Classical Quarterly 41 (02):389- (1991)

Abstract
In chapter 9 of the Poetics Aristotle states that poetry is concerned with the universal . In this paper I shall consider three questions arising out of this statement. First, what does it mean? Secondly, what constraints does it impose on the construction of tragic plots ? I shall consider this question with special reference to the possible role of chance in tragedy. Thirdly, why is poetry concerned with the universal – that is, why is poetry such that these constraints are appropriate ?
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DOI 10.1017/s0009838800004559
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References found in this work BETA

Hamartia in Aristotle And Greek Tragedy.T. C. W. Stinton - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (02):221-.
Hamartia in Aristotle And Greek Tragedy.T. C. W. Stinton - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (2):221-254.
Aristotelian Comedy.Malcolm Heath - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (02):344-.
Note on ΠΕΡιΠΕΤΕιΑ.I. M. Glanville - 1947 - Classical Quarterly 41 (3-4):73-.

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Heidegger in the Machine: The Difference Between Techne and Mechane.Todd S. Mei - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (3):267-292.

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