History of European Ideas 38 (4):493-507 (2012)

Abstract
Summary Historians of all kinds are beginning to return to temporally expansive studies after decades of aversion and neglect. There are even signs that intellectual historians are returning to the longue durée. What are the reasons for this revival of long-range intellectual history? And how might it be rendered methodologically robust as well as historically compelling? This article proposes a model of transtemporal history, proceeding via serial contextualism to create a history in ideas spanning centuries, even millennia: key examples come from work in progress on ideas of civil war from ancient Rome to the present. The article concludes with brief reflections on the potential impact of the digital humanities on the practice of long-range intellectual history. Summary Historians of all kinds are beginning to return to temporally expansive studies after decades of aversion and neglect. There are even signs that intellectual historians are returning to the longue durée. What are the reasons for this revival of long-range intellectual history? And how might it be rendered methodologically robust as well as historically compelling? This article proposes a model of transtemporal history, proceeding via serial contextualism to create a history in ideas spanning centuries, even millennia: key examples come from work in progress on ideas of civil war from ancient Rome to the present. The article concludes with brief reflections on the potential impact of the digital humanities on the practice of long-range intellectual history
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DOI 10.1080/01916599.2012.714635
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References found in this work BETA

Essentially Contested Concepts.W. B. Gallie - 1994 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 14 (1):3-18.
The Return of Universal History.David Christian - 2010 - History and Theory 49 (4):6-27.
Title Page.[author unknown] - 2003 - New Vico Studies 21:23-23.
On the Etiology of Internal Wars.Harry Eckstein - 1965 - History and Theory 4 (2):133-163.

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Citations of this work BETA

Contemporary Concepts of Time in Western Science and Philosophy.Peter J. Riggs - 2015 - In A. McGrath & M. A. Jebb (ed.), Long History, Deep Time. Canberra, Australia: ANU Press. pp. 47-66.
Global History: Traditions, Innovations, Debates.Karl W. Schweizer - 2018 - The European Legacy 24 (2):225-230.
Intellectual History and Digital Humanities.Dan Edelstein - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (1):237-246.

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