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  1. Forgoing Debriefing in Deceptive Research: Is It Ever Ethical?Roseanna Sommers & Franklin G. Miller - 2013 - Ethics and Behavior 23 (2):98-116.
    The use of deception in research is generally permitted so long as participants are debriefed at the conclusion of their participation. Several authoritative research ethics guidelines allow investigators to omit debriefing under certain circumstances, however. Here we examine various justifications for forgoing debriefing in deceptive research, including concerns about subject pool contamination, the risk that revealing the deception will be harmful or distressing to participants, and issues of practicability. We conclude that, contrary to current practice, omitting debriefing is ethically acceptable (...)
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  • A Second Look at Debriefing Practices: Madness in Our Method?Cathy Faye & Donald Sharpe - 2009 - Ethics and Behavior 19 (5):432-447.
    This article is a reconsideration of Tesch's (1977) ethical, educational, and methodological functions for debriefing through a literature review and an Internet survey of authors of articles published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Journal of Traumatic Stress . We advocate for a larger ethical role for debriefing in nondeception research. The educational function of debriefing is examined in light of the continued popularity of undergraduate participant pools. A case is made for the methodological function of debriefing (...)
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