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  1. Why Should Educators Care About Argumentation?Harvey Siegel - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (2).
    Educators who are reflective about their educational endeavours ask themselves questions like: What is the aim of education? What moral, methodological, or other constraints govern our educational activities and efforts? One natural place to look for answers is in the philosophy of education, which (among other things) tries to provide systematic answers to these questions. One general answer offered by the philosophy of education is that the aim of education consists in fostering the development of students' rationality. On this view, (...)
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  • Communication as the Absolute Foundation of Philosophy.Robert D. Heslep - 1998 - Educational Theory 48 (1):21-32.
  • Epistemology in Excess? A Response to Williams.Siegel Harvey - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).
    Emma Williams’ ‘In Excess of Epistemology’ admirably endeavours to open the way to an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one I have defended ad nauseum in recent decades by developing, via the work of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, ‘a radically different conception of thinking and the human being who thinks’, one that ‘does more justice to receptive and responsible conditions of human thought.’ In this response I hope to show that much of Williams’ alternative approach is (...)
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  • Responses.Israel Scheffler - 1993 - Synthese 94 (1):127 - 137.
  • Foundational Issues in Evolution Education.Mike U. Smith, Harvey Siegel & Joseph D. McInerney - 1995 - Science & Education 4 (1):23-46.
  • Epistemology in Excess? A Response to Williams.Siegel Harvey - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):193-213.
    Emma Williams’ ‘In Excess of Epistemology’ admirably endeavours to open the way to an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one I have defended ad nauseum in recent decades by developing, via the work of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, ‘a radically different conception of thinking and the human being who thinks’, one that ‘does more justice to receptive and responsible conditions of human thought.’ In this response I hope to show that much of Williams’ alternative approach is (...)
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