Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (2):195-215 (2018)

Authors
Philip Olson
Virginia Tech
Abstract
This article examines the women-led natural deathcare movment in the early 21st century U.S., focusing upon the movement’s non-coincidental epistemological and gender-political similarities to the natural childbirth movement. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach and drawing upon the author’s intensive interviews with pioneers and leaders of the U.S. natural deathcare movement, as well as from the author’s own participation in the movement, this article argues that the political similarities between the countercultural natural childbirth and natural deathcare movements reveal a common cultural provocation—one that spans the natal transition and the fatal transition.
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DOI 10.1007/s10912-016-9424-2
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Knowing “Necro-Waste”.Philip R. Olson - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (3):326-345.

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