Authors
Craig Warmke
Northern Illinois University
Abstract
Many want to know what bitcoin is and how it works. But bitcoin is as complex as it is controversial, and relatively few have the technical background to understand it. In this paper, I offer an accessible on-ramp for understanding bitcoin in the form of a model. My model reveals both what bitcoin is and how it works. More specifically, it reveals that bitcoin is a fictional substance in a massively coauthored story on a network that automates and distributes jobs normally entrusted to centralized publishing institutions. My model therefore falsifies a popular view according to which each bitcoin is a chunk of code.
Keywords bitcoin  metaphysics  fiction  modeling  blockchain  cryptocurrency
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 70,039
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

On the Plurality of Worlds.David Lewis - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 178 (3):388-390.
Naming and Necessity.S. Kripke - 1972 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 45 (4):665-666.
Naming and Necessity.Saul A. Kripke - 1985 - Critica 17 (49):69-71.
Nonexistent Objects.Terence Parsons - 1980 - Yale University Press.

View all 23 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Self-Enforcing Online Dispute Resolution: Lessons From Bitcoin.Pietro Ortolani - 2016 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (3):595-629.
The Ethics of Payments: Paper, Plastic, or Bitcoin?James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):603-611.
Cryptocurrencies as Narrative Technologies.Mark Coeckelbergh & Wessel Reijers - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):172-178.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2020-11-19

Total views
962 ( #6,653 of 2,506,010 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
271 ( #1,801 of 2,506,010 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes