Offloading memory to the environment: A quantitative example [Book Review]

Minds and Machines 14 (3):387-89 (2004)
Abstract
R.W. Ashby maintained that people and animals do not have to remember as much as one might think since considerable information is stored in the environment. Presented herein is an everyday, quantitative example featuring calculation of the number bits of memory that can be off-loaded to the environment. The example involves one’s storing directions to a friend’s house. It is also argued that the example works with or without acceptance of the extended mind hypothesis. Additionally, a brief supporting argument for at least a form of this hypothesis is presented
Keywords Brain  Environment  Memory  Mind  Science
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DOI 10.1023/B:MIND.0000035454.36558.55
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