of life by artificial means, particularly employing computer technology. The essays here explore such fascinating themes as the nature of life, the relation between life and mind, and the limits of technology.
  42. Brian Baxter (2000). Ecologism: An Introduction. Georgetown University Press.
  43. Alan Fogel, Maria C. D. P. Lyra & Jaan Valsiner (eds.) (1997). Dynamics and Indeterminism in Developmental and Social Processes. L. Erlbaum.
    One of the most profound insights of the dynamic systems perspective is that new structures resulting from the developmental process do not need to be planned in advance, nor is it necessary to have these structures represented in genetic or neurological templates prior to their emergence. Rather, new structures can emerge as components of the individual and the environment self-organize; that is, as they mutually constrain each other's actions, new patterns and structures may arise. This theoretical possibility brings into developmental (...)
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  44. Peter J. Beurton, Raphael Falk & Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (eds.) (2000). The Concept of the Gene in Development and Evolution: Historical and Epistemological Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
    Advances in molecular biological research in the latter half of the twentieth century have made the story of the gene vastly complicated: the more we learn about genes, the less sure we are of what a gene really is. Knowledge about the structure and functioning of genes abounds, but the gene has also become curiously intangible. This collection of essays renews the question: what are genes? Philosophers, historians and working scientists re-evaluate the question in this volume, treating the gene as (...)
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  45. Edward O. Wilson (1998). Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. Random House.
    An enormous intellectual adventure. In this groundbreaking new book, the American biologist Edward O. Wilson, considered to be one of the world's greatest living scientists, argues for the fundamental unity of all knowledge and the need to search for consilience --the proof that everything in our world is organized in terms of a small number of fundamental natural laws that comprise the principles underlying every branch of learning. Professor Wilson, the pioneer of sociobiology and biodiversity, now once again breaks out (...)
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  46. Charles Darwin (2007). The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Plume.
    The most accessible edition ever published of Darwin’s incendiary classic, edited by “as fine a science essayist as we have” ( New York Times ) The Descent of Man , Darwin’s second landmark work on evolutionary theory (following The Origin of the Species ), marked a turning point in the history of science with its modern vision of human nature as the product of evolution. Darwin argued that the noblest features of humans, such as language and morality, were the result (...)
  47. Charles Darwin (1874). The Descent of Man. Prometheus Books.
    Divided into three parts, this book's purpose, as given in the introduction, is to consider whether or not man is descended from a pre-existing form, his manner ...
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  48. Peter Achinstein (1983). The Nature of Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new approach to scientific explanation, this book focuses initially on the explaining act itself.
  49. James Maclaurin & Kim Sterelny (2008). What is Biodiversity? University of Chicago Press.
    What Is Biodiversity? is a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but many. Maclaurin and Sterelny (...)
  50. Freya Mathews (ed.) (1995). Ecology and Democracy. Frank Cass.
    What is the optimal political framework for environmental reform reform on a scale commensurate with the global ecological crisis? In particular, how adequate are liberal forms of parliamentary democracy to the challenge posed by this crisis? These are the questions pondered by the contributors to this volume. Exploration of the possibilities of democracy gives rise to certain common themes. These are the relation between ecological morality and political structures or procedures and the question of the structure of decision-making and distribution (...)
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  51. 1 — 50 / 293