Aristotle on the friendships of utility and pleasure

Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):303-315 (1983)
Abstract
Utility- and pleasure-Friendship in the "nicomachean ethics" have commonly been held to be wholly self-Seeking relationships and of no great interest as forms of "friendship". Recently, John cooper has argued that these relationships essentially involve disinterested concern in a subtle blending of self- and other-Regarding purposes and causes. The article argues against cooper that disinterestedness has no part in these relationships but that they can nonetheless be seen as exhibiting trust, Sharing, Interdependence, And other virtues of interpersonal relationships
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DOI 10.1353/hph.1983.0079
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Should We Take the Friendships of Children Seriously?Mary Healy - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (4):441-456.
Civic Friendship and Thin Citizenship.R. K. Bentley - 2013 - Res Publica 19 (1):5-19.

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