Year:

  1.  63
    Parallels Between Tyrant and Philosopher in Plato’s Republic.Sophia Connell - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (2):447-477.
    Plato's Republic presents the characters of the philosopher and the tyrant as similar. Strongly focused by indiscriminate erotic motivation, both defy convention and lack familiar emotional responses, which make them appear to be mad. This essay argues that Plato put forward these parallels partly in order to defend Socrates from the charge of corrupting the young, partly to present a possible way to overthrow the current regime and partly to show the ineffectiveness of democracy. The very best leaders may look (...)
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  2.  81
    Diogenes the Cynic on Law and World Citizenship.Christopher Paone - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (2):478 – 498.
    Against the traditional reading of Cynic cosmopolitanism, this essay advances the thesis that Diogenes’ world citizenship is a positive claim supported by philosophical argument and philosophical example. Evidence in favor of this thesis is a new interpretation of Diogenes’ syllogistic argument concerning law (nomos) (D.L. 6.72). Important to the argument are an understanding of Diogenes’ philanthropic character and his moral imperative to ‘re-stamp the currency’. Whereas Socrates understands his care as attached specially to Athens, Diogenes’ philosophical mission and form of (...)
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  3. The Law in Plato’s Laws: A Reading of the ‘Classical Thesis’.Luke William Hunt - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (1):102-126.
    Plato’s Laws include what H.L.A. Hart called the ‘classical thesis’ about the nature and role of law: the law exists to see that one leads a morally good life. This paper develops Hart’s brief remarks by providing a panorama of the classical thesis in Laws. This is done by considering two themes: (1) the extent to which Laws is paternalistic, and (2) the extent to which Laws is naturalistic. These themes are significant for a number of reasons, including because they (...)
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  4.  31
    Philosophical Genesis: The Three Waves and the City-Soul Analogy in Republic V.Charlotte C. S. Thomas & Kevin S. Honeycutt - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (1):164-185.
  5. ‘Review of C. Arruzza and D. Nikulin (Eds.) (2016) Philosophy and Political Power in Antiquity (Brill)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35:312-315.
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