Authors
Johanna Meehan
Grinnell College
Abstract
In this essay I argue that despite Arendt's dislike of psychology, she, like all political theorists, relies on a particular understanding of human nature. Her account, which can be discovered with a careful reading of her work, including Eichmann in Jerusalem , The Human Condition and The Origins of Totalitarianism , resonates with the explicitly psychoanalytic one of Jessica Benjamin. When the two accounts are considered together one can find the outline of a very interesting conception of the self which is neither the deconstructed, discontinuous self of postmodernism nor the strongly unified, rational subject of liberalism. This account also points to a way of under18 standing both the allure of evil and the political remedies that can stymie its realization.
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DOI 10.1080/09672550210121513
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Thinking with Hannah Arendt: An Introduction.Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich - 2002 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (2):123 – 130.

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