Religious Studies 45 (4):471-485 (2009)

Abstract
The traditional view of divine conservation holds that it is simply a continuation of the initial act of creation. In this essay, I defend the continuous-creation tradition against William Lane Craig's criticism that continuous creation fundamentally misconstrues the intuitive distinction between creation and conservation. According to Craig, creation is the unique causal activity of bringing new patient entities into existence, while conservation involves acting upon already existing patient entities to cause their continued existence. I defend continuous creation by challenging Craig's intuitive distinction and by showing that the alternative account of creation and conservation he bases upon it is fraught with serious internal difficulties
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DOI 10.1017/S0034412509990060
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Creation and Conservation.Jonathan Kvanvig - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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