Craig Paterson BioEthicWorld
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  • Research staff, BioEthicWorld
  • PhD, Saint Louis University, 2001.

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  1. C. A. Lengacher, H. Jim, R. Reich, E. Pracht, B. Craig, S. Ramesar, I. Carranza, C. Paterson, P. Budhrani & L. Millette (2012). Improving Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Cost-Effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction. Irb 1:01A2.
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  2. Craig Paterson (2010). Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why we (...)
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  3. Craig Paterson (2009). A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia. In Rajitha Tadikonda (ed.), Physician Assisted Euthanasia. Icfai University Press.
    In the chapter “A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia” author Craig Paterson explores questions concerning the legitimacy of the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The aim of this article is of identifying some of the main historical protagonists, and delineating some of the key arguments that have been used for the acceptance or rejection of these practices.
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  4. Craig Paterson (2006). Aquinas, Finnis and Non-Naturalism. In Craig Paterson & Matthew Pugh (eds.), Analytical Thomism: Traditions in Dialogue. Ashgate.
    In this chapter I seek to examine the credibility of Finnis’s basic stance on Aquinas that while many neo-Thomists are meta-ethically naturalistic in their understanding of natural law theory (for example, Heinrich Rommen, Henry Veatch, Ralph McInerny, Russell Hittinger, Benedict Ashley and Anthony Lisska), Aquinas’s own meta-ethical framework avoids the “pitfall” of naturalism. On examination, the short of it is that I find Finnis’s account (while adroit) wanting in the interpretation stakes vis-à-vis other accounts of Aquinas’s meta-ethical foundationalism. I think (...)
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  5. Craig Paterson & Matthew Pugh (eds.) (2006). Analytical Thomism: Traditions in Dialogue. Ashgate.
    All those interested in the thought of St Thomas Aquinas, and more generally contemporary Catholic scholarship, problems in philosophy of religion, and ...
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  6. Craig Paterson & Matthew Pugh (2006). Introduction to Analytical Thomism. In Craig Paterson & Matthew Pugh (eds.), Analytical Thomism: Traditions in Dialogue. Ashgate.
    This overview proceeds by outlining, albeit very briefly, something of the historical growth of Thomism, turning then to a brief account of how analytic philosophy in the twentieth century can be viewed in relation to that history, before finally turning to a further consideration of what the phrase “Analytical Thomism,” can be taken to mean in light of this brief historical account.
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  7. Craig Paterson (2003). A Life Not Worth Living? Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (2):1-20.
    The work of Dan Brock and Helga Kuhse is typical of the current stream of thought rejecting the validity of sanctity of life appeals to instill objective inviolable worth in human life regardless of the quality of life of the patient. The context of a person's life is supremely important. In their systems life can have high value, yet the value of life can be outweighed by the force of other disvalues. The notion of quality of life has increasingly come (...)
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  8. Craig Paterson (2003). On Clarifying Terms in Applied Ethics Discourse: Suicide, Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):351-358.
    All too often in applied ethics debates, there is a danger that a lack of analytical clarity and precision in the use of key terms serves to cloud and confuse the real nature of the debate being undertaken. A particular area of concern in my analysis of the bioethics literature has been the uses to which the key terms "suicide," "assisted suicide," and "euthanasia" are put. The modest aim of this article is to render a contribution to the applied ethics (...)
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  9. Craig Paterson (2003). On Clarifying Terms in Applied Ethics Discourse. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):351-358.
    All too often in applied ethics debates, there is a danger that a lack of analytical clarity and precision in the use of key terms serves to cloud and confuse the real nature of the debate being undertaken. A particular area of concern in my analysis of the bioethics literature has been the uses to which the key terms “suicide,” “assisted suicide,” and “euthanasia” are put. The modest aim of this article is to render a contribution to the applied ethics (...)
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  10. Craig Paterson (2001). The Contribution of Natural Law Theory to Moral and Legal Debate Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Universal Publishers.
    Chapter one argues for the important contribution that a natural law based framework can make towards an analysis and assessment of key controversies surrounding the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The second chapter considers a number of historical contributions to the debate. The third chapter takes up the modern context of ideas that have increasingly come to the fore in shaping the 'push' for reform. Particular areas focused upon include the value of human life, the value of (...)
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  11. Craig Paterson (2000). On "Killing" Versus "Letting Die" in Clinical Practice: Mere Sophistry With Words? Journal of Nursing Law 6 (4):25-44.
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  12. Craig Paterson (2000). Renewing the Moral Life: Some Recent Work in Virtue Theory. New Blackfriars 81 (952):238-44.
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  13. Craig Paterson, A History of Ideas Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.
    The article examines from an historical perspective some of the key ideas used in contemporary bioethics debates both for and against the practices of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Key thinkers examined--spanning the Ancient, Medieval and Modern periods--include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, and Mill. The article concludes with a synthesizing summary of key ideas that oppose or defend assisted suicide and euthanasia.
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  14. Craig Paterson, Health Care, Social Justice and the Common Good.
    This paper is essentially concerned with defending the idea of a universal right to adequate health care coverage. It will argue for the existence of a human right grounded in Catholic social thought. At the outset, a statement of clarification is needed. This paper does not pretend to offer the panacea for all ills relating to health care provision. Rather, it is an inquiry into the kinds of value that should inform decision making relating to health policy. A universal right (...)
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