Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):222-222 (2012)

Abstract
Human tool behavior is species-specific. It remains a diagnostic feature of humans, even when comparisons are made with closely related non-human primates. The archaeological record demonstrates both the deep antiquity of human tool behavior and its fundamental role in distinguishing human behavior from that of non-human primates
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x11001981
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