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  1. Compensation of Intellectual Disability in a Relational Dialogue on Down Syndrome.Fabiola Ribeiro de Souza & Silviane Bonaccorsi Barbato - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):49-68.
    The historical-cultural theory of Intellectual Disability overcompensation/compensation is referenced in several studies, but little empirical evidence is presented to corroborate this thesis. In this work, 13 current studies were analysed about the behavioural profile of people with Down syndrome, a case of neurobiological ID, published in the last 15 years, in order to verify the possibility of dialogue with the theorizing about compensation. Despite contributing to an up to date understanding of DS, the results point to similarities between different scientific (...)
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  2.  2
    Unintelligible Silence.Katherine E. Entigar - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):06-18.
    What is silence? Is it a loss, an omission? Is it a stopping of the mouth, of the voice? An empty place where no meaning has come forward…or perhaps at times quite the opposite, an absence-as-presence Deleuze, 1990; Derrida, 1976)? Might silence evoke much more about what we assume is our monological, unitary reality, indexing possibilities yet unseen? This paper outlines the ways in which silence is typically understood according to scholarly orthodoxy: as omission in human communication or a silencing (...)
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  3.  1
    Heeding Grammar and Language-Games: Continuing Conversations with Wittgenstein and Roth.Sam Gardner & Steve Alsop - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):34-48.
    This paper continues a conversation about Wittgenstein’s picture of language and meaning and its potential applications for educational theorising. It takes the form of a response to Wolff-Michael Roth’s earlier paper “Heeding Wittgenstein on “understanding” and “meaning”: A pragmatist and concrete human psychological approach in/for education,” in which Roth problematizes the use of the terms “understanding” and “meaning” in education discourse and proposes their abandonment. Whilst we agree with Roth about a series of central points, at the same time we (...)
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  4. Ruqaiya Hasan, in Memoriam: A Manual and a Manifesto.David Kellogg - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):19-33.
    A spectre is haunting linguistics and education: the prematurely buried legacy of Basil Bernstein, Michael Halliday, Ruqaiya Hasan and Karl Marx. On the one hand, this spectre seems to demand that we treat both language and learning as natural wholes, instead of reducing them to natural sciences like phonetics or neuroscience and social sciences like discourse analysis and curriculum studies and then trying to hook them up again through interdisciplinary links. On the other, this spectre requires us to work in (...)
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    Transformative Anti-Ableist Pedagogy for Social Justice.Dušana Podlucká - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):69-97.
    Higher education institutions are legally bound to provide equal educational opportunities for diverse learners, traditionally materialized as individualized accommodations. This paper contends that despite the growing interest and scholarship in implementing more inclusive pedagogy enabling access to education for all students, those efforts still fall short of systematically addressing intersecting, oppressive, and anti-ableist practices in the classrooms. I argue, that in order to develop a truly inclusive, equitable, socially just and transformative pedagogy and teaching practices, we need a theory that (...)
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